February 18, 2014

Issue 137
Whitewater Valley Guide
 Serving the Whitewater Valley of southeast Indiana 
and southwest Ohio.








 

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Local Events Calendar

 

Up-Coming     

Saturday, September 27 &

Sunday, September 28

 

Rural Heritage Tour

Thiebaud Farmstead

5147 East SR 56

Near Vevay, In

812 427-3560


This Week

September 23-29, 2014

 

Tuesday, September 23

 

The Senegal St. Joseph Choir

$10 & $5, 7:30 pm

Goddard Auditorium

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1474

 

Wednesday, September 24

 

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Whitney Womack Smith

Free, 7 pm

15 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 523-3035

 

Member: ?

Oxford Farmers Market

"Art is really more about?

Life than Art."

Fine Art Growing of

Goat Cheeses

& Grandmother's ?

Goat Milk Soaps

www.ArtistryFarm.com

 

Thursday, September 25

 

Autumn’s Feast

$30, 6-7:30 pm

Quaker Hill Conference Center

10 Quaker Hill Drive

Richmond, In

765 962-5741

 

Lawrenceburg Fall Fest

Centerline with DJ Akins &

The Menus

Free, 6 & 8 pm

Downtown Lawrenceburg, In

800 322-8198

 

Friday, September 26

 

Bric-a-Brac Band

$3, 9-11 pm

10 N. Foote Street

Cambridge City, In

260 251-9967

 

Olive Hill Farm Craft Show

Free, 9-5 pm

3331 N. Centerville Road

Centerville, In

765 886-5216

 

Night Hike at Cope

$5 & $3, 8:30-10:30 pm

Cope Environmental Center

4910 Shoemaker

Centerville, In

765 855-3188

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Monarch @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Appalachian Grass

$8, 6 pm

James Roberts Memorial Building

Roberts Park

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

Acoustic Final Friday

Free, 7-11 pm

Lovers Lane Stage

Lovers Lane

Metamora, In

 

Lawrenceburg Fall Fest

Darryl Worley, 8 pm

Collin Raye, 10 pm

$10 & $15

Downtown Lawrenceburg, In

800 322-8198

 

Saturday, September 27

 

Book Signing

Benjamin J. Denen

Free, 1-3 pm

4601 National Road East

Richmond, In

765 939-9545

 

Girls That Shine Gala

$75, 7 pm

Gaar Mansion Estate

2593 Pleasant View Road

Richmond, In

765 962-2362

 

Oktoberfest

Admission, 10-7 pm

923 North E Street

Richmond, In

765 966-3614

 

BikeTOURberfest

$30 & $15, 8:30 am

Parking lot

201 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 977-2886

 

Olive Hill Farm Craft Show

Free, 9-5 pm

3331 N. Centerville Road

Centerville, In

765 886-5216

 

Warm Glow Fall Festival

Free, 9-5 pm

2131 N. Centerville Road

Centerville, In

765 855-5487

 

Annual Fall Festival

St. Gabriel Church

Expo Hall

Connersville, In

765 825-8578

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Concert in the Alley

Miss Shannon’s Music Studio

Free, 6-11 pm

13 Boehringer Street

Batesville, In

 

Lawrenceburg Fall Fest

Off the Hook 5 pm

Sugar Ray, 7 pm

Cheap Trick, 9 pm

$10 & $15

Downtown Lawrenceburg, In

800 322-8198

 

Sunday, September 28

 

John Bercaw and Guests

$10, 3 pm

Oxford Community Center

10 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Saturday, September 27 &

Sunday, September 28

 

Rural Heritage Tour 

Musee de Venoge

165 Highway 129

Near Vevay, In

812 427-3560

 

Rural Heritage Tour

Thiebaud Farmstead

5147 East SR 56

Near Vevay, In

812 427-3560

 

Rural Heritage Tour

The Roman’s Family Farm

6174 Pendleton Run Road

Near Vevay, In

812 427-3560

 

On-Going

 

Franklin County Antique

Machinery Show

$5, 11 am-12 pm

Franklin County Fairgrounds

Blue Creek Road

Brookville, In

765 220-1615

Thursday-Sunday

 

112th Versailles Pumpkin Show

Free, 5-10 pm

Ripley County Courthouse

Versailles, In

888 747-5394

Wednesday-Sunday

 

Vogt Farm Pumpkin Festival

Free, All day

SR 129

Batesville, In

812 934-4627

Saturday & Sunday

 

25th Apple Festival

Free, 11 am- 6 pm

Libery Park

716 South Park Avenue

Batesville, In

812 934-3201

Saturday & Sunday

 

Hassmer Fest

$30, All day

Versailles State Park

Versailles, In

Friday-Sunday

 

In Streams

Joan Levy Hepburn exhibition

Also

Christopher Saucedo’s

September 11, 2001

Free, 9-4:30 pm

Hiestand Galleries

501 E. High Street

Oxford, Oh

Through October 9

 

Faces of Freedom

Photographs of Herbert Randall

Also

Revealing the Light Within

Free, 10-5 pm

MU Art Museum

801 S. Patterson Avenue

Oxford, Oh

Through December 6

 

Quilts of Yesteryear

Admission, 1-5 pm

Hillforest Victorian House Museum

213 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 926-0087

Through October 31

 

Bloom/Sprawl

Art of Michael Dale Bernard

Free. 9-8 pm

Leeds Gallery

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

 

Six Acre Corn Maze

Eklund’s Crazy Acres

Admission, Daily

5579 W. CR 300 N

Connersville, In

Thursdays-Sundays through October

 

Shakespeare On the Walls

Free, all day

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

Through October 6

 

SIAG Regional Art Exhibition

Free, various times

Art Guild Studio

Second and Main Streets

Aurora, In

812 926-0312

 

Member:

Oxford Farmers Market

Garden cut flower bouquets,

food for the soul.

Gourmet desserts and pastries,

food for the body.

Mary’s Plant Farm/

The Garden Café’

www.marysplantfarm.com

 

Batesville Area Historical Museum

15 W. George Street

Batesville, IN 47006

812-932-0999

Thursday 9-3 pm

Saturday 9-noon

 

Fayette County Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm Thursdays & Sundays

103 Vine Street

Connersville, In

765 825-0946

Through early December

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 

 

 

 

 







------------------------------------

Thursday, September 18

 

Author Augusta Scattergood

Book Celebration

Free, 7 pm

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

 

Walking Tour

Historic Architecture of Aurora

Free, 6:30 pm

Main Street

Aurora, In

812 926-1100

 

Friday, September 19

 

Wine Down on the Farm

$35 & $50, 5:30-7:30 pm

Huddleston Farmhouse

838 National Road

Cambridge City, In

765 478-3172

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Cotton @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Bacarah Valley

$8, 6 pm

James Roberts Memorial Building

Roberts Park

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

Woody’s Country Music Jamboree

$40, $30, $20, 2 pm-Midnight

4340 Veraestau Lane

Aurora, In

513 390-0868

 

Artist Reception

Michael Blaser

Free, 6-9 pm

Dearborn Country Club

170 Country Club Road

Aurora, In

812 926-1747

 

Saturday, September 20

 

Levi Coffin Days

Free, All day

115 Main Street (US 27)

Fountain City, In

765 935-8687

 

Winter Dreams

Richmond Symphony Orchestra

$20 & $15, 7:30 pm

Civic Hall

380 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

765 966-5181

 

Moonlight Parade

Free, 8 pm

Glen Miller Park

2200 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 983-7217

 

Heritage House Car Show

Fre, 10-2 pm

281 South CR 200 East

Connersville, In

765 825-2148

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Truck & Tractor Pull

Franklin County Young Farmers

$10 & $5, 3 pm

Franklin County Fairgrounds

Blue Creek Road

Brookville, In

765 265-9361

 

St. Louis Church Festival

Free, 6-10 pm

13 E. St. Louis Place

Batesville, In

812 934-3204

 

Woody’s Country Music Jamboree

$40, $30, $20, 11 am- 1 am

4340 Veraestau Lane

Aurora, In

513 390-0868

 

Moores Hill Heritage Festival

Free, 10 am-6 pm

Carnegie Hall campus

14687 Main Street

Moores Hill, In

812 584-9623

 

St. Teresa Benedicta Festival

Free, 5-11 pm

23670 Salt Fork Road

Bright, In

812 656-8700

 

Sunday, September 21

 

Levi Coffin Days

Free, All day

115 Main Street (US 27)

Fountain City, In

765 935-8687

 

Cruise-In

$5 & $2, 1-4 pm

Wayne County Historical Museum

1150 North A Street

Richmond, In

765 962-5756

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

St. Louis Church Festival

Free, 10-7 pm

13 E. St. Louis Place

Batesville, In

812 934-3204

 

St. Teresa Benedicta Festival

Free, Noon-5 pm

23670 Salt Fork Road

Bright, In

812 656-8700

 

City of Spires Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm

111 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 926-0944

 

On-Going

 

In Streams

Joan Levy Hepburn exhibition

Also

Christopher Saucedo’s

September 11, 2001

Free, 9-4:30 pm

Hiestand Galleries

501 E. High Street

Oxford, Oh

Through October 9

 

Faces of Freedom

Photographs of Herbert Randall

Also

Revealing the Light Within

Free, 10-5 pm

MU Art Museum

801 S. Patterson Avenue

Oxford, Oh

Through December 6

 

Quilts of Yesteryear

Admission, 1-5 pm

Hillforest Victorian House Museum

213 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 926-0087

Through October 31

 

Friendship Flea Market

NMLRA National Championship Shoot

Free, 8-4:30 pm

Friendship, In

859 341-9188

September 13-21

 

Bloom/Sprawl

Art of Michael Dale Bernard

Free. 9-8 pm

Leeds Gallery

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

 

Six Acre Corn Maze

Eklund’s Crazy Acres

Admission, Daily

5579 W. CR 300 N

Connersville, In

Thursdays-Sundays through October

 

Touching the Earth

Roger Asay & Rebecca Davis

Sculpting

Free, 9-8 pm MF, 1-8 pm SS

Leeds Gallery

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

Through September 19

 

Shakespeare On the Walls

Free, all day

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

Through October 6

 

SIAG Regional Art Exhibition

Free, various times

Art Guild Studio

Second and Main Streets

Aurora, In

812 926-0312

 

Member: Oxford Farmers Market

Garden cut flower bouquets, food for the soul.

Gourmet desserts and pastries, food for the body.

    Mary’s Plant Farm/The Garden Café’

     www.marysplantfarm.com

 

From Russia with Art

Armen Babyev show

Free, All day

Whitewater Hall

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8202

Through September 19

 

Batesville Area Historical Museum

15 W. George Street

Batesville, IN 47006

812-932-0999

Thursday 9-3 pm

Saturday 9-noon

 

Fayette County Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm Thursdays & Sundays

103 Vine Street

Connersville, In

765 825-0946

Through early December

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 

 

 

 



Tuesday, September 9

 

History of Hamilton County Parks

Free, 7:30 pm

The Oxbow

301 Walnut Street
Lawrenceburg, In

 

Thursday, September 11

 

AIR Style Show

Free, 7 pm

Richmond Art Museum

350 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

765 966-0990

 

Cooking with Annie

$40, 6:30-8:30 pm

Hillforest Victorian Mansion

213 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 926-0087

 

Friday, September 12

 

The Jeff Hamilton Trio

$20, 7:30-9 pm

Goddard Auditorium

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1474

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Wanted @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

The Mark Poe Bluegrass Band

$8, 6 pm

James Roberts Memorial Building

Roberts Park

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

Second Friday

Free, 6-9 pm

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 S. College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

 

Latin American & Caribbean

UniDiversity Festival

Free, 5:30-9:30 pm

Uptown Parks

Oxford, Oh

513 529-6518

 

Cookout and Concert

Free, 8-10 pm

Skyward Adventures

111471 US 52

Brookville, In

765 647-7272

 

St. Leon BBQ Smoke Fest &

Chili Cook Off

Free, 4:30-11 pm

St. Leon Community Park

St. Leon, In

513 885-5474

 

Saturday, September 13

 

Pottery Palooza

Free, 10-4 pm

Richmond Art Museum

350 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

765 966-0256

 

Comedy Show

Michael McDaniel, Josh Adams,

Danise, Darryl Damn

$15, 9-Midnight

204 N. 10th Street

Richmond, In

937 266-5574

 

Low Bob’s Car Show

Free, Noon-8pm

Low Bob’s Discount Tobacco

1723 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 966-8064

 

10th Annual Heritage MusicFest

Free, 6 pm

Robinson’s Whitewater River Campground

1614 SR 121

Connersville, In

765 825-2561

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

A Voyage Through Time

Life Along the Whitewater Canal

Free, Noon-4 pm

Metamora, In

765 647-6512

 

St. Leon BBQ Smoke Fest &

Chili Cook Off

Free, Noon-11 pm

St. Leon Community Park

St. Leon, In

513 885-5474

 

Oktoberfest

Free, 7-11 pm

High and Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Denver Brandt and the Wooden Wheels

Senior Dances on Main

$5, 6 pm

Second and Main

Aurora, In

812 926-1100

 

Sunday, September 14

 

Historical Marker Dedication:

Virginia Claypool Meredith

Free, 2-4 pm

Main Street

Cambridge City, In

 

Memory Lanes Antiques

Arts & Crafts Show

Free, 9-4 pm

Newkirk Mansion Lawn

Connersville, In

765 825-1281

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Member: Oxford Farmers Market

"Art is really more about Life than Art."

Fine Art Growing of

Goat Cheese

& Grandmother's Goat

Milk Soaps

www.ArtistryFarm.com

 

Oxford Arts Trio with

Thomas McDonald

$5, 3 pm

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 S. College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

 

Monday, September 15

 

Escher String Quartet

$15, 7:30 pm

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 S. College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

 

On-Going

 

Friendship Flea Market

NMLRA National Championship Shoot

Free, 8-4:30 pm

Friendship, In

859 341-9188

September 13-21

 

Six Acre Corn Maze

Eklund’s Crazy Acres

Admission, Daily

5579 W. CR 300 N

Connersville, In

Thursdays-Sundays through October

 

Touching the Earth

Roger Asay & Rebecca Davis

Sculpting

Free, 9-8 pm MF, 1-8 pm SS

Leeds Gallery

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

Through September 19

 

Shakespeare On the Walls

Free, all day

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

Through October 6

 

SIAG Regional Art Exhibition

Free, various times

Art Guild Studio

Second and Main Streets

Aurora, In

812 926-0312

 

Member: Oxford Farmers Market

Garden cut flower bouquets, food for the soul.

Gourmet desserts and pastries, food for the body.

    Mary’s Plant Farm/The Garden Café’

     www.marysplantfarm.com

 

From Russia with Art

Armen Babyev show

Free, All day

Whitewater Hall

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8202

 

Batesville Area Historical Museum

15 W. George Street

Batesville, IN 47006

812-932-0999

Thursday 9-3 pm

Saturday 9-noon

 

Fayette County Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm Thursdays & Sundays

103 Vine Street

Connersville, In

765 825-0946

Through early December

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 

 

 

 

 




Tuesday, August 19

 

Bike Night Cruise In

Free, 5:30 pm

J’s Dairy Inn

207 W. Union Street

Liberty, In

765 458-5812

 

The Menus

Tuesday Night Music

Free, 7- 9 pm

Harrison Community Center

300 George Street

Harrison, Oh

513 367-2111

 

Thursday, August 21

 

John Kogge and the Lonesome Strangers

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Ridge Runner

Music on the River

Free, 7-9 pm

High and Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

The Ruth Lyons Story

Free, 7:30 pm

Crosby Community Center

8910 Willey Road

New Haven, Oh

 

Women of the Civil War

Judy Cook performs

Free, 7 pm

Aurora Public Library

414 Second Street

Aurora, In

812 926-0646

 

Friday, August 22

 

Shrek-the Musical

$15, $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Quilt/Needlework Show

$3, 10-5 pm

Mansion House

214 E. Main

Centerville, In

765 977-5605

 

Craft Flea Market

Free, 10-5 pm

Historic Centerville

214 E. Main

Centerville, In

765 977-5605

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

DJ Francis @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Member: Oxford Farmers Market

Garden cut flower bouquets, food for the soul.

Gourmet desserts and pastries, food for the body.

    Mary’s Plant Farm/The Garden Café’

     www.marysplantfarm.com



Glen Hoy

Music on the Square

Free, 6-8 pm

Courthouse Square

26 West Union Street

Liberty, In

765 458-5976

 

Cedar Grove Fireman’s Festival

Free, 5 pm

Cedar Grove Fire Department

Cedar Grove, In

 

Saturday, August 23

 

Archway Days

Free, 11 am

Maplewood Park &

  Throughout Centerville

Centerville, In

 

Shrek-the Musical

$15, $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Add Oxford Farmers Market ads

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Mud Bog/Live Music

Admission, All day event

Haspin Acres

21208 Laurel Road

Laurel, In

765 698-2420

 

Cedar Grove Fireman’s Festival

Free, 1 pm

Cedar Grove Fire Department

Cedar Grove, In

 

Sunday, August 24

 

Shrek-the Musical

$15, $12, 2 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

On-Going

 

Touching the Earth

Roger Asay & Rebecca Davis

Sculpting

Free, 9-8 pm MF, 1-8 pm SS

Leeds Gallery

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

 

Digital Photography Exhibit

Things We Overlook

Free, All day

IU East Whitewater Hall

Richmond, In

765 973-8202

Through September 12

 

Shakespeare On the Walls

Free, all day

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

Through October 6

 

SIAG Regional Art Exhibition

Free, various times

Art Guild Studio

Second and Main Streets

Aurora, In

812 926-0312

 

From Russia with Art

Armen Babyev show

Free, All day

Whitewater Hall

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8202

 

Batesville Area Historical Museum

15 W. George Street

Batesville, IN 47006

812-932-0999

Thursday 9-3 pm

Saturday 9-noon

 

Fayette County Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm Thursdays & Sundays

321 Western Avenue

Connersville, In

765 825-0946

Through early December

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 

-------

Tuesday, August 5

 

Bike Night Cruise In

Free, 5:30 pm

J’s Dairy Inn

207 W. Union Street

Liberty, In

765 458-5812

 

Thursday, August 14

 

The SunBurners

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Parrots of the Caribbean

Music on the River

Free, 7-9 pm

High and Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Friday, August 15

 

Shrek-the Musical

$15, $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Roadside Attraction @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Unwind and Create

Free, 6:30 pm

Preble County Arts Association

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

 

The Whitaker Brothers

   with Janet Miller

$8, 6 pm

James Roberts Memorial Building

Roberts Park

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

Bacon, Blues & Brew

Free arts booths, pay performances

Walhill Farm

857 Six Pine Ranch Road

Batesville, In

812 934-2600

 

Early Fall Migrants

Oxbow Field Trip

Free, 6:30 pm

Oxbow parking lot

US 50

Greendale, In

513 52208147

 

Sullman Janszen Band

Free, 7:30 pm

Miami Township Community Center

3780 Shady Lane

North Bend, Oh

513 941-2466

 

Saturday, August 16

 

Shrek-the Musical

$15, $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Model train displays

Free, 10 am

Old Ross High School

3371 Hamilton Cleves Road

Ross, Oh

513 738-0910

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Oxford Farmers Market

Free, 8-noon

Uptown Parks

Oxford, Oh

513 505-5238

 

Cave Mountain Bluegrass Band

$6, 6 pm

Opry Barn

Pennington Road

Metamora, In

765 647-2176

 

Sunday, August 17

 

Shrek-the Musical

$15, $12, 2 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Tours at the Gaar House

$5, $2, 1-5 pm

Gaar House & Farm Museum

2593 Pleasant View Road

Richmond, In

765 966-1262

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Bacon, Blues & Brew

Free arts booths, pay performances

Walhill Farm

857 Six Pine Ranch Road

Batesville, In

812 934-2600

 

City of Spires Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm

111 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 926-0944

 

On-Going

 

Touching the Earth

Sculpting by Roger Asay and Rebecca Davis

Free, 9 am-8 pm MF, 1-8 pm SS

Leeds Gallery

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1410

From August 18

 

Shakespeare On the Walls

Free, all day

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

Through October 6

 

SIAG Regional Art Exhibition

Free, various times

Art Guild Studio

Second and Main Streets

Aurora, In

812 926-0312

 

From Russia with Art

Armen Babyev show

Free, All day

Whitewater Hall

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8202

 

Pastel Invitational

Free, 9-5 pm

Visual Arts Center

    of Preble County

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

Through August 15

 

Batesville Area Historical Museum

15 W. George Street

Batesville, IN 47006

812-932-0999

Thursday 9-3 pm

Saturday 9-noon

 

Fayette County Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm Thursdays & Sundays

321 Western Avenue

Connersville, In

765 825-0946

Through early December

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 

 

 

 

 

 



Tuesday, August 5

 

Bike Night Cruise In

Free, 5:30 pm

J’s Dairy Inn

207 W. Union Street

Liberty, In

765 458-5812

 

Exploring the Oxbow

With Dr. Jon Seymour

Free, 6:30 pm

North Dearborn Branch Library

25969 Dole Road

West Harrison, In

812 637-0777

 

Wednesday, August 6

 

River City Cruise in

Free, 6-9 pm

119 Bridgeway Street

Aurora, In

812 926-1100

 

Summer Block Party

Free, 6:30 pm

Downtown Harrison

Harrison, Oh

513 367-4316

 

Thursday, August 7

 

Paul Asaro,

Ragtime and Swing Pianist

Free, 7 pm

Gennett Mansion

1829 East Main Street

Richmond, In

RSVP 765 962-2860

 

David Gerald Band

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Jack Garrett and the Syndicate

Music on the River

Free, 7-9 pm

High and Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Pints & Pencils

Free, 6:30 pm

Great Crescent Brewery

315 Importing Street

Aurora, In

 

Friday, August 8

 

888 Roots & Americana Showcase

Free, 8 pm

E Street Pub

815 N. E Street

Richmond, In

765 488-0982

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Triple Play @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Bruce Clark & Retread Bluegrass

$6, 6 pm

James Roberts Memorial Building

30th street and Park Road

Roberts Park

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

John Kogge and John Bercaw

Second Friday

Free, 6-9 pm

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

 

Magic Camp Performance –

Spencers of Illusion

Free, all day

Hall Auditorium

101 South Campus Avenue

Oxford Oh

513 529-6333

 

James Best One Man Show

Free, 7:30 pm

Lawrenceburg High School Auditorium

Lawrenceburg, In

812 290-3475

 

Saturday, August 9

 

888 Roots & Americana Showcase

Free, 8 pm

E Street Pub

815 N. E Street

Richmond, In

765 488-0982

 

Whitewater River Cleanup

Free, 7:30 am

Robinson’s Whitewater River Campground

1614 SR 121

Connersville, In

765 825-4885

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Live Comedy

$12, 6:30 & 8:30 pm

Cat and the Fiddle

19049 Clayborn Street

Metamora, In

513 403-0672

 

St. Paul’s Festival

Free, 5-midnight

St. Paul’s Church

9798 North Dearborn Road

Guilford, In

812 623-3408

 

Dukes of Hazard

Free, 10 am-5 pm

Lawrenceburg Fairgrounds

US 50

Lawrenceburg, In

812 290-3475

 

Sunday, August 10

 

Arts & Crafts Show

Memory Lanes Antiques

Free, 9-4 pm

Newkirk Mansion Lawn

Connersville, In

765 825-1281

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Second Summer Sundays

Mountain Music Jam

Free, 2:30-5:30 pm

Indian Creek Pioneer Church

3000 Indian Creek Road

Reily Township, Oh

513 867-5835

 

Bob Kumli Memorial Car Show

Free, 9 am – Noon

Brookville Town Park

Brookville, In

765 647-2868

 

St. Paul’s Festival

Free, 11-4 pm

St. Paul’s Church

9798 North Dearborn Road

Guilford, In

812 623-3408


On-Going

 

Shakespeare On the Walls

Free, all day

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 South College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

Through October 6

 

SIAG Regional Art Exhibition

Free, various times

Art Guild Studio

Second and Main Streets

Aurora, In

812 926-0312

 

From Russia with Art

Armen Babyev show

Free, All day

Whitewater Hall

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8202

 

Batesville Area Historical Museum

15 W. George Street

Batesville, IN 47006

812-932-0999

Thursday 9-3 pm

Saturday 9-noon

 

Fayette County Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm Thursdays & Sundays

321 Western Avenue

Connersville, In

765 825-0946

through early December

 

Pastel Invitational

Free, 9-5 pm

Visual Arts Center

    of Preble County

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

Through August 15

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 

 

 

 

 


--------------------------------------

Tuesday, July 29

 

The Tuna Project

Free, 7 pm

Harrison Community Center

George Street

Harrison,Oh

 

Wednesday, July 30

 

150th Birthday Bash

Free, 3-6 pm

Morrison-Reeves Library

80 North 6th Street

Richmond, In

765 966-8291

 

Garcia and Scott at MRL

Free, 7-8 pm

Morrison-Reeves Library

80 North 6th Street

Richmond, In

765 966-8291

 

River Rats vs Champion City

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

 ------------------------------------

Member: Oxford Farmers Market

Garden cut flower bouquets, food for the soul.

Gourmet desserts and pastries, food for the body.

    Mary’s Plant Farm/The Garden Café’

     www.marysplantfarm.com

------------------------------------

Thursday, July 31

 

My Girl Friday

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Jackwagon

Music on the River

Free, 7-9 pm

High and Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Friday, August 1

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Backstage Pass @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Chanticleer String Quartet

Free, 2 pm

Morrison-Reeves Library

80 North 6th Street

Richmond, In

765 966-8291

 

River Rats vs West Virginia

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

 

New Outlook Bluegrass Band

$6, 6 pm

James Roberts Memorial Building

Roberts Park

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

St. Leon Fireman’s Festival

Free, 5 pm-1 am

28870 St. Joe Drive

St. Leon, In

812 576-3336

 

Batesville Cruise In & Bash

Free, 7-10 pm

George and Main Streets

Batesville, In

812 934-3101

 

First Friday Wine, Walk & Shop

Free, 5:30 pm

Downtown

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Tri-State Antique Market

$3, 7 am-3 pm

351 US 50

Lawrenceburg, In

513 738-7256

 

Saturday, August 2

 

River Rats vs Champion City

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Sunday, August 3

 

Jammin at the Grist Mill

Free, 1-4 pm

Metamora Grist Mill

Main Street

Metamora, In

 

Hawthorne Heights

Big Four Café Street Party

Free, 5-10 pm

Depot Street closed

Batesville, In

 

Monday, August 4

 

Goldmine Pickers

$6, 7 pm

MPA Opry Barn

19189 Pennington Road

Metamora, In

 

River Rats vs Lorain County

$8 & $6, 5:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

 

River Rats vs Lorain County

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

 

On-Going

 

Fayette County Free Fair

Various admissions, all day

Roberts Park Fairgrounds

Connersville, In

765 825-1894

through August 2

 

Fayette County Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm Thursdays & Sundays

321 Western Avenue

Connersville, In

765 825-0946

through early December

 

Pastel Invitational

Free, 9-5 pm

Visual Arts Center

    of Preble County

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

Through August 15

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 

 

 

 


 


----

Tuesday, July 22

 

Hagerstown Flying Circus

Free, 2 pm

Hagerstown Regional Airport

18434 Showalter Road

Hagerstown, In

240 313-2777

 

River Rats vs Champion City

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

 

Zack Attack

Free, 7 pm

Harrison Community Center

George Street

Harrison,Oh

 

Thursday, July 24

 

The Galactic Cowboy Orchestra

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Danny Frazier Band

Music on the River

Free, 7-9 pm

High and Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Friday, July 25

 

River Rats vs Springfield

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Crossroads @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Wooden Spoke Band

Free, 8 pm

Blooming Grove Firemen’s Festival

Blooming Grove, In

765 265-1007

 

Acoustic Final Friday

Free, 7 pm

Wendel Stage

End of Lovers Lane

Metamora, In

 

Eureka Band

Free, 8-9 pm

Liberty Park Bandstand

Batesville, In

812 934-4290

 

Bright Community Festival

Pure Grain

Free, 6 pm-1 am

23759 Brightwood Drive

Bright, In

513 315-1401

 

Brigadoon

The Rivertown Players

$10 & 8, 7-9 pm

Lawrenceburg High School

Lawrenceburg, In

812 532-3078

 

Saturday, July 26

 

Great Greenway Tour

$30 & $35, 7 am-5 pm

Cardinal Greenway

Richmond to Muncie more or less

765 977-2886

 

Local Musician’s Showcase

 featuring Jay Jesse Johnson

Live in the Glen Concert

Free, 7-10 pm

Glen Miller Park Bandshell

2200 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 983-7275

 

River Rats vs Butler

$8 & $6, 5:05 & 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

 

Fayette County Free Fair

$3, Noon

Roberts Park Fairgrounds

2690 North Park

Connersville, In

765 825-1894

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Kriss and Gregg Ziesemer

Free, 7-9 pm

Cat and the Fiddle

19049 Clayborn Street

Metamora, In

513 403-0672

 

Bright Community Festival

Gen X and After Midnight

Street parade 3 pm

Free, 4 pm-1 am

23759 Brightwood Drive

Bright, In

513 315-1401

 

St. Martin Festival

Free, 6:30 pm

York Ridge Boys @ 8 pm

8044 York Ridge Road

Yorkville, In

812 576-4302

 

Party in the Street

Free, 7-11 pm

Music @ 8 by DV8

Downtown Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Brigadoon

The Rivertown Players

$10 & 8, 7-9 pm

Lawrenceburg High School

Lawrenceburg, In

812 532-3078

 

Sunday, July 27

 

Fayette County Free Fair Parade

Free, 2 pm

21st Street to Grand to

Roberts Park Fairgrounds

2690 North Park

Connersville, In

765 825-1894

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

St. Martin Festival

Free, 11:30- 5 pm

8044 York Ridge Road

Yorkville, In

812 576-4302

 

Brigadoon

The Rivertown Players

$10 & 8, 7-9 pm

Lawrenceburg High School

Lawrenceburg, In

812 532-3078

 

On-Going

 

Ohio Little League Juniors

Free, all day

Oxford Community Park

6801 Fairfield Road

Oxford, Oh

513 523-6314

Through July 23

 

Pastel Invitational

Free, 9-5 pm

Visual Arts Center

    of Preble County

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

Through August 15

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 

 -------------------------------------

 


Wednesday, July 16

 

River Rats vs West Virginia

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

Phil DeGreg Trio

Free, 2-3 pm

Oxford Lane Library

15 S. College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 523-7531

 

Audition: Slavens and Webb

Free, 7 pm

Tiki Bar

Hearthstone Restaurant

18149 US 52

Metamora, In

765 647-5204

 

Thursday, July 17

 

Bicentennial Concert

Free, 7 pm

Maplewood Park

North Morton & East Water Streets

Centerville, In

765 220-2383

 

River Rats vs West Virginia

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

Stagger Lee

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Phil Dirt and the Dozers

Music on the River

Free, 7-9 pm

High and Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Friday, June 18

 

Bye Bye Birdie

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Blast from the Past @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

River Rats vs West Virginia

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

Unwind and Create

Admission, 6:30-8:30 pm

Preble County Arts

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

 

Olive Hill Farm Craft Show

Free, 9-5 pm

3331 N. Centerville Road

Centerville, In

765 886-5216

 

Needle and Quilt Show

Free, 10-2 pm

111 North Morton

Centerville, In

765 220-2383

 

Historic Home Tour

$12 & $15, 4-8 pm

Centerville, In

765 220-3283

 

Glen Hoy

Music on the Square

Free, 6-8 pm

Union County Courthouse

Liberty, In

 

Freudenfest

Free, 5 pm-midnight

Pearl Street

Oldenburg, In

812 934-3826

 

Eureka Band

Free, 8-9 pm

Liberty Park Bandstand

Batesville, In

812 934-4290

 

Saturday, July 19

 

Bye Bye Birdie

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

 

Historic Home Tour

$12 & $15, 4-8 pm

Centerville, In

765 220-3283

 

Bicentennial Concert

The Bulldogs

Free, 7 pm

Maplewood Park

North Morton & East Water Streets

Centerville, In

765 220-2383

 

Olive Hill Farm Craft Show

Free, 9-5 pm

3331 N. Centerville Road

Centerville, In

765 886-5216

 

Civil War Reenactment

Free, 2 pm

Centerville High Soccer Field

507 Willow Grove Road

Centerville, In

765 220-2383

 

The Sunburners

Live in the Glen Concert

Free, 8-10 pm

Glen Miller Park Bandshell

2200 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 983-7275

 

Comedy Show

$10 & $15, 9 pm

204 N. 10th Street

Richmond, In

937-266-5574

 

Presidential Pathways Road Trip

Presentation by Mary Lou Smith

Free, 10 am

Morgan Township Historical Society

Township Admin Building

3141 Chapel Road

Okeana, Oh

513 738-0910

 

Queen Contest

Fayette County Free Fair

Roberts Park Fairgrounds

Connersville, In

765 825-1894

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Cruise-In

Free, 6-9 pm

IGA Parking Lot

US 52

Brookville, In

765 647-2868

 

Freudenfest

Free, 7 am-midnight

Pearl Street

Oldenburg, In

812 934-3826

 

Summer Festival

Free, 5 pm-midnight

St. John’s Church

SR 1

Dover, In

812 576-4302

 

Sunday, July 20

 

Bye Bye Birdie

$15 & $12, 2 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

 

Classic Car Cruise In

$5 & $2, 1-4 pm

Wayne County Historical Museum

1150 North A Street

Richmond, In

765 962-5756

 

Gaar House Tours

$5 & $2, 1-5 pm

2593 Pleasant View Road

Richmond, In

765 966-1262

 

Public Ice Skating

$4.75 & $6.65, 12-1:30 pm

Goggins Ice Center

610 S. Oak Street

Oxford, Oh

513 529-9800

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Summer Festival

Free, 11 am–9 pm

St. John’s Church

SR 1

Dover, In

812 576-4302

 

On-Going

 

Centerville Bicentennial

Free, All day

Main Street-National Road

Centerville, In

765 855-5223

Through July 19

 

Franklin County 4H Fair

Free and admission, All day

Franklin County Fairgrounds

Blue Creek Road

Brookville, In

Through July 19

 

Ohio Little League Juniors

Free, all day

Oxford Community Park

6801 Fairfield Road

Oxford, Oh

513 523-6314

Through July 23

 

One Man Show: Tom Butters

Free, 9-5

Whitewater Hall Community Room

IU East

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8200

Through July 18

 

Pastel Invitational

Free, 9-5 pm

Visual Arts Center

    of Preble County

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

Through August 15

 

IPAPA Painting Indiana III

Richmond Art Museum

350 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

765 966-0256

Through July 12

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 SR 44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

Weekly Friday through October 24

 





Tuesday, July 8

 

Oxbow Program

Free, 7:30 pm

The Oxbow office

302 Walnut Street

Lawrenceburg, In

513 851-9835

 

Thursday, July 10

 

Lisa Biales and the Belle of the Blues Band

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Live Music From the Patio

Sambo

Free, 7 pm

Lil’ Charlie’s

504 East Pearl

Batesville, In

812 934-6392

 

Music on the River

Jessie Brown Band

Free, 7-9 pm

High and Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Friday, July 11

 

Bye Bye Birdie

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Ambush @ 8 pm

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

First Friday Wine, Walk & Shop

Free, 5:30-9:15 pm

Downtown

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Saturday, July 12

 

Centerville Bicentennial Party

Various fees, All day

Morton and Main Streets

Centerville, In

765 855-5223

 

Centerville Historic Home Tour

$10, 9-4 pm

Mansion House

214 E. Main Street

Centerville, In

765 977-5605

 

Bicentennial Orchestra Concert

Richmond Community Orchestra

Free, 7 pm

Maplewood Park

North Morton and Water Streets

Centerville, In

765 220-2383

 

Big Dawg on My Trail

Free, 3 pm

3407 National Road West

Richmond, In

 

City Life

Free, All day

Richmond Art Museum

350 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

765 983-7275

 

Bye Bye Birdie

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Live in the Glen

Cook & Belle with Seth Cook

Free, 8-10 pm

Glen Miller Park

2200 East Main Street

Richmond, In

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Girls Night In

Free, 7-9 pm

Cat and the Fiddle

19049 Clayborn Street
Metamora, In

413 403-0672

 

Youth Shoot

National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association

Fees, All day

Friendship, In

317 364-0120

 

Batesville Firemen’s Festival

Parade, 1 pm

Beer Garden, 2 pm

Food, 4 pm

Eureka Band, 5 pm

90 Proof Twang, 8 pm

Liberty Park

Batesville, In

812 934-2230

 

Lawrenceburg Community Yard Sale

Free, 8 am – 2 pm

Downtown

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Sunday, July 13

 

Centerville Historic Home Tour

$10, 11-4 pm

Mansion House

214 E. Main Street

Centerville, In

765 977-5605

 

Centerville Bicentennial Party

Various fees, All day

Morton and Main Streets

Centerville, In

765 855-5223

 

March on Richmond

Free, 2 pm

Wayne County Courthouse

301 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 220-2383

 

Bye Bye Birdie

$15 & $12, 2 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

Murray Theatre

1003 East Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

St. Lawrence Chicken Fest

$8 & $10, 11-7 pm

St. Lawrence Parish

542 Walnut Street

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-3992

 

Oxbow Field Trip

Free, 8 am

Upper Oxbow parking lot

US 50

Greendale, In

513 503-3389

 

Monday, July 14

 

Centerville Bicentennial Concert

Free, 7 pm

Maplewood Park

North Morton and East Water Streets

Centerville, In

765 220-2383

 

River Rats vs Champion City

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

Franklin County Fair

Free, Noon onward

Franklin County Fairgrounds

Blue Creek Road

Brookville, In

 

On-Going

 

One Man Show: Tom Butters

Free, 9-5

Whitewater Hall Community Room

IU East

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8200

Through July 18

 

Pastel Invitational

Free, 9-5 pm

Visual Arts Center

    of Preble County

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

Through August 15

 

IPAPA Painting Indiana III

Richmond Art Museum

350 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

765 966-0256

Through July 12




Wednesday, July 2

 

Open Mic Night

Free, 6-10 pm

Sherman House

35 S. Main Street

Batesville, In

812 934-1000

 

River City Cruise-In

Free, 6-9 pm

119 Bridgeway Street

Aurora, In

812 926-1100

 

Thursday, July 3

 

Blast at the Underpass

$10 & $12, 6-11 pm

4th Floor Blues Club

923 N E Street

Richmond, In

 

River Rats vs Champion City

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

DJ Francis

Eagles Lodge

75 South 12 Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Smokestack Lightning

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Pints & Pencils

Free, 6:30 pm

Great Crescent Brewery

315 Importing Street

Aurora, In

812 655-9079

 

Friday, July 4

 

July 4th at the Gaar Farm

$10, 6:30 pm

Richmond Community Orchestra

Gaar House & Farm Museum

Richmond, In

765 966-1262

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Eureka Band

Free, 8 pm

Liberty Park Bandstand

Batesville, In

812 934-4290

 

4th of July Parade and Fireworks

Free, 9 am-10 pm

Harrison Community Center

Harrison, Oh

 

Ripley Co. Chamber Fireworks

Free, 5 pm

Centerline Band

Free, 7 pm

Fireworks at dusk

Ripley County Fairgrounds

Osgood, In

812 689-6654

 

4th of July Celebration

Bike Parade, 2:30 pm

Fireworks, Free, 9:30 pm

Greendale Cabin

Greendale, In

812 537-9219

 

Saturday, July 5

 

River Rats vs Chillicothe

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

Metamora Independence Day Parade

Free, 6 pm

Stagger Lee

Free, 8 pm

Fireworks

Free, 10 pm

Metamora, In

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Hillcrest Fireworks

Free, Dusk

Hillcrest Gold and Country Club

850 Walnut Street

Batesville, In

812 934-3401

 

4th of July Fireworks

Free, 10 pm

Downtown Aurora

Aurora, In

812 926-2909

 

Hillforest’s Best of the Bayou

$45 & $50, 6:30-10:30 pm

Veraestau Historic Home

4696 Veraestau Lane

Aurora, In

812 926-0087

 

Versailles Fireworks

Free, 10 pm

Versailles State Park

1387 US 50 Versailles, In

812 689-6424

 

Sunday, July 6

 

Tours at the Gaar House

$5 & $2, 1-5 pm

2593 Pleasant View Road

Richmond, In

765 966-1262

 

River Rats vs West Virginia

$8 & $6, 6:35 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

Whitewater Ltd. Excursion

$22 & $14, 12 pm

Whitewater Valley Railroad

455 Market Street

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Jammin’ on the Porch

Free, 1-4 pm

Grist Mill

@ Canal Lock 52

Metamora, In

 

Tri-State Antique Market

$3, 7 am-3 pm

Lawrenceburg Fairgrounds

US 50

Lawrenceburg, In

513 738-7256

 

City of Spires Historical Museum

Free, 1-4 pm

111 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 926-0944

 

On-Going

 

One Man Show: Tom Butters

Free, 9-5

Whitewater Hall Community Room

IU East

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8200

Through July 18

 

 


Wednesday, June 25

 

Wayne County 4-H Fair

Admission, Days and evenings

Wayne County Fairgrounds

861 Salisbury Road North

Richmond, In

765 935-6291

For schedule visit

www.whitewatervalleyguide.com

 

Member: Oxford Farmers Market

Garden cut flower bouquets, food for the soul.

Gourmet desserts and pastries, food for the body.

    Mary’s Plant Farm/The Garden Café’

     www.marysplantfarm.com

 

Bluegrass Festival

Free, 5 pm

Gateway Park

US 52

Metamora, In

765 647-2541

 

Thursday, June 26

 

Wayne County 4-H Fair

Admission, Days and evenings

Wayne County Fairgrounds

861 Salisbury Road North

Richmond, In

765 935-6291

For schedule visit

www.whitewatervalleyguide.com

 

Jay Jesse Johnson and Lisa Biales

Free, 8 pm

O’Pub

10 W. Park Place

Oxford, Oh

513 523-6782

 

Member: Oxford Farmers Market

"Art is really more about Life than Art."

Fine Art Growing of

Goat Cheese

& Grandmother's Goat

Milk Soaps

www.ArtistryFarm.com

 

Hamilton-Fairfield Orchestra

Free, 7-9:30 pm

Oxford Summer Music Festival

Uptown Memorial Park

Oxford, Oh

513 523-8687

 

Leroy Ellington and the E-Funk Band

Music on the River

Free, 7-9 pm

High & Short Streets

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Bluegrass Festival

Admission, 5 pm

Gateway Park

US 52

Metamora, In

765 647-2541

 

Friday, June 27

 

Wayne County 4-H Fair

Admission, Days and evenings

Wayne County Fairgrounds

861 Salisbury Road North

Richmond, In

765 935-6291

For schedule visit

www.whitewatervalleyguide.com

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Monarch Band

Upstairs-Eagles Lodge

75 South 12th Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Canoefest

Free, 5 pm

Jay Jesse Johnson Band

9:30 pm

Town Park

Brookville, In

 

Acoustic Final Friday

Free, 7-10 pm

Lovers Lane Stage

Metamora, In

 

Bluegrass Festival

Admission, 6 pm

Gateway Park

US 52

Metamora, In

765 647-2541

 

Oldenburg Firemen’s Festival

Free, 5 pm

Eagle Fire Company

Pearl Street

Oldenburg, In

812 934-5856

 

The Yankee Doodle

$12, $10, $8, 7 pm

Batesville High Auditorium

Batesville, In

812 933-0355

 

Eureka Band

Free, 8 pm

Liberty Park Bandstand

Batesville, In

812 934-4290

 

F.A.R.M. Antique Tractor and Engine Show

Free, 1 pm parade

Ripley County Fairgrounds

524 West Beech Street

Osgood, In

812 654-3949

 

Saturday, June 28

 

Wayne County 4-H Fair

Admission, Days and evenings

Wayne County Fairgrounds

861 Salisbury Road North

Richmond, In

765 935-6291

For schedule visit

www.whitewatervalleyguide.com

 

River Rats vs Chillicothe

$8 & $6, 7:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

Jay Jesse Johnson Band

Free, 9 pm

Firehouse BBQ and Blues

400 N. 8th Street

Richmond, In

765 488-0312

 

Yoga at Cope!

Free, 10:30 am-1:30 pm

Cope Environmental Center

4910 Shoemaker Road

Centerville, In

765 855-3188

 

Canoefest

Free, 8 am

JetSet GetSet Band, 8 pm

Town Park

Brookville, In

 

Bluegrass Festival

Admission, Noon

Gateway Park

US 52

Metamora, In

765 647-2541

 

The Yankee Doodle

$12, $10, $8, 7 pm

Batesville High Auditorium

Batesville, In

812 933-0355

 

F.A.R.M. Antique Tractor and Engine Show

Free, All day

Ripley County Fairgrounds

524 West Beech Street

Osgood, In

812 654-3949

 

Sunday, June 29

 

River Rats vs Chillicothe

$8 & $6, 5:05 pm

McBride Stadium

201 Northwest 13th Street

Richmond, In

765 935-7287

 

The Yankee Doodle

$12, $10, $8, 2 pm

Batesville High Auditorium

Batesville, In

812 933-0355

 

F.A.R.M. Antique Tractor and Engine Show

Free, All day

Ripley County Fairgrounds

524 West Beech Street

Osgood, In

812 654-3949

 

On-Going

 

One Man Show: Tom Butters

Free, 9-5

Whitewater Hall Community Room

IU East

2325 Chester Boulevard

Richmond, In

765 973-8200

Through July 18

 

Art Show

Rural Alliance for the Arts

Free, 5-8 pm

Community Church

Batesville, In

812 934-4881

Throughout June

 



---------------------

 

Walking Tour:

Cook Family House & Hospital

Free, 10:30 am

High Street and Patterson

Oxford, Oh

513 524-5204

 

Wolf Creek Native American Gathering

Free, 10 am – Sunset

Wolf Creek Habitat

14099 Wolf Creek Road

Oak Forest, In

513 312-9143

 

Sunday, May 25

 

Wolf Creek Native American Gathering

Free, 10 am – Sunset

Wolf Creek Habitat

14099 Wolf Creek Road

Oak Forest, In

513 312-9143

 

Metamora Memorial Day Service

Free, 2-3 pm

Columbia Street Bridge

Metamora, In

 

Memorial Day Services-Bright

Free, 12:15-1:15 pm

Gibson Cemetery

Stateline Road

Bright, In

 

Monday, May 26

 

Family Fun Day-Stayin’ Alive 

Free, 10 am-1 pm

Brookville Town Park

Brookville, In

765-647-7272

 

Memorial Day Flyer

Whitewater RR Valley Flyer

$22 & $14, 12:01 pm

Grand Central Station

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Memorial Day Ceremony-Aurora

Free, 11 am-Noon

Riverview Cemetery

Aurora, In

812 926-0757

 

Memorial Day Parade & Service

Free, Service 10 am

Cliff Hill Cemetery

Versailles, In

812 689-6400

 

On-Going

 

Photo Exhibition

Free, 9 am-8 pm

Leeds Gallery-Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

Through June 4

 

Annual Juried Art Show

Free, Gallery hours

Visual Arts Center

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

Through June 27

 


Wednesday, May 14


RHS Choral Spring Concert

Free, 7:30-8:30 pm

Civic Hall

380 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

765 973-3350

 

Thursday, May 15

 

History of Fort Ancient

Free, 7:30 pm

Crosby Township Historical Society

8910 Willey Road

Harrison, Oh

513 367-0228

 

Friday, May 16

 

Franklin County Quilt Show

$5, 10 am-8 pm

Old High School Gym

1010 Franklin Avenue

Brookville, In

765 647-0797

 

Missy Werner Band

$6, 6 pm

Connersville Bluegrass Music Association

2600 Western Avenue

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Green de Ville Band

Upstairs-Eagles Lodge

75 South 12th Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Lend Me a Tenor

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 E. Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Moonlight Hike

$3, 8-10 pm

Hayes Arboretum

801 Elks Road

Richmond, In

765 962-3745

 

Whitewater Valley Motor Speedway

Admission, 7:30 pm

3505 I-44

Liberty, In

765 580-2860

 

Kevin Milner

$5, 7 pm

Metamora Music Café

United Methodist Church basement

Wynn & Church Streets

Metamora, In

 

Outdoor Orchestra Concert

Oldenburg Academy

Free, 6 pm

Behind OA Auditorium

Oldenburg, In

812 934-4440X221

 

Saturday, May 17

 

Franklin County Quilt Show

$5, 10 am-5 pm

Old High School Gym

1010 Franklin Avenue

Brookville, In

765 647-0797

 

Towpath 10K Dash & 5K Walk

$25, 8 am

Towpath Park, Clayborn Street

Metamora, Indiana 47030

 

Girls Inc. 5K Run/Walk

$25, 8 am

Middlefork Reservoir

Richmond, In

765 962-2362

 

Lend Me a Tenor

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 E. Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Model T Ford Swap & Sell

TBA, All day

Model T Museum

309 North 8th Street

Richmond, In

765 488-0026

 

The Inspiration of Broadway

$28 & $20, 8-10 pm

Civic Hall

380 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

765 973-3350

 

Comedy on the Canal

$12, 6:30 & 8:30 shows

The Cat and the Fiddle

19049 Clayborn Street

Metamora, In

513 403-0672

 

Free Fishing Day

All day

Whitewater Memorial State Park

1418 SR 101

Liberty, In

765 458-5565

 

Walking Tour:

Harry Thobe’s Brick Houses

Free, 10:30 am

131 W. Chestnut Street

Oxford, Oh

513 524-5204

 

Archaeology of Ohio

Free, 10-11 am

Admin Building

3141 Chapel Road

Okeana, Oh

513 738-0910

 

Sunday, May 18

 

Veterans of WWII

$5 & $2, 2-4 pm

Wayne County Historical Museum

1140 North A Street

Richmond, In

765 962-5756

 

On-Going

 

Photo Exhibition

Free, 9 am-8 pm

Leeds Gallery-Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

Through June 4

 

Great US 50 Annual Yard Sale

Free, All day

US 50

Versailles, In

Friday, Saturday & Sunday


-------------------------------------

 

Tuesday, May 6

 

Rarely Seen Artifacts

Free, 11 am-6 pm

1858 Morgan Township Museum

6464 Okeana Road

Okeana, Oh

513 738-0910

 

Wednesday, May 7

 

River City Cruise-In

Free, 6-9 pm

119 Bridgeway Street

Aurora, In

812 290-6117

 

Friday, May 9

 

Lend Me a Tenor

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 E. Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

The Beauty of Nature and National Parks

Free, 6-9 pm

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 S. College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 523-6228           

 

Joe Davidson & London Road Bluegrass

$6, 6 pm

Connersville Bluegrass Music Association

2600 Western Avenue

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Ambush Band

Upstairs-Eagles Lodge

75 South 12th Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Soul to Sole

Free, 8 pm

Goddard Auditorium

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

 

Oxbow Annual Birdathon

Free, 5 pm Fri-5 pm Sat

Oxbow Habitat

US 50

Greendale, In

513 851-9835

 

Saturday, May 10

 

Oxbow Annual Birdathon

Free, 5 pm Fri-5 pm Sat

Oxbow Habitat

US 50

Greendale, In

513 851-9835

 

Lend Me a Tenor

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 E. Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

A Taste of Italy

Italian-American Festival

Free 10 am-7 pm

Depot District

900 North E Street

Richmond, In

765 966-3614

 

Jane Austen Movie Series

Free, 2-4 pm

Centerville Public Library

126 E. Main Street

Centerville, In

765 855-5223

 

Walking Tour:

Tour of Lewis Place

Free, 10:30 am & 12:15 pm

310 E. High Street

Oxford, Oh

Reservations required: 513 582-3085

 

Francis Parker & Judy Clem

Book signing-Whitewater Valley Railroad

10 am-Noon

Grand Central Station

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

The Statesman w/Abe Lincoln

Whitewater Valley RR

$22 & $14, 12:01 pm

Grand Central Station

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

Sunday, May 11

 

Lend Me a Tenor

$15 & $12, 2 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 E. Main Street

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Mothers Day Flyer

Whitewater Valley RR

$22 & $14, 12:01 pm

Grand Central Station

Connersville, In

765 825-2054

 

On-Going

 

Batesville Kiwanis Carnival

Free, 5-9 pm

Village Green

Batesville, In

812 934-5267

(Thursday-Sunday)



 


 





Tuesday, April 8

 

Sean Lamb

Free, 6 pm

Firehouse BBQ and Blues

400 N. 8th Street

Richmond, In

765 488-0312

 

Book signing

Lori Rose: The Road Less Traveled

Free, 10 am – 2 pm

27 E. High Street

Lawrenceburg, In

812 539-2665

 

Wednesday, April 9

 

Miami U Steel Band

Free, 7:30 pm

Hall Auditorium

Oxford, Oh

513 529-3200

 

Harris Face

Wolf Cryer

Free, 7:30-10 pm

Taffy’s

123 East Main

Eaton, Oh

937 456-1381

 

Thursday, April 10

 

Albert Herring, opera

 by Benjamin Britten

$15, $13, $12, 7:30 pm

Abegglen Theatre

MU Center for Performing Arts

Oxford, Oh

513 529-3200

 

Doug Hart

Free, 7 pm

Firehouse BBQ and Blues

400 N. 8th Street

Richmond, In

765 488-0312

 

Open Mike

Free, 7-10 pm

Taffy’s

123 East Main

Eaton, Oh

937 456-1381

 

Acoustic entertainment

Cover, 9 pm

Indian Creek Tavern

6206 Main Street

Reily, Oh

513 756-9400

 

Radio Suspense Theatre

Rivertown Players

Tickets, 7 pm

City of Spires Museum

111 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 532-3078

 

Friday, April 11

 

Albert Herring, opera

 by Benjamin Britten

$15, $13, $12, 7:30 pm

Abegglen Theatre

MU Center for Performing Arts

Oxford, Oh

513 529-3200

 

Meghna

Bud Summers

Free, 8-11 pm

Taffy’s

123 East Main

Eaton, Oh

937 456-1381

 

Spamalot

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 East Main

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Jane Austen Movie Series

Free, 2-4 pm

Centerville Public Library

126 E. Main

Centerville, In

765 855-5223

 

Second Friday

Free, 7 pm

Oxford Community Arts Center

10 S. College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

 

Missy Werner Band

$6, 6 pm

Connersville Bluegrass Music Association

2600 Western Avenue

Connersville, In

812 346-5215

 

Interaction Singles Dance

$6, 6-11 pm

Silver Mountain Band

Upstairs-Eagles Lodge

75 South 12th Street

Richmond, In

765 977-8242

 

Brian Keith Wallen

Free, 8 pm

Firehouse BBQ and Blues

400 N. 8th Street

Richmond, In

765 488-0312

 

Radio Suspense Theatre

Rivertown Players

Tickets, 7 pm

City of Spires Museum

111 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 532-3078

 

Saturday, April 12

 

Albert Herring, opera

 by Benjamin Britten

$15, $13, $12, 7:30 pm

Abegglen Theatre

MU Center for Performing Arts

Oxford, Oh

513 529-3200

 

Stuart Little

$8 & $6, 2 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 East Main

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Spamalot

$15 & $12, 7:30 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 East Main

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Asanas & Ales

$30, 5-8:30 pm

Beatree Yoga

424 N. 10th Street

Richmond, In

765 267-1341

 

Jayne Sachs

Quiet Hollers

Free, 8-11 pm

Taffy’s

123 East Main

Eaton, Oh

937 456-1381

 

Jazz & Percussion Concert

Free, 7:30 pm

Goddard Auditorium

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1373

 

Richmond Symphony Concert

Tickets, 7:30-9:30 pm

Civic Hall

380 Hub Etchison Parkway

Richmond, In

 765 973-3350

 

Bach and Boombox

BYOiPod

Free, 1:30 pm

College Avenue

Oxford Community Arts Center

513 524-8506

 

The Barber of Seville

Free, 3 pm

College Avenue

Oxford Community Arts Center

513 524-8506

 

Keb’ Mo’ SOLD OUT!

$35, 7:30 pm

MU Dave Finkelman Auditorium

4200 E. University Blvd

Middletown, Oh

513 529-3200

 

Female Singer-Songwriter Showcase

Free, 7 pm

Cat & the Fiddle

Clayborn Street

Metamora, In

513 403-0672

 

Antique Cameras 1800s-1950

Free, 10 am

Morgan Township Historical Society

3141 Chapel Road

Okeana, Oh

513 738-0910

 

Backlash

Free, 9 pm

Randy’s Roadhouse

151 Batesville Shopping Village

Batesville, In

812 934-4900

 

Sean Lamb Band

Free, 9 pm

Firehouse BBQ and Blues

400 N. 8th Street

Richmond, In

765 488-0312

 

Radio Suspense Theatre

Rivertown Players

Tickets, 7 pm

City of Spires Museum

111 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 532-3078

 

Sunday, April 13

 

The Short Tree And

  The Bird That Could Not Sing

Free, 2 pm

Oxford Community Arts Center

College Avenue

Oxford, Oh

513 524-8506

 

Stuart Little

$8 & $6, 2 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 East Main

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Spamalot

$15 & $12, 2 pm

Richmond Civic Theatre

1003 East Main

Richmond, In

765 962-1816

 

Rhonda Vincent with

  Feller & Hill

$20, $15, $10, 7 pm

Lawrenceburg High Auditorium

100 Tiger Blvd

Lawrenceburg, In

812 539-4251

 

Radio Suspense Theatre

Rivertown Players

Tickets, 2 pm

City of Spires Museum

111 Fifth Street

Aurora, In

812 532-3078

 

Monday, April 14

 

Buffalo Soldier

Free, 7 pm

Aurora City Park Pavilion

Park Street

Aurora, In

812 926-0646

 

Johnny Azari

Free, 7:30-10 pm

Taffy’s

123 East Main

Eaton, Oh

937 456-1381

 

On-Going

 

Preble’s Creative Kids

An Exhibit of Budding Artists

Free

Visual Arts Center

601 Hillcrest Drive

Eaton, Oh

937 456-3999

 

Senior Capstone Show

Free, 9 am – 8 pm

Leeds Gallery

Earlham College

801 National Road West

Richmond, In

765 983-1474

 

On display!

Pastels by Jenelle Burris

Pottery by Marcia Pendley

Free, 10 am- 7:30 pm

Centerville Public Library

126 E. Main Street

Centerville, In

765 855-5223

Throughout April

 

Abstract Nature of H.A. Sigg

Free, 9-5 pm

Farmer Gallery

MU Art Museum

801 South Patterson Avenue

Oxford, OH 45056

513-529-2232

Through May 17

 

African Art

Free, 9-5 pm

McKie Gallery

MU Art Museum

801 South Patterson Avenue

Oxford, OH 45056

513-529-2232

Through May 17

 

Reality is Broken

Free, 9-5 pm

Douglass Gallery

MU Art Museum

801 South Patterson Avenue

Oxford, OH 45056

513-529-2232

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 


Snow fog
Pie in the Sky

Whitewater Valley 
Cemetery Trail

Whitewater Valley Archeological Trail

Creation of the Whitewater Valley Culinary Arts College with campuses throughout the Valley.

Valley educators teaching about covered bridges engineering and history.

A group with a Valley-wide scope and mission that actually practices collaboration.

A hiking trail system along the entire length of the Whitewater Valley on the Indiana side.

Whitewater Valley Hostel Association

Pocket Park system along creeks on property now publicly owned by townships or municipalities.

Little Detroit Museum in Connersville

Whitewater Valley Covered Bridge Trail

Cedar Grove Bridge Park

A designated bike trail with lots of loops throughout the Whitewater Valley.
For this week's 
Whitewater Valley 
Calendar of Events

Professional level golf fun

   Our local professional golf hero is Bo Van Pelt who got his name on the second page of the leader board at the Masters this year before fading to par. Bo was born in Richmond and was trained, maybe is still being trained, by a pro from Oxford.

   What that means to you is there are enough golf courses in and around the Whitewater Valley to train like a pro. But if you just want to knock some around, you can also be comfortable with our local courses.

   At the Sagamore Resort on Brookville Lake is the 18-hole Buck Point Course. This Pete Dye-designed beauty is over 7000 acres of par 72 golf.

   Brookville has Brook Hill Golf Club on either side or Reservoir Road, north of SR1 as you head towards Blooming Grove. It is an 18-hole public par 71 course covering over 6,000 acres.

   Liberty Country Club is on US 27 about 16 miles north of Brookville. It is a par 70, 18-hole public course.

   Also 16 miles from Brookville but along Brookville Pike to Oxford, Ohio, then up Brown Road is Hueston Woods State Park Golf Course. It is listed as a municipal golf course. It is 18 holes with a par of 72 and since it is a state park there will be a gate admission.

   Willowbrook Country Club is open to the public in Connersville, a mere 18 miles from Brookville Lake. It features 18 holes and par for the course is 72.

   Cricket Hollow is public nine-hole facility on Pocket Road between Oldenburg and Batesville with a course par of 35.

Old channel bed
Whitewater River
West Fork

    Valley Pride

    According to a hydrography map, the watersheds of the Great Miami River include Preble, Butler Hamilton counties in Ohio and Wayne, Fayette, Union, Franklin and parts of Ripley and Dearborn counties in Indiana. 

    This means our Whitewater River is seen as merely a tributary of the Miami River, but we know it is what makes the Miami Great.

(Check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:MiamiRivers_watershed.png if you don’t believe me.)

Wilbur Wright,
One famous Whitewater Valley man


Second call for hostels

Free Images
   We had a few esponses to our Facebook question which wasn't posed as a question but a request. The request was to read thoughtfully and perhaps for the second time Hustling for Hostels. It's in Issue 66 which you can access by scrolling down a bit in the column to the right.

    The point is, creating a Whitewater Valley Hostel Association is a good idea. It should be done through an organization with a scope large enough to encompass all counties in the Valley.

    Wonder who that could be?

Early September 
Photo Essay:

Glidewell Mound 
and beach path

   

    Traveling through the gate of Mounds SRA and past the turnoff to the camping area, Mounds Beach Road slithers down to the beach beside large shoulders of mown grass on either side.  

    The lawn sometimes sports picnic tables in cozy spots like under the green eaves of a small blue spruce grove. 

    An estuary formed by one of the fingers of the lake is the temporary home of a flock of migrating or formerly migrating Canada Geese. 

    They converge on the strip of sand that begins to grow into the ample beach at the Mounds SRA. We assume the beach sand has been augmented by several hundred truckloads of store-bought sand. 

    Sunbathers have the beach almost to themselves on a Friday afternoon in early September. The air still has all the force of summer though in a week’s time nightly temperatures would drop into the 40s and the air become tinged with the clarity of imminent change—the coming of winter. 

    The only active boats in the vicinity are two jet skies patrolling close to shore near the beach before taking off around Glidewell Point. The Glidewell Mound overlooks this ancient river bed now filled with surplus water. 


    A thin path between the waving grasses heads to a strip of natural beach which itself winds around a corner and heads around a lagoon still spiked by the trees that were drowned when the lake was created. 

    If you follow the gravel shore around the lagoon you could reach the Fairfield trail connecting by foot the Fairfield Causeway to Mounds Beach Road just at the point where the Glidewell Trail begins. 

   

    The Glidewell Trail is not part of the Adena Trace Hiking Trail system. Both Fairfield Trail and Templeton Trail are. They meet just before Fairfield Trail hits the road. Templeton then carries on another two miles before again connecting, this time with the happily named .7 mile Wildlife Wander. 

    Glidewell Trail begins as a two lane wooded path before it offers a short loop of only two miles. Its possible maybe even logical to assume, even with what we know about assumptions, the longer four mile route was created for Dr. George W. Hosmer’s wagon to carry his team to the mound.

     “This is the most renowned mound in the county,” according to Frank M. Setzler who reported in ‘The Archaeology of the Whitewater Valley’ that when Dr. George W. Hosmer partially excavated the Glidewell Mound it was 15 feet high and 60 feet in diameter. The slump of soil that is today’s mound is the merest shadow of this mound in its glory.

    While he first visited the mound in 1871, in June of 1879 Dr. Hosmer began the excavations; he published his “Remains on White Water River” beginning on page 732 of the Smithsonian Annual Report for 1882. 

Guide to the possible 
Scroll down for Local Calendar                        Weekly Email Guide Free Click Here
September 16-22, 2014
Oldenburg Stone Bridge

From Miami to Miami

    The Oxford Community Arts Center will host An Afternoon with John Bercaw with special guests Bill Jackson and Jimmy Seward this Sunday at 3 pm.

    John Bercaw is a local Jazz musician with masters degrees in classical works from Miami University and jazz piano from the University of Miami, Florida.

    John says "I have been an improviser all my life, since I figured out I didn't have to play the notes as written on the printed page. My teacher, in order to keep me studying, gave me some boogie-woogie to learn, and that did the trick. I could invent new choruses on the 12-bar format and I've been creating new choruses ever since. "

    The group is offering the concert as a benefit for the arts center. It’s $5 at the door with all proceeds benefiting the Community Arts Center.

Local music scene

    This week and next you’ll be excused for drifting south like the Robins, which I’ve been told are leaving early this year. Batesville is not exactly south but it’s south of most of the Valley so it’s included as a first fly-over.

    Specifically, the Concert in the Alley Miss Shannon’s Music Studio is putting on this Saturday evening behind the Boehringer Building on the street of the same name. It is one of the first commercial buildings in Batesville and still one of its tallest. We can’t say the same for the alley.

    CRB, She’s With Me, The Peace and The Yorkridge Boys are featured. It’s free and starts at 6 pm.

    Then there’s the big mama of this week’s Valley music schedule, the Lawrenceburg Fall Fest, which is followed next week by Aurora’s Farmers Fair (at this writing only eight days, three hours, five minutes and 52 seconds away). Lawrenceburg humbly notes, “In the mood for great, big name, live music? You’ll find it at the Lawrenceburg Fall Fest!”

    Who dey live music? you might ask in your best Cincinnatease.

    Our own Whitewater Guide calendar answers Sugar Ray and Cheap Trick on Saturday night, Darryl Worley and Collin Raye on Friday night and Thursday night it’s free with Centerline and The Menus, but not playing together.

    Cambridge City has not been known on the Guide calendar for its nightlife but that’s all going to change on Friday when the Bric-a-Brac Band performs at 10 North Foote Street which by our Google research is or once was Just A Little Off the Top Hair Salon, but is now Stage Door, an antique, vintage, music lessons & instruction store, obviously with room for a big band.

    Our further research shows Bric-a-Brac to be a seven-member band out of Chicago whose lead vocalist is none other than John Connors, probably only a sonic relation to the founder of Connersville. They have been featured on NPR’s ‘This American Life’ and of themselves say:

    “The definition of Bric-a-Brac is ‘miscellaneous curios,’ and Bric-a-Brac plays the role of Audio Archivist, sharing a litany of unknown, obscure songs with the world. The Bric-a-Brac repertoire spans rock, jazz, lounge, and movie soundtracks, expertly arranged with Bric-a-Brac's signature musty rumpus room aesthetic.”

    New room, new aesthetic, new activity in sleepy old Cambridge City. Jump in! It’s musty rumpus room time!

Rural Heritage is calling you

    Take a break from life as you know it and come visit three sites that honor Switzerland County’s unique rural past. The Rural Heritage Tour will take place Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from noon to 5 pm in the countryside near Vevay, Indiana.

    Experience the early life, music and trades of the French-Swiss settlers who made Switzerland County, Indiana their home at Musee de Venoge and the Thiebaud Farmstead. Also visit the Romans’ Family Farm where the bounty of fresh produce for “Eating Seasonally CSA” (Community Supported Agriculture) is grown.

    Musee de Venoge at 165 Hwy 129 is one of the few remaining examples of French colonial architecture once common in Switzerland County in the early 1800s. An 1812 militia, cider making and food preparation in an outdoor bake oven are just a few of the special experiences for the site.

    At the Thiebaud Farmstead at 5147 East State Road 56, an 1850s Greek Revival house restoration, the family will be preparing for their daughter’s wedding on Saturday with the ceremony to take place on Sunday. A Civil War unit and children’s games will add to the daily chores of hearth cooking and sewing of the time period.

    The Romans’ Family Farm at 6174 Pendleton Run Road gives a real insight into coordinating a long growing season to provide a wide array of vegetables and other fresh produce.

    Admission is free and donations are appreciated. For further information visit 

www.switzcomuseums.org or www.venoge.org or call 812-427-3560 or 812-593-5726.



Oktourbikefest and gesundheit

    The main fundraiser for the Wayne County section of the Cardinal Greenway takes place this Saturday. Seasonally but unwieldy named BikeTOURberfest is the second annual event and features three routes of varying lengths. “Riders can capture nature with a ride equipped with awesome SAG stops while having the opportunity to visit the Depot District’s Oktoberfest upon finishing,” we are told.

 

Bike fest in Versailles

    Hassmer Fest at Versailles State Park is a way to give back to the trails that carry you the rest of the year. At VSP they are celebrating 10 years and (so far) 16 miles of mountain bike trails with the Hassmer Fest. Part of the fun is seeing ‘what Hassmer is all about.’

    For a $30 per day donation, you can ride the trails to your heart’s content, camp for free in your tent or RV, use the showers and bathrooms and listen to live music on Saturday night. So there’s your cue as to when to get the best bang for your outdoor trail supporting dollar. Besides the music on Saturday, there is also a bike swap meet from 4 to 6 at the Shimmerhorn Shelter House.

Free fire is also a feature of the Fest. Promoters say ‘leave your grills and fire pits at home. Charcoal grills are provided.’ Around 5:30 the grills will be ready and at sunset there will be a bond fire. So bring any bonds you might want to throw upon the pyre.


Local solution’s only need apply

    The problem with Farmers Markets is location, location, location. The goods they contain, the ethic they sustain week after week by bringing local food to local consumers is stuck on that word local. It is too flexible and way too subjective. It seems to follow the subject, dba ‘you’, wherever he, she and it goes.

    If you are in and around Oxford on any given Saturday morning, you’re Oxford local tempore and the food you buy at the Farmers Market (why else would you be in Oxford on a Saturday morning?) is dealt to you locally and honestly so.

    But if you find yourself in Brownsville, Lawrenceville, Laurel or Alquina you are no longer Oxford local (temporary or otherwise) so what do you do for your market fix and fresh produce? Go whistlin’, I guess.

    Would the Oxford farmer like to have folks from all the towns in the Whitewater Valley able to enjoy their food? I’d say, yes, as much as they have.

    Is there a demand in the small towns of the Valley for the goods of Oxford Farmers Market? Again, I’d say, yes, as much as they can have.

    Like I said, the problem with Farmers Markets is location, location, location.



September 16-22, 2014

A case of candelabras?

    Last week we asked for answers to the mystery of what these cases were or are used for. The cases are in the collection of the Fayette County Historical Museum. Nick Green whose email address includes “everydayprophets” had an answer.

    He wrote, “Regarding your request about what the cases are for in the museum, our best guess is that they are for transporting or shipping expensive candelabras, such as this one: http://www.churchsupplies.com/store/ziegler-standing-advent-wreath-3981.shtml.

    Thanks Nick. We believe anyone who isn’t profiting from being a prophet, but let’s wait to hear from the museum before we pronounce this case closed.

 

Wine and silent art

    For a mere fifty bucks (not including the price of the book) you can Wine Down on the Farm with the good people of Indiana Landmarks this Friday. The farm is the Huddleston Farmhouse in Cambridge City and the event “blends art, a locally sourced harvest spread, and the story of the Richmond Group, one of Indiana's first art colonies.”

    Shaun Dingwerth, director of the Richmond Art Museum, has written a book on the Richmond Group. It is called Out of the Silence and will be available to purchase. RAM will also have paintings by the Richmond Group on display.

 

Sweet September ride

    In the Up-Coming section of our calendar you have seen teasers for the Rural Heritage Tour coming up September 27 & 28 in Switzerland County. We have mentioned all three of the sites featured in this two-day event. They were (and are) Musee de Venoge, Thiebaud Farmstead and Romans’ Family Farm. Together they form an accurate and detailed portrait of why Switzerland County was named after the Swiss.

    If you’ve been thinking about taking a sweet September ride south and slightly west we recommend Vevay for your destination and the Rural Heritage Tour for your countryside ambling.

 

Local Music Scene

    Woody’s County Music Jamboree is a new festival happening in Aurora this Friday and Saturday. New? Well, we’ve been  doing the Guide for over four years now and haven’t seen it listed before, so it’s new to us.

    Who can you expect to hear? Sarah Davidson, John Riggins, Ashley Martin, Dallas Moore, Karen Waldrup and the Rooks, Ashby Fork Band, Jambox, The Kline Family Band, Young Antiques, The Renegades and a fireworks show.

    The setting is the Veraestau Historic Home which is on 350 acres of land overlooking the beautiful Ohio River. See our calendar for the gory details like when, where and how much.

 

Festive options abound

    Throughout the Valley and a bit beyond there are plenty of reasons to mix and mingle outdoors this weekend. In Fountain City it is Levi Coffin Days this weekend. Expect to mix with around 30,000 folks while you ostensibly celebrate the heroes of the Underground Railroad, though we don’t expect there will be much mention of why it’s named Levi Coffin Days. It’s kind of like there’s not much canal in Canal Days, either the Cambridge City or Metamora varieties.

    It’s St. Louis in Batesville this weekend. St. Louis Church Festival is this Saturday and Sunday. Likewise on those days in Bright it’s St. Teresa Benedicta Festival. Since Bright and Batesville both begin with B and aren’t very far apart, we recommend you look for a byway or back road to bring you from one to the other.

    If you chose Saturday for your ramble, you might also include Moore Hill Heritage Festival which is on the campus of Carnegie Hall, one of those outstanding architectural gems usually forgotten by the rest of us expect for special times like the Heritage Festival.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The undercarriage of 1870s McFarlan

Issue 166 

Sept 9-15, 2014

 

Of pottery and a native son

    If you like jazz and pottery, not necessarily in that order, you might consider spending Friday night in a B&B or other such facility in or near Richmond. The Jeff Hamilton Trio is playing at Earlham College on Friday evening and Pottery Palooza is sort of oozing over the Richmond Art Museum lawn on Saturday, perfectly convenient for when you’d have to vacate your one-nighter anyway.

    Pottery Palooza has everything from high art to mugs, hand-made sculptures to hands in clay, more specifically your hands in clay, should you be so inclined. Live music and food vendor booths are also highlights of this al fresco opportunity to rub elbows with talented regional artists who work in clay.

    Jeff Hamilton being a Richmond lad would be wise to drop in on the Pottery Palooza, though ‘drop-in’ is probably not a popular concept among pottery artists. Drummer Hamilton headlines with pianist Tamir Hendelman and bassist Christoph Luty who together are considered one of the swingingist small groups in jazz.

    They are internationally known and Jeff Hamilton was named Best Jazz Drummer by Modern Drummer magazine for several consecutive years, we are told. They do original compositions as well as standards.

    The Jeff Hamilton Trio Goddard Auditorium foray is co-sponsored by Starr Gennett Foundation for the Annual Gennett Records Walk of Fame Music Festival.

 

Art with your Beyonce

    Any band—be it orchestra or Dorkestra—that is odd enough to make a sesqui-annual gig for four years running certainly deserves our attention and our ears. This Friday aka Second Friday, Oxford Community Arts Center features the 18-member Molly Franklin Dorkestra along with two new art exhibits. Eighteen months ago the 18-members (give or take) also appeared at Second Friday, putting the year and a half in ‘sesqui’.

    The Molly Franklin Dorkestra plays not only Molly music but Spike Jones, Beyonce and other equally far out eclecticism. How they bounce back from Beyonce will be an interesting Second Friday twist.

    The object of Second Friday is to showcase the many Art Center offerings such as the Art Shop Co-op and third floor artists’ studios. Then of course there are new art exhibitors.

    “My work can be seen as an extension of day dreaming,” says Taurey Layne Overturf of her new exhibit Shapes and Forms.

    Charlie Haskins’ exhibit The Adventures of Karlie depicts a curious child caught up in a surreal world. Haskins combines elements of storytelling and humor to express his observations on life and art.

    We should also mention the Oxford Community Arts Center is also hosting live music on Sunday and Monday evening. The Oxford Arts Trio with guest Thomas McDonald plays at 3 pm Sunday. Vivaldi and violins are on the menu. At 7:30 Monday evening Escher String Quartet holds forth. This is a globe-trotting group who hop across the Atlantic as though they had seven league boots.

    Oddly enough, their website says they are playing in Hall Auditorium this Monday, but websites at Oxford Community Arts Center and Oxford Visitors Bureau both say otherwise. We’re going with otherwise but if we’re wrong, it’s about a two-hour concert and Hall is not more than 10 minutes from OCAC. You may theoretically thank the Guide for the exercise.

 

A cushy ride in Connersville

    We stopped at the Fayette County Museum to visit the McFarlan carriage exhibit and talk with Richard Stanley, the author of Custom Built by McFarlan: A History of the Carriage and Automobile Manufacturer, 1856-1928. The book’s cover art was taken from the standing exhibit. The painting features two carriages, one horse-driven the other horseless.

    The horseless carriage on the cover is a chauffeur driven town car just like the one on display at the museum. But where the museum McFarlan is dove gray and black, the one on the cover is royal blue with gold headlamps, radiator bumper and windscreen trim. In the Acknowledgements there is a photo of the artist John Blommel holding the picture he painted “as a courtesy to the author.”

    Mr. Stanley wrote, “John’s involvement with this publication is especially appropriate because his grandfather, William, came to Connersville in 1909 to assist with getting McFarlan automobiles into production. His father, Henry, was a contributing author for the book What Was the McFarlan? published in 1967.”

    Beside the gilded blue McFarlan is a black carriage with plush leather seats, red wheel and red undercarriage. It is the spitting image of the 1870’s McFarlan Carriage, made in Connersville, btw, on display at the museum, also made in Connersville.

     Richard called my attention to the spring arrangement between the wheels and upper carriage. Comfort of ride was obvious by the numerous sets of springs and tension releases crisscrossed in a light artistic maze of efficiency.

 

Hoosier Whatsit

    Visitors to the Fayette County Museum are welcome to join the board and ponder what exactly these two cases were used for. They are made like hard-shelled instrument cases with sturdy metal clasps. Anyone who knows what they are or anyone just wanting to take a guess is welcome to call the museum at 765 825-1523.

 

Farming pioneer feted in Cambridge City

    The latest issue of the digital surprise ‘Hidden Gems Indiana’ features – “Cambridge City: The Crossroads of Canal Era Indiana.” The authors come to that conclusion because the canal was built to terminate at Cambridge City where it hit the National Road, ergo crossroads.

    But when it comes to canal presence, they admit, “You’ll have to look hard to find evidence of the canal, long-since filled in along with most of Indiana’s canals (you can find exceptions in Indianapolis, Metamora, and Delphi). There’s a section in a front yard on Center Street and a stone arch near the Vinton House where the canal passed under the National Road. It doesn’t matter, because the town itself is the artifact worth exploring, walking through its historic residential areas and along the National Road.”

    They wrote the article to coincide with Cambridge City’s Canal Days last weekend, but this Sunday afternoon the Queen of American Agriculture, Virginia Claypool Meredith will be remembered in a two-hour ceremony unveiling an Indiana Historical Marker dedicated to this Whitewater Valley farming pioneer.

 

Spokes-models wanted for history project

    Sunman-based Satolli Glassmeyer has expanded on his passion for saving old buildings and bridges from demolition. Satolli runs ‘History in Your Own Backyard’. When it comes as an email the From line reads ‘History in Your Own Backy’ which is impossible not to open quickly. (Tobacco again proves to be irresistible.)

    His latest called for spokes-models to do short pieces on local history. On September 6th they were shooting in Moores Hill.

    “There’s tons of stuff out there that we are going to lose in the near future,” he responded to our question of why History in Your Own Backyard. HYOB’s website has short two to three minute videos “of some of the more unusual historic sites in the tri-state area.”

    Satolli has been an important part of the effort to save Cedar Grove Bridge from the very first meeting on the bridge in August 2011. He grew up in Western Hills of Cincinnati and was an avid 10-speed biker often “racking up over 100 miles on a Saturday bicycle ride to explore the hidden treasures of the tri-state area,” he writes on his website explaining About Us.

    He moved to Sunman and “was literally amazed with what I could find within 10 miles of my home.”  Once he learned the clues of off-the-road historic siting, “I discovered these sites everywhere I went.” But this led to the recognition that “all of these sites are now disappearing at a very rapid pace.”

    That is why he’s decided “we need a national clearing house to let everyone know about the history in their own backyards before these jewels disappear forever.”

He feels creating these short videos is the best way to preserve them.

    With all that as background, HYOB is looking for young adults between the ages of 15 and 30 to volunteer to narrate and present these videos.

    We watched the Ohio County Court House video from Rising Sun with Erika Padilla and learned it would be a good place to visit if only for the second story balcony and the photo ops from there. It is also something Erika herself will certainly use as part of her video resume.

    Satolli wrote, “It’s pretty simple. You show up at the production site and read the script on and off screen. You can do one video or hundreds of videos . . . we’ll have more work than we can handle.”

    If your model is the speaking version, and exposing history is your thing, call HYOB at 812 623-5727 or email info@HistoryInYourOwnBackyard.com

Spotlight: Farmers Market


    Oxford Farmers Market manager Larry Slocum “can’t think of a better way to show you how inviting and friendly our market is than to have Marvin Hurston welcome you.  We now have 40 vendors bringing fresh farm products, baked goods and artwork. 

    “Our market follows the Make It, Bake It or Grow It rule.  So everything you see has that fresh flavor because it made, baked or grown by the person you are buying it from.”

    Make it a habit to visit Oxford Farmers Market every Saturday from 8 am to noon.

Lantz Arch

Issue Archives---


Centerville and Archway Days

    Archway Days has reached its 26th anniversary, but the archways for whom the days were named have been a part of Centerville just about as long as Centerville has been part of Wayne County. The archways are picturesque and practical and bring to Centerville a distinctive architecture.

    Saturday is the big Archway Day beginning at 11 am in Maplewood Park. Tyler Stroh will entertain. There will be craft vendors, food for all and games for the kids. The event also happens throughout downtown Centerville which means on both sides of the wide, wide National Road.

    The treat at the end of the day is the annual parade and since this is mid-August these summer glimpses of pure Americana are growing rarer. Bring your video camera and relive Archway Days on a gloomy February evening when the TV re-runs start.

 

A Not-Archway Days quilt

    While it might not be part of the official Archway Days ceremony, Historic Centerville’s Quilt and Needlework Show will be this Friday and Saturday overlapping Archway Days and giving you another reason to come to Centerville to celebrate this weekend. The Q&N show goes from 10 – 5 each day at the Mansion House at 214 E Main Street in Centerville. Admission is $3.

    All proceeds from the show and flea market go towards the restoration and maintenance of the Mansion House property which includes the Salisbury Court House.

Myra Baldwin reports, “Historic Centerville thanks the community for its support of our many fund raising projects. We now have nearly half of the $40,000 needed for the repair of the Court House.” 

                 My Brothers Keeper


Opry Barn offerings

    The Opry Barn, Metamora’s newest performing arts center, has lined up its Bluegrass schedule for the next three months. G.I. Ball, mandolin player and vocalist for the Baggy Bottom Boys, is the producer of the Opry Barn’s Bluegrass nights. On September 27, he has My Brothers Keeper scheduled. The Facebook page for this Cincinnati-homebased group says they play ‘genre bluegrass/folk/acoustic.

    On October 25 Speedwagon will be playing western swing. While G.I. is a bluegrass guy through and through, he doesn’t mind bending the rules a little for western swing.

    Then on November 15 the Coffey Brothers play. Google their name and you’ll find YouTube videos of them doing ‘Blessed’ and ‘Center of My Joy.’

    We’ll be sure to give you a reminder and all the pertinent information on the week of the events.

 

Music to live by

    The Richmond Community Orchestra (RCO) will soon celebrate the beginning of its seventh year of operation and is currently composed of musicians ranging in age from teenagers to octogenarians. It is a symphonic orchestra featuring strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion. 

    The primary thrust of the RCO is to allow musicians of varying skill levels to meet together on a regular basis and have the joy of playing a variety of orchestral music together as well as hone their instrumental skills.  This is an opportunity that many have not had the occasion to do since high school or college (sometimes 30 or 40 years ago).          While a certain skill level is required, there are no “tryouts” to become a member of the RCO although there are some restrictions on the number of players that can be accommodated in certain sections in order to maintain a musical balance across the orchestra. 

    There is always a need for specialty woodwinds (bassoon, oboe, etc.), as well as some brass players, especially horn players, and there is a constant shortage of string players – violin, viola, cello, bass.

    The RCO will begin rehearsals for this next year beginning September 8 (the second Monday in September).  Rehearsals will be held each Monday thereafter from 6:30 to 8:30 in the evening at the Goddard Auditorium in Carpenter Hall on the Earlham College Campus. 

Virginia Claypool Meredith


Peeking into ‘herstory’ in Cambridge City

    Cambridge City is preparing for Canal Days which is the weekend of September 6 and 7. This is a street party with lots of live music and it’s a great opportunity to re-visit Cambridge City and loop back into their version of Antique Alley again.

    We are informed by a reliable source that on Sunday, September 14th between 2 and 4 pm there will be the dedication of an Indiana Historical Marker to Virginia Claypool Meredith.

    Raised on a farm near Connersville, at 33 she was widowed and took on the management of her husband’s family farm near Cambridge City. Her pioneering work in agriculture led her to be the first speaker at Purdue’s Farmers’ Institute in 1889. For her lifelong advocacy of this new role of women in agriculture she was named “Queen of American Agriculture” by the State of Mississippi.


This 1940 Packard-Darrin convertible was made in Connersville


Packard-Darrin vies for finest looking Connersville car

    We thought the Cord was the finest looking car every made in Connersville, but now that we’ve seen pictures of the Packard-Darrin, we’re not so sure. They’re sleek, they’re stylish (still), they’re built on the Packard chassis, they’re semi-custom and today they are rare.

    Here’s what we’ve gathered about the car’s short history in Connersville: ‘Dutch’ Darrin knew his semi-custom Packard Darrins were going to sell more than he could produce in his small shop on Sunset Strip in Hollywood, so he made an arrangement with Roy Faulkner to use the almost defunct Auburn Motor Car Company to produce 1940 Packard Darrins at the Auburn plant in Connersville.

    But Auburn was closing its automotive division by the end of 1940 and Darrin couldn’t find production facilities in Detroit, so he turned to Sayers and Scoville in Cincinnati who built hearse and flower cars.

    Dutch said, "Their directors were all on hand to watch the first 1941 Packard Darrin come off the line—followed closely by a hearse! It was quite a sight."

 

Other cars made in Connersville according to Cruise-in.com:

 

Ansted             Lexington Motor Car Co.        Connersville    1921,1926

Auburn            Auburn Automobile Co.         Connersville    1929-36

Cord                Cord Corp.                              Connersville    1936-37

Empire             Empire Motor Car Co.            Connersville    1912-15

Howard           Lexington-Howard Co.           Connersville    1913-14

Lexington        Lexington Motor Co.              Connersville    1910-27

McFarlan         McFarlan Motor Car Co.        Connersville    1910-28

Packard Darrin  Packard Motor Car Co.         Connersville    1940-41

Pak-Age-Car   Auburn Automobile Co.         Connersville    1938-41

Van Auken Electric     Connersville Buggy Co.  Connersville 1913


Franklin County Tourism’s first innkeepers conference a ‘success’

By Gary A. Schlueter

 

    In a pioneering effort to grow the county’s tourism industry, Franklin County Convention, Recreation and Visitor Commission (aka Tourism) held an Innkeepers Conference last Monday. FCCRVC has 14 registered innkeepers and four of them were represented in this initial effort at networking and generally learning to work together.

    In addition several local attractions were represented including Metamora, the Franciscan Center and Haspin Acres.

    Haspin Acres has been using Tourism’s website to promote their periodic public activities. Mikel Beck, coordinator of the event, said they talked about how to improve that presence in order to make it more user friendly, specifically by including information the general public needs to know to decide if they want to attend something otherwise labeled ‘Mud Bog/DJ’. 

    The event was held at the Ivy Tech campus in Batesville and the lucky four innkeepers who attended learned from Nancy Belvli of Ivy Tech how to capitalize on social media like Facebook, Trip Advisor and Twitter.

    The second session provided the local attractions in Franklin County to network with the innkeepers.  Each attraction was allowed 10 minutes to present a brief statement about their businesses. In the third session the innkeepers and vendors mixed and mingled over dessert.

    Jo Ball from Metamora Inn said she wished more county innkeepers would have attended. She was impressed with the information about social media and was looking forward to applying it to her business. She said she came away knowing more about the Franciscan Center in Oldenburg and brought some brochures from the Center for her guests.

    She and Mikel Back talked afterwards about making this an annual event. One potential item they discussed for the next agenda was how to improve the county’s Tourism website so it may better serve the innkeepers.

    According to Mikel Beck, the conference was a success.  “Everyone went away learning something and that is all you can ask for,” she said.


 Issue 162 

August 12-18, 2014

 

Opry Barn Bluegrass

    Cave Mountain Bluegrass Band will be back in Metamora on Saturday, but this time instead of playing in a cave (the old blacksmith shop on Columbia and Clayborn Streets), they will play in the aptly named Opry Barn on not so aptly named Pennington Road. West Main Street might be a better name since the road exists to be Main Street, Metamora.

    Since the July opening of the Opry Barn, which might also carry other names, the stage has been moved to a much better location. We saw it at the Gold Mine Pickers concert a few Mondays back. We also expect other signs of growing as Metamora Performing Arts spreads its wings and begins to really take off. Their first play is getting close to staging.

    Cave Mountain are from Northern Kentucky and producer G.I. Ball calls them as close to a touring professional band as you can get. Their love for what they do shines through in their performance if the old blacksmith shop show was any indicator.

 

Art, music, beer and bacon festival

    Walhill Farm is willing to try new stuff. A few years ago they created a farmers market which operated for one season, then was gone. This weekend (Friday through Sunday) Walhill Farm is hosting Bacon, Blues & Brew, Music and Arts Festival.

    It promises some fairly big name talent like Michael Kelsey, Anders Osborne and Parker Milsap, who individually (and in order) cover folk, rock and country. Other names - Honey Honey, The Main Squeeze, Leftover Cuties and Rev. Peton’s Big Damn Band - will be providing, the website says, jazz, blues, bluegrass, funk, and soul, not necessarily in that order.

    We’d like to tell you who was playing when but there was no schedule on the website and two telephone calls failed to find out. Neither do we know when the Festival will open each day, but that just tests our extra sensory perception and that’s never bad. You’ll have to go when the spirit hits you and hope for the best.

    The Festival includes an art booth market which is free for the wandering through, but the music is pay as you go, apparently. Craft beer made locally, which probably means in the Whitewater Valley, will be on hand or in hand if you’re so inclined.

    By the name of the festival, the food will probably be heavily inspired by bacon, which by itself is good reason for one of those beers. Bacon and beer and spotless fine art in an upscale attitude is what you’ll find at Walhill Farm this weekend. And then there’s all that music.

 

"Touching the Earth"

    An art show opening next Monday at Earlham College’s Leeds Gallery sounds interesting. The sculpting team of Roger Asay and Rebecca Davis present natural materials in a raw form as the subject as well as the substance of work. Each installation piece is a sculpture in its own right, but they arrange them in the space so that viewers feel that they are walking within a whole art experience, somewhat like moving through a Zen garden.

 

A lesson from South Bend

    Under the headline,‘Studebaker driving tour,’ Indiana Landmarks August newsletter describes a trip through the old Studebaker plant in Southbend. We couldn’t help noticing how much was being made from the Studebaker brand.

    “The day includes visits to not-open-to the-public sites, including the Administration building (left) and assembly plant -- soon to be repurposed as a data hub and lofts -- as well as the Studebaker Museum and Tippecanoe Place, a restaurant in the Romanesque Revival-style mansion built for Clem Studebaker.”

    We also couldn’t help thinking of Connersville and the many brands it contains in its automotive history. Where’s their museum? Where is their driving tour? Where are their repurposed remains?

    The Studebaker tour is Saturday, September 27. Contact Indiana Landmarks for more information.

 

Richmond rich in auto history

  Car lovers in the Whitewater Valley would be wise to plan an outing to the Wayne County Historical Museum before the bucket list runs dry. According to Jim Harlan the museum has examples of nine of the 14 cars once made in Richmond. “This represents working for 50 years, buying up any car made in Richmond.”

    Car lovers, especially Indiana car lovers, might want to keep this research tool handy - http://www.cruise-in.com/resource/cisbuilt.htm. It is Cruise-in.com’s list of “198 Indiana-built automobiles produced in 42 cities and towns.” It lists 10 cars built in Connersville and 10 cars built in Richmond. Here are the Richmond cars:

 

Crosley            Crosley Motors Inc.            1939-42

Davis                        George W. Davis Motor Car Co.            1908-29

Laurel                        Laurel Motor Car Co.            1916-17

Lorraine            Lorraine Car Co.                        1920-21

New York Six                        Automotive Corp. of America            1927-28

Pilot                        Pilot Motor Car Co.                        1909-24

Richmond            Wayne Works                        1904-17

Rodefeld            Rodefeld Co.                        1909-17

Seidel                        Seidel Buggy Co.                        1908-09

Westcott            Westcott Motor Car Co.            1909-16

 

Forest Service grants

    What’s that about the second shoe dropping? In the world of Indiana open space, the enhancement thereof, the first shoe was Governor Pence’s dropping $30 million on creating conservation land in Indiana and now the US Forest Service drops the next one.  

    Usually, Federal droppings are much larger than their state equivalents, but in this case it’s the opposite. Where Governor Pence invested $30 million in wildlife and nature preservation, U.S. Forest Service is making $1.6 million available and since it is for programs across the 50 states and umpteen territories to all “local governments, qualified nonprofit organizations and Indian tribes” if everyone got a fair share, we’d be measuring each piece of new conservation land in square feet.

    In the Federal Register of August 6, 2014 it is called Community Forest and Open Space Conservation Program (CFP) probably because the acronym for the whole name sounds a little like a controlled sneeze.

    Per the Register: “The purpose of the program is to establish community forests by protecting forest land from conversion to non-forest uses and provide community benefits. Some of these benefits include sustainable forest management; clean air, water, wildlife habitat, and other environmental benefits: forest-based educational programs; service as models of effective forest stewardship; and recreational benefits secured with public access.”

    So public access is built in as is the concept of forest as classroom. This is a a 50/50 grant which means they’ll pay for half of a winning application. It is a competitive grant program and the deadline for application is January 16, 2015. In our region we would get it to Neal Bungard in Durham, New Hampshire.

    If you don’t fancy a visit you might call him at 603 868-7604 or email nbungard@fs.fed.us. For questions about the application and process contact Maya Solomon 202 205-1376 or mayasolomon@fs.fed.us.

    Grants cannot exceed $400,000 and the land must be at least five acres and be 75 percent forested. The lands must also be threatened by conversion to non-forest use and must be offered for sale by a willing seller. The amount of threat a parcel of land is facing will probably be a key factor determining who wins a grant.

    While it is a very small amount considering the threat, say rather the experience we have of forest being devoured by our ever-spreading civilization, those in the trenches fighting for the wild might see it as a step in the right direction by the U.S. Forest Service, if only a baby step.

 

Spotlight Farmers Market

    Sometimes tomatoes can get the best of you, or nearly get the best of you. It that time is now it’s time to freeze or can that excess. But another great wintertime tomato treat is sun-dried tomatoes. It takes 10 to 20 hours, according to one website, in a conventional over at 150 degrees. This source also recommends putting the sliced tomatoes in a flat pan on the dashboard of your car from sunup to sunset. Repeat as necessary.

    Of course a dehydrator made just for this kind of thing gives you the best control, especially the ones with controls like timers and thermostats. But 10 to 20 hours of baking costs money and heats up the house. There must be some Mother Earth solution.

    So we searched Mother Earth News and found the first one: Making Sun-Dried Tomatoes in a Solar Food Dehydrator. The writer bought a kit and assembled it in five hours. Since she began in October there was not enough sun to complete her first attempt. After two days of sunshine and two days of rain her tomatoes began to mildew.

    If anyone has any insight they’d like to share on solar food dehydration email me garyaschlueter@gmail.com.

    If you are in need of tomatoes to experiment with, stop at the Oxford Farmers Market on Saturday from 8 am until noon at their Uptown Parks location in Oxford, Ohio.

Best of Show-Photo

by Kimberly Toros

Issue 161 draft

August 5-11, 2014


Preble County Fair Visual Arts Best of Show Winners

    Well over 200 entries were made in the Visual Arts Department at the Preble County Fair which included Fine Art and Photography. Entries came from every age and multiple communities.

    In the Artwork category, the Best of Show award went to Patty Emerson, First Runner Up to Phillip Erbaugh and Second Runner Up went to Madison Perry. In the Photography category, Best of Show was awarded to Kimberly Toros, First Runner Up to Mariah Squire and Second Runner Up went to Kimberly Vonder Mueullen.

    Vicky Fanberg, executive director of the Preble County Art Association said, “The fair is such a great opportunity for the community to share their talents. This year was exceptional with the quality and creativity of every entry. I would like to encourage more people to enter next year and stay involved in the arts throughout the year.”


CBMA news

    Amos Collins sent us Connersville Bluegrass Music Association’s music schedule for the next two months and while there are plenty of old favorites like New Out Look Bluegrass playing again September fifth and Vernon McIntyre’s Applachian Grass on September 26, there are new names like Mark Poe Bluegrass Band and Berachah Valley, an all female bluegrass band out of Dayton.

    We’ve also fine tuned the location of CBMA this year from the James R. Roberts Building in Roberts Park to 30th Street and Park Road which might be good for a digital map search, but it only gets you to the corner where Roberts Park is. The rest of the finding, as before, is up to you. But then Roberts Park is a fine place to explore. Plenty of Connersville culture thereabouts, a Kennedy brothers covered bridge and great rock work curbs.

    And while we’re sharing news about CBMA, the admission price has been raised by two bucks, from $6 to $8. It used to be one of those easy memory things, six bucks at six o’clock, but now it’s eight bucks at six o’clock. Wonder how many people will miss the first two sets now?

 

Eaton oinkers paint the pig contest

    Where Brookville has its chickens painted, costumed and decorated in a people’s choice kind of way, Eaton is going to have pigs, ten of them to be exact. The Visual Arts Center of Preble County is teaming up with The Preble County Pork Festival to decorate the town with ten painted concrete pigs.

    But whereas Brookville’s chickens are as permanent as a concrete statue can be, after they’re painted by teams of no more than five, the Eaton oinkers will be raced to the Preble County Pork Festival.

    The press release from PCAA&VAC says, “Once your chosen piggy is painted and displayed for all to see around the town, then it is off to the races as they will be moved to the Preble County Pork Festival in front of the Rotary Junction for judging.” It sounds almost as though those teams of five will not only paint the pig but race them to Rotary Junction. Probably only my over active imagination.

    Design teams have to submit their designs for consideration and submit an entry form by August 8th. The winning pig will earn its painter $100, with 2nd place earning $75, and 3rd earning $50. Entry forms are available at www.takepartinart.net or call 937 456-3999.

 

Welcome new teachers with the Guide

    New teachers are in, old teachers are out and the Guide just keeps rolling along. The Guide has many, many teachers who are subscribers, but each year some move on and we have no way of knowing who the new ones are.

    So, if you are a teacher and you get and enjoy the Guide each week, here’s what I’d like you to do: Saunter up to one of the new teachers in your school and tell them about the Guide. Tell them how many wonderful new opportunities it has uncovered for you and suggest that this newbie subscribe.

    Do it for them, if necessary. It’s free and they will be forever in your debt which is not a bad thing for new comers for whom ‘forever’ may not be as long as it is for folks like you and me.

 

Trails and money

    Everything we do these days seems to need to be justified by some economic benefit, not least of these things are trails. People who have no experience with them wonder how such a passive thing can generate revenue. It has to do with the active people who use the trail. Money comes out of their pocket.

    A ten year old study of a 45-mile long trail in Virginia counted 1.6 million users of the trail who pumped $5.3 million into the local economy directly related to the use of the trail.

    Nearer to home, in 2009 the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission found, trails in the Miami Valley of Ohio attract 1 million visitors every year who spend up to $16 million on goods and services related to use of the trail. Those numbers have probably risen in the past five years.

    The relative cost of creating trails is low. “Making walking and biking safer and more accessible is relatively inexpensive,” said US Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood in 2010. “We could upgrade the entire 2,250 mile East Coast Greenway for only one-fifth of a single I-95 bridge over the Potomac.”

    Studies also found in most cases the closer you are to a trail the more your property value increases. Bill Ruthhart of the Indianapolis Star reported, “It may not have sand and crashing waves, but the Monon Trail is the equivalent of beachfront property in the Indianapolis area.”

    Along the Monon Trail in Indianapolis, otherwise identical houses are worth 11% more for every half mile closer to the trail, according to the report by Rory Robinson, Outdoor Recreation Partner for the National Park Service from which these stats were lifted. He reported, in Minneapolis-St. Paul, for every 400 meters closer a median-priced home is to an off-street bicycle facility, its value increases by $510.

    The reason housing values rise the nearer you are to a trail is because of what the trail means to the homeowner. A 2001 Indiana Trails study found over 70% of trail neighbors reported using the trail during the prior 12 months. In that same study 85.5% of the trail users interviewed saw the trail as safe.

    But economics can only go so far in measuring the value of trails in communities. They improve the health of folks who use them and while this has an economic component in lower overall health care costs, its greatest result is in the joy of being healthy itself.

    And in the mysterious realm of place, trails play a big part in attracting and keeping people. A Gallup and Knight Foundation study in 2008 found three main qualities attach people to place: social offerings like entertainment and places to meet, a welcoming openness and the area’s aesthetics like physical beauty, green space and trails.

    Trails take us to those green spaces and show as that physical beauty, and when it begins at your front door, all the better. More trails mean more benefits, economic and otherwise.

 

Spotlight: Farmers Markets

     Did you know Oxford Farmers Market usually has a local chef stop by and prepare something from the stuff he finds at the market that day? Last week it was Kona Bistro chef Patrick Nipper. Market manager Larry Slocum said Chef Nipper’s “wonderful surprise” would be ready around 10 o’clock which may give you a hint as to when the sweet spot is at the Oxford Farmers Market any given Saturday.

 


 

Goldmine Pickers

Issue 160 

July 29-August 4, 2014

 

MPA offers special Monday night concert

    Last week, we mentioned Harrison’s Summer Concert series being held on Tuesdays and said ‘Why not music on Tuesday evening, or Monday afternoon for that matter?’ (Although it seems we forgot the question mark in the original.)

    This week we have news to fit the bill:

    Goldmine Pickers will be stopping by Metamora on Monday on their way home from their current Southeastern US tour.  Since their website lists the quartet’s various homes as St. Louis, Rockford, Michigan, Goshen and Fort Wayne, Indiana, Metamora is a natural jumping off spot if they are traveling by horseback which they probably aren’t.

    Our friend Cary Allen Fields of The Fields of Bluegrass Radio Hour said they are ‘pure and unpretentious, anything but over-produced, and technically brilliant.’

    The Goldmine Pickers will playing at the new Opry Barn on Pennington Road in Metamora. They begin at seven for $6 per which, as you see, makes up the ‘Per’ part of Metamora Performing Arts.


Block party for library’s 150th birthday

    Morrisson-Reeves Library is celebrating its 150th birthday this Wednesday with a block party, music, magic and more. North 6th Street in Richmond will be the site of this five or six hour party which starts at 3 pm with lots of kids stuff like an inflatable obstacle course, 17-foot tall slide, face painting and goodie bags.

    The next segment runs from 4 to 6 pm with the official kick-off and dedication of the Reading Garden. The magic will be provided by Tony Truitt and the music by Dave Snow and Eric Loy. There will also be a vintage car cruise-in. At 7 pm the popular duo Garcia and Scott will perform.

 

Connersville’s history getting noticed

    We found this report from Indiana Landmarks Eastern Regional Office:

    “Established just four years ago, Connersville’s Historic Preservation Commission has made great strides toward advancing historic preservation in the community. Building on the recent restoration of the James R. Roberts Memorial Building and the listing of Roberts Park in the National Register of Historic Places, the commission has set its sights on nominating the city’s historic commercial district to the National Register.

    “Assisted by a matching grant from Indiana Landmarks’ Partners in Preservation Program (PIP), the commission will hire a professional to complete the nomination. Listing in the National Register qualifies properties in the district for federal preservation tax credits, a restoration incentive for building owners and developers.”

 

Music in (the real) Miami

    Miami Township’s Summer Concert Series starts this Saturday with Ooh LaLa & and The Greasers playing good old rock & roll. It looks like a two-concert series with the second one being August 15 when the Sullman Janszen Band will play.

    Both concerts are free and start at 7:30 pm and both will be at the Miami Township Community Center, 3780 Shady Lane in North Bend, Ohio. The concerts are planned for outdoors but if it rains they will move inside the beautiful community center.

    According to Terry Simpson, director the Harrison-Symmes Museum, the museum will be running split-the-pot at both concerts. “This is a major fund-raiser for the museum,” he wrote.

 

Connersville Bluegrass moves to Roberts Park

    Good Lord willin’ and the creeks don’t rise, Connersville Bluegrass Music Association could be up and running in their new location by this Friday, according to CBMA President Amos Collins. On short notice, they had to move out of their former location at 2600 Western Avenue and the stress and strain of doing so landed him in the hospital for a few days.

    “They took two gallons of water out of me,” he said.

    CBMA has been without a home since around June 1st. The last band to play at the old location was Tony Holt and The Wildwood Valley Boys on Friday, May 30th, according to the Whitewater Valley Guide entertainment calendar. The first band at the new home of bluegrass music in Connersville will be New Outlook Bluegrass Band. Amos said they usually play on the first Friday of the month.

    The new location at the James R. Roberts Memorial Building at Roberts Park took some negotiations with Connersville City Council, Amos said. They want him to carry liability insurance which is going to be an extra burden for CBMA, but not an insurmountable one.

 

Cedar Grove Bridge nominated for National Listing

    At their meeting in Indianapolis last Wednesday, the Indiana Historic Preservation Review Board agreed to nominate the one-hundred year old Cedar Grove Bridge for the National List of Historic Places. Two years ago that same board gave the Indiana Department of Transportation permission to demolish the bridge. The possibility of demolition is still hanging over the heads of the group that would like to save the bridge, the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge.

    J.P. Hall, eastern regional manager for Indiana Landmarks, is a member of the Friends and attended the Review Board meeting on Wednesday on their behalf. In an email afterwards he wrote, “The Review Board approved recommending nominating the Bridge to the National List. There was one dissenting vote. . . Regardless, the recommendation will be set to the National Park Service and the Bridge will be listed.”

    Inclusion in the National List of Historic Places does not protect the Cedar Grove Bridge from demolition, but it does raise the profile of the potential action.

 

Big Four Café a Batesville must

    We really can’t say enough good things about the new Big Four Café in Batesville. The original Big Four Café was a rough and tumble place where bikers and railroaders rubbed elbows with locals. People who remember the original say it was a drinking place not so much and eating place.

    The new Big Four Café is just the opposite. It may be the premiere eating place in Batesville, but it doesn’t have a license to sell even beer and wine. That’s because it is too close to a church, according to Chef Adam Israel. And in Batesville where people have been known to judge distances by how many six packs it takes to get there, that can be problematic.

    Big Four Café is located in the RomWeber Flats building on Depot Street and is highly recommended for its fresh, original food. According to its website, the Big Four has been voted best place for breakfast and lunch in both Ripley and Franklin Counties.

    We went in one day while doing laundry and feeling kind of blue, tried the soft shell shrimp tacos and left, amazingly and surprisingly happy. Yes, at the Big Four Café food brings happiness. Just reading the chalkboard burger menu lifts you up and reminds you, life is full of so many possibilities.

    We initially tried the New England style bacon and corn chowder which brought us back for more. It is excellent. And because you can order half-sandwiches and cups of soup, you can keep your lunch well under ten bucks.

    The Big Four Café is sponsoring the Depot Street Party this Sunday from 5 to 10 pm. The group Hawthorne Heights will be performing but we can’t imagine they can top the food coming out of Chef Adam’s kitchen.

    Big Four Café and Izzy’s Catering

    121 S. Depot Street

    Batesville, In

    812 932-3687

 

Floating down the Whitewater

    Green Acres Canoe Rental got a nice bump from the Harrison Press. A story by Bob Hyle calls the Whitewater River “one of the great hidden assets of Harrison.” He said the Lutz family and Green Acres Canoe and Kayak has helped the river “become a major destination point for thousands of Greater Cincinnatians looking for summer recreation.”

    Green Acres allows you to explore the lower part of the Whitewater from their place on Suspension Bridge Road. Sharon Lutz said the company rep who sells them their equipment “says we are the fastest growing canoe rental operation in the country.” Big words with big meanings for our hidden gem of a river.

    By our last count you could rent canoes and kayaks at River Rats Canoe and Kayak at Robinson’s Whitewater River Campground in Connersville, at Whitewater Canoe Rental in Brookville and Cedar Grove and Morgan Canoe Center in Brookville. For phone numbers and more info click here.

 

New WCT trail under discussion

    When he was a young fellow, Dave Henninger earned a Boy Scout Merit Badge hiking the towpath trail approximately 16 miles from Laurel to Brookville. He said the Boy Scouts, who met in the old Laurel Academy, also used to do a half-hike, half-canoe trail along the same route. “In those days they were holding boat races on the Whitewater Canal from Laurel to Metamora,” he said.

    A little over half-century later a large portion of that same trail will be open again, though at this time it is being planned from Metamora to Laurel Feeder Dam. The feeder dam is about a mile from the town of Laurel along Dam Road and about six miles from Metamora.

    “There really isn't much detail on the new trail at this point, though it will go to the feeder dam, not to Laurel,” Terry Duffy wrote. He is vice president of Whitewater Canal Trail, Inc., the group which from its start envisioned opening the trail from Laurel to Brookville again.

    WCT opened the first segment of the Metamora to Brookville trail on April 10, 2004. In the intervening decade it opened and maintains another section of the trial near Yellow Bank Creek. Property issues have slowed the effort in that direction, but after ten years of trying, in April the Whitewater Valley Railroad agreed to meet regarding the “possibility of a trail to the feeder dam along the canal/railroad corridor,” Mr. Duffy said.

    “A committee of railroad and Canal Trail representatives addressed a couple of questions over the following weeks,” he said. “At this point, all have agreed in principle that a trail is possible and desirable but no decision has been made about the location of the final trail route.”

    One concept is to have the trail follow the old canal towpath, but this gets a little dicey at a place called the old ice pond where the canal verges away from the railroad. It would mean getting permission from private property owners who were not part of these initial meetings.

    Having the railroad and the State Historic Site along with DNR’s Outdoor Recreation Division in on the plan means the stakeholders who own the easements between the canal and the railroad track are in agreement and between them there is plenty of room for a trail.

    Mr. Duffy said the first step is a rough-in trail. “This will be a rough path that will enable us to get into the likely trail area so we can figure out where the trail could be located and how it might be built. That work will start this fall.”

 

Issue 159

July 22-28, 2014


Hagerstown Flying Circus

    Ready for your annual short notice flight of fantasy? Well, today it’s Hagerstown Flying Circus and you don’t even need to hurray. Say you live in Liberty and work until five. That gives you one hour to drive to Hagerstown Regional Airport and take in the Flying Circus. It is a gathering of vintage airplanes and if you’re lucky, Model T automobiles. Then there’s the interaction of those two with the crowd of folks more normal in their collecting habits. It’s a recipe for fun and it works every time.

 

Premier class manufacturing

    I talked to a collector of automobiles, Studebakers to be exact, and said I gathered from here, there, and everywhere that Packards and MacFarlans were on the same level. He straightened me out pdq. MacFarlans were the superior in quality and price, he said.

    In other words, the MacFarlan was the premiere class American automobile at the time, and the time was in many ways the classic period of American car manufacturing.  

    The MacFarlan were a posh coach harkening back to the horse and buggy days when McFarlan custom built carriages. They took few precautions for and paid little heed to the laminar flow. The coach was just that, an elegant box on wheels upright and upstanding like the citizens who owned them and rode inside, folks like Al Capone and Fatty Arbuckle.

    The point of this is, the MacFarlan was made in Connersville. It’s a Whitewater Valley product and mark that, it’s a superior automobile that was not simply of world class standards, it set world class standards. Yeah, one of ours here in the Valley.

    See for yourself sometime. Don your highest crowned hat because the ceiling of the MacFarlan will still hover over it and check out a prime example of a MacFarlan at Fayette County Historical Museum, 103 Vine Street in East Connersville though they don’t call it ‘East’ anymore officially. The number of MacFarlans existing in the world today might be around a dozen so seeing one in the town in was built is no insignificant thing.

    It is a good idea to call first because they have limited public hours. They will probably be gracious enough to arrange something with you. Call 765 825-1523.

    Custom Built by McFarlan is a book written by Connersville resident automobile historian Richard A. Stanley. Walmart carries it for $56.93 but we recommend you buy it at the Fayette County Historical Museum. It’s somehow more authentic that way.

 

Sharing musical styles

    The creative minds in Richmond keep coming up with new ways to showcase music. The latest is Local Musician’s Showcase. It’s ‘like nothing we’ve done before,’ say the producers. It starts with ‘the local symphony orchestra by the Glen Miller Park pond.’ The producers don’t say which local symphony orchestra, so in turn we won’t name the producers on the principal that one good slight deserves another.

    At the end of their performance, concertgoers will be able to stroll through the park to listen to local musicians who will be placed in street-performer style. It all leads up to the main act. Lynn, Indiana native Jay Jesse Johnson playing in the Bandshell.

    The idea of having various local performers at spots around the park gives concertgoers a chance to stroll around and sample that talent. Starting off with a symphonic program and eliding into blues is the exciting part, breaking away from one style of music for an entire concert.

    It happens this Saturday from 7 to 10 pm in Glen Miller Park on Main Street in Richmond and it’s free.

 

Local Music Scene

-  Bright Community Festival has a big dollop of musical entertainment this year. They are featuring Pure Grain on Friday night and two bands on Saturday, Gen X and After Midnight.

-  It looks like someone’s started a free summer music series in Harrison, at the Harrison Community Center, to be exact where today, the ever-elusive Tuesday, Zack Attack plays at 7 pm.

    The rest of the Summer Concert schedule is The Tuna Project on August 5 and The Menus on August 19, all Tuesdays, which we kind of like for breaking the weekend mold. And why not music on Tuesday evening, or Monday afternoon for that matter. Live music that is, not canned. Speaking of cans, you are asked to bring one when you attend.

 

Twofer doubled

    If you’re into twofers and you like fast paced baseball, the Richmond River Rats are playing a double header against the Butler Bluesox this Saturday at McBride Stadium.         Butler is the only team in the Prospect League from Pennyslvania. For what it’s worth, Richmond and the Terre Haute Rex are the two Indiana teams in the league.

    First game starts at 5:05 and will last about two hours. So you’re looking at four hours of semi-pro ball for the price of two. That’s better than a twofer, that’s a twofer four.

 

Positive feedback

    The July 4th Celebration at the Gaar House was a rousing success, we are told by Sarah Bradley. “We sold over 300 tickets,” she wrote. After expenses for the event there are funds going towards maintenance of the Gaar House. She thanked the Guide for our coverage which was extensive because it’s such a cool thing. Symphony music then fireworks and all on a hilltop on a Summer’s evening. Seems too good to limit to one day per year.

    Sarah also said, Richmond Community Orchestra “RCO, Eaton Area Choir, Ryan and Donna and Jeff Templeton did a fantastic job!”

    Last week Sandra from Augusta, Georgia asked for information about the Valley.  “My husband and I travel all the country. He is a trucker, and we go on a lot of vacations just from the places we have driven through,” she wrote. She’s now a subscriber and maybe the next time they are trucking through they just might stop at one of our roadside attractions she read about in the Whitewater Valley Guide.

 

Vision for the Valley

    The visioning process is a proven success, but only when the key players buy into it. In the late ‘90s there was a flare of gatherings with names like Vision 20/20 Carpinteria, California. I was there after the visioning process was completed.

    This vision was large enough and far out enough to catch the imagination of almost every sector in the town. Education, transportation, sewage disposal, policing, streetscapes, parks and recreation, the farmers market were all topics in the ultimate booklet that was published with everyone’s consensus and distributed to all and sundry.

    This booklet led to immediate positive results and the positive momentum led to an increase in the delight of life and made Carpinteria a very desirable town to call home.

    Flash forward to 2014 and inland a few thousand miles to the Whitewater Valley and here we have the electronic opportunity to do the same thing. Will it work when things aren’t face to face?  We’ll never know ‘til we try.

    The Whitewater Canal Byway Association is developing a plan to protect and enhance the byway and its features. You have a chance to participate in the process by checking out the Association’s MindMixer page. You can log in quickly—even through Facebook—and help set goals for the byway’s future. You can also upload pictures and help identify great sites in the region.

     If you love the valley, appreciate its history, and want to be part of this visioning process, go to Vision for the Valley and share your ideas. 

 

Spotlight: Farmers Market

    How much of the county fair is the farmers market? And vice versa?

Probably not much on the ‘county’ side of the equation, but an awful lot on the ‘fair’ side. The best farmers markets are town fairs.

    They have music and food for sampling and bright colored handmade things, and still warm bread, and tomatoes whenever possible and corn as of last week and all the rest. At it’s best it feels like a fair. Check out Oxford Farmers Market this Saturday and see if they don’t fit the bill.

    Or if you want to work it the other way around, from the ‘fair’ side, check out the Fayette County Free Fair starting Saturday at noon and see how much of that is like the farmers market. There will certainly be ribbons hanging on things newly culled from the garden, but not a bushel below you might buy a sample from, which seems a missed opportunity to bring the market side to the fair.

    There is a string of county fairs rippling through the summer and each of them would be enhanced if produce could be sold. After all, that’s the real completion of the process of growing anything beyond what you intend to consume yourself (meaning you and extended you).


Gary August Schlueter

 

Vatican Ride

Issue 158

July 15, 21, 2014

 

Centerville Bicentennial happenings

    Centerville is featuring three concerts this week to celebrate its bicentennial. They are all in Maplewood Park at North Morton and East Water streets, all at 7 pm and all free. The first is Tuesday, the second is Thursday and the third, this one featuring The Bulldogs, is on Saturday.

    This is climax week for Centerville’s Bicentennial celebration and featured are the Historic Home Tour on Friday and Saturday, and a Civil War Reenactment on Saturday at the high school soccer field.

 

Jazz with frills

    And for something unusual on a Wednesday afternoon, try a new experience, jazz in the library. The Phil DeGreg Trio, and with a name like the Phil DeGreg Trio you know they’re playin’ jazz, is playing from two to three in the Oxford Lane Library. This could be one of those cornerstone events if a lot of ifs fall into place. First of all, if you have Wednesday afternoon free, then if you’ve been planning to experience Oxford again, and finally if the creeks don’t rise.

    What to do in Oxford? Something indoor would be the many museums or is it musea? Something outdoors would be the extensive Miami University trail system. Something indoors/outdoors would be shopping on Main Street, probably the only place you can buy Berkenstock sandals in the Whitewater Valley, btw.

    As we’ve said before, Oxford is not technically in the Whitewater Valley, but for that matter neither is one or both of the Baths. Sometimes more than watershed defines a valley. In this case a rectangle does, and part of Preble, Butler and Hamilton counties are in that imaginatively square boundary.    

    But I digress (a time or two), the point is jazz in the afternoon on Wednesday comes with some frills.

 

Summer Sun and Surf

    The Sunburners are playing Live in the Glen this Saturday. They bring their beach party music and highlight it with a steel pan band, we are told. Glen Miller Bandstand is on East Main in Richmond in Glen Miller Park.

    Then on the other side of the Whitewater Valley in Lawrenceburg on the Mighty Ohio, a band we love to remember the name of, Phil Dirt and the Dozers, are doing a tribute to the Beach Boys in a show called “Surf’s Up”. Phil and the boys are playing Music on the River Thursday at 7 for our favorite price, nothin’.

 

Hearthstone audition

    Folks who are planning to be in or around Metamora Wednesday evening, and if those folks are music lovers, would be wise to stop in at the Hearthstone. Slaven and Webb are auditioning for a gig at the Hearthstone. And yes, Virginia, auditioning for a gig is very much like playing a gig only for one you get paid and for the other you get applause.   

    Without the applause you probably wouldn’t pass the audition so . . .

    Anyway, both are very slick guitar players with Rick Webb being the best guitar player in Metamora and Robin Slavens being better than him. Rick said the reason for the audition is that no one knows them here in Franklin County, but back in Muncie no audition is necessary. They expect to start at seven in the Tiki Bar.

 

Freudenfest is the best

    At seven am, Freudenfest starts Saturday with exercise and plenty of it. Somewhere along the day the outdoor party part starts and continues until midnight. Freudenfest always lives up to its name, Friends Festival.

    As you wander the party grounds off Perlen Strasse you will find smiling faces only broken up by laughing faces, feeding faces and finally drinking faces. Then it’s back to smiling again. It’s a friendly place and lots of fun. Mike Wilhelm suggests, ‘Don’t miss Lauf Run.’ Sounds like a smile to me.

    The opening ceremony is at 5 pm on Friday and the party goes to midnight.

 

One for your bike bucket list

    Franklin County Vatican Ride is a little known bike route that encompasses nine Catholic churches or did when the colorful, two-sided Franklin County Tourism brochure was printed several years back. Now the churches are there but the Catholic part is gone.

    Still you probably won’t take on the Vatican Ride to see the Catholic spirit though it is still alive in the monuments those ardent early Catholics created brick by brick and row by row.

    The Vatican Ride starts in Oldenburg with #1 Holy Family Parish and #2 Sisters of St. Francis. It then heads directly west to Enochsburg, then up to Hamburg and back to Oldenburg. This short loop is around 14 miles and takes in St. John the Evangelist in E’Burg and St. Ann’s Church in H’burg.

    Six miles from Oldenburg is St. Mary-of-the-Rock Parish Church and another three and a half miles in Oak Forest you’ll see St. Cecilia of Roma Parish Church.  Both St. Mary and St. Cecilia were christened in 1844. A year later St. Michael Parish in Brookville was established. It is around five miles from Oak Forest. 

    The six-mile section from St. Michael to Holy Guardian Angel in Cedar Grove is probably the prettiest from beginning to end. It follows River Road on the west bank of the Whitewater River and crosses the Cedar Grove Bridge into Cedar Grove itself, then back again.

    The nine-mile trek to St. Peters starts with a hill most folks will have to walk up. Gobblers Knob is a riot to bike down, but I’ve never been able to bike up it on my 12-speed. Once at the top it’s smooth riding to St. Peters Church.

    Finally, there’s a ten-mile ride from St. Peters back to Oldenburg. The section from St. Peters to Oldenburg follows St. Peters Road which becomes Pine Road and goes positively wild when it crosses Blue Creek. There’s a low water ford and great natural slabs of limestone creating a series of small waterfalls or big cataracts. On the other side of the ford lanes have been cut through the bush where it looks like people camp out.

    Significant to bridge lovers is first of all the Stockheughter Covered Bridge over Salt Creek near Enochsburg. The Vatican Ride has you going through the bridge twice. Then of course there is twice over Cedar Grove Bridge, which we hope will join the Stockheughter and the Snow Hill Covered Bridge as Franklin County representatives on the National List of Historic Places.

    This long loop is around 40 miles; so all toll, the Vatican Ride is roughly 54 miles.

    You have my permission to look upon it as your duty to take this ride, because taking the Vatican Ride will breathe live into those churches and give hope to those communities now deprived of their spiritual core.

    We at the Whitewater Valley Guide believe the folks who printed this brochure would serve its purpose better if the Vatican Ride was an officially designated bike route. This would not take much except permission from the Franklin County Commission and signage. The route is there and the brochure is already promoting it.

 

Spotlight: Farmers Market

    The reason we’re not hearing so much about local foods and growing our own or buying our neighbors is that it’s already tomatoes. In other words, it’s not so much a time to grow it, but a time to eat it, and we all know you shouldn’t talk with your mouth full.

    In other words, this is Farmers Market High Season. Larry Slocum said he expects sweet corn to start showing up this Saturday at Oxford Farmers Market.

 

And furthermore, there’s feedback needed

    The seed for the Whitewater Valley Guide was sown by the Whitewater Canal Byway Association through their mission and the scope of their vision.

    The Whitewater Valley is our home region, not any particular county. Our county is part of the region but the region is the greater thing. It is important for us to take possession of the entire region in the sense of realizing this greater unity.  We are citizens of the Whitewater Valley. We have that in common. Let’s exploit it, mutually. Mutual exploitation is one of the laws of karma.

    To that end, the Whitewater Canal Scenic Byway Association is creating a plan to help promote and preserve the valley’s unique historic resources. We’re looking to engage you, the residents, business owners, and other stakeholders of the communities along the Byway and ask for opinions about the Byway. 

    Tell us what you think. Visit: http://visionforthevalley.mindmixer.com/login

Cow Pasture

Ray Hassard

Issue 157 draft

July 8-14, 2014

 

Calling artists and photographers

    The Preble County Fair is calling for area artists to enter their work in a juried exhibit which will net $100 to the Best of Show. Details of how and when and where are at www.preblecountyfair.org. The show is being sponsored by the Preble County Art Association.


Centerville party’s like it’s 1814

    Centerville takes center stage in the Whitewater Valley Guide this week. That’s because Centerville is celebrating its 200th birthday over the next two weeks. Go to Centerville at random and you’ll probably find something going on. This will be a prime time to shoot some pictures of this picturesque town.

    Certainly the Centerville Library will be open for random guests. In fact, a new book about the 200-year history of Centerville is on sale there for $25.

    This Saturday and Sunday Historic Centerville is hosting the fifth annual Garden and Home Tour. There will be a city garden and four country gardens, all in the Centerville area. One of the gardens features a man cave in a barn, we are told. If you want to wax philosophical, a barn has always been a sort of man cave, at least with bachelor farmers.

    The Petal and Stem Garden Club is hosting a boutique at one of the properties. An historic farmhouse has been renovated on Willow Grove Road and will be open for garden-tourers.

    Tickets are $10 each and available at the Mansion House at 214 E Main Street in Centerville on the days of the event.

 

What a cornhole tournament reveals

    The cannons won’t thunder, but the ‘war’ to claim the title Wayne County Seat will be fought this Sunday. Instead of bullets there will be a cornhole tournament and presumably the winners and losers will celebrate with an ice cream social at the Wayne County Courthouse in Richmond.

    Since this ‘March on Richmond’ is hosted by the Centerville Bicentennial Committee it tells us who won the original ‘war’ back in 1873, and it says the good people of Centerville are forgiving, unless, like Pontiac and his siege of Fort Mackinaw using the ruse of an Indian ball game to get inside, those same people are planning something really historic for their town’s 200th birthday.

 

Belle of the Blues in Oxford

    A few weeks ago we wrote about Lisa Biales and her performance on Woodsongs Old Time Radio Hour and said we’d let you know when the ‘Belle of the Blues’ will be playing in the Whitewater Valley again. Well, Thursday evening is you next chance to catch this late rising star. Lisa Biales and the Belle of the Blues Band are the featured group this week at the Oxford Summer Music Festival. Judging by her performance on national television, we think this program will be something worth hearing.

 

Bye Bye Birdie debuts at the Murray

     You’d think in a theater town like Richmond ‘Bye Bye Birdie’ would have been produced at least once, but according to the folks at Richmond Civic Theatre, this Friday will be RCT’s ‘first-ever’ production of the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical.

    The play is set in the 1950s in a world driven mad by rock and roll in general but Elvis Presley in particular. When Elvis was drafted it caused such a stir, that playwright Michael Stewart based an entire production on it. Instead of Elvis, Conrad Birdie is the rock star about to be shorn of his locks and dressed in olive-drab. The musical is based on his farewell trip to a small Ohio town.

    The RCT production at the Murray Theatre will run for the next two weekends with Sunday matinees at 2 pm.

 

Tom Butters one man show

    Tom Butters has been emerging as a painter since moving from a world of advertising work in 2007. “I painted perhaps 10 pictures over a 40-year career, because I thought every painting had to be ‘important,’ had to depict a scene of deep meaning wrenched from my inner self.” 

    In 2007 he attended a Hoosier Salon painting workshop in New Harmony, taught by California impressionist Ken Auster.  “After twenty minutes of watching Ken work, I realized I was overthinking the process and making it much harder than it had to be,” he said. 

    You have until July 18th to see Tom Butters’ one man show at IU East’s Whitewater Hall Community Room. Butters is a cornerstone of the art community in Wayne County having founded Hagerstown Arts Place in 2009 as an adjunct of the Hagerstown Museum of which he is manager.

    He was also one of the first painters to teach at Room 912 in Richmond which opened recently. He won Richmond Art Museum’s prestigious Best of Show in 2007 and among other places has had a one man show there.

 

WCET program features Whitewater Valley

    Metamora got a jolt of television publicity on Monday evening when WCET aired ‘Have Steam Engine Will Travel.’ The half-hour segment of this on-going reality-on-rails program features the Gramlings, a father and son team, who own Flagg Coal Company. They have four steam engines and transport them wherever they can find a receptive short-line.

    In the Whitewater Valley that was the Whitewater Valley Railroad which along with Connersville, was featured prominently in Monday’s program. Also featured was Joanne Williams who explained the history of Metamora while she ground meal in the grist mill. She explained how the railroad bought the canal property in the 1860s and used the towpath for their rail bed.

    Engineer Francis Parker was the spokesman for the Whitewater Valley Railroad. He said using the former towpath of the railroad had one little problem. “Every time the canal has one of these locks to lift the boat, there had to be a steep little grade,” he said. “Nowadays as you go down the track, passengers and certainly the engineers feel that little change in grade.”

    Catrina and the Baggy Bottom Boys got their moment of fame, too, singing ‘This Train’ and getting all their names listed in the credits.

    For someone who lives in Metamora, seeing our town on the small screen was very interesting. In fact, it looks a lot better on TV than it does in real life, not unlike many TV stars, I’m told.

    Along with Metamora being featured in this mini-travelogue, Grand Central Station in Connersville gets a mention and some screen time, along with the Laurel Fire Department which had to help out with 650 gallons of water. Later they take the train to Laurel Hotel for dinner and along the way the cowboys have a shoot out or two.

    Barney Gramling said, “Metamora’s a really unique little town. Everything here’s very historic. Sadie’s probably the newest thing in town.”

    Sadie is Flagg Coal Company’s engine #126 which came into town two years ago when this episode was filmed to celebrate National Train Day. This happens on the Saturday before Mother’s Day and is an opportunity Metamora doesn’t really take enough advantage of.

    The Whitewater Valley Railroad has been trying to get Metamora to use this early May weekend as the start of their high tourist season, but so far, no takers. Maybe this public television program will awaken the merchants to the national publicity that is their’s for the taking.

 

Update: Cedar Grove Bridge

    A lot of water has flowed under Cedar Grove Bridge in the past week. In the process of finishing up requirements related to obtaining their certificate of approval to demolish the bridge, INDOT sent around the photo documentation that was required and their email distribution was wide. It included Mark Dollase of Indiana Landmarks who replied asking for someone at INDOT to clarify the status of this project.

    This was followed a few hours later by an email from JP Hall also of Indiana Landmarks and who has been with this project from the first meeting on the bridge in August 2001. He wrote, “The local group, Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge, has been trying to communicate with INDOT for some time and with much difficulty.”

    He also brought up the question of Federal permits, specifically Army Corps of Engineers Section 106 and Section 404 of the Clean Water Act of 1972. Afterwards he provided them with questions like how can you tear down a bridge you say may be owned by Franklin County?

    This specific question brought a short email from the commissioners of Franklin County saying, “To Whom It May Concern: Franklin County does not own Cedar Grove Bridge.” A newspaper report in the Brookville Democrat of October 9, 1930 documents the transfer from Franklin County to the State Highway System of SR 1 from Cedar Grove to Lawrenceburg. This would have included all bridges along SR 1, Cedar Grove Bridge being the first from a north/south perspective.

    It also brought the clarification requested. Patrick Carpenter, manager of INDOT’s Cultural Resources Office, replied saying INDOT assumes ownership of the bridge, that it has a certificate of approval to demolish the bridge, and has begun coordination with the Army Corps of Engineers concerning Section 106 requirements. He also clarified a process for a non-government entity such as the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge to take ownership.

    He wrote, “INDOT can only transfer ownership of the bridge to a local government authority. If a government authority agreed to accept the bridge, INDOT would provide an amount approximate to the cost of demolition.” The last demolition estimate the Friends have seen was $200,000 but that was a few years ago and costs may have risen.

    The government authority serving as a pass-through agency would transfer the bridge and funds to the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge who would then be the owners and responsible for insuring the bridge, setting aside funds to demolish it (should the worse happen), and budgeting and planning refurbishment and conversion of the bridge into a public park.

    The process of refurbishing Cedar Grove Bridge could begin next spring. The deadline INDOT has set for the Friends to find a pass-through agency is March 1, 2015. Indiana bridge restoration expert Ross Brown said recently he could be ready shortly after that date to begin the work if the Friends become owners.

    Mr. Brown has visited the bridge with the Friends and Professor James Cooper. He has also consulted with J.A. Barker, the engineer who inspected Cedar Grove Bridge in August 2011 and outlined preservation strategies in a report commissioned by the Friends and produced through the offices of Indiana Landmarks. The Friends and Mr. Brown  have agreed in general on the amount of work that can be done to refurbish the Bridge within the Friends initial budget.

    As Mr. Barker reported: “Most of the structure is in acceptable condition. There is much that is enduring and performing well. Most of the steel trusses are in good condition. The floorbeams, though rusted around their upper flange, retain more than enough strength to support pedestrian loading.

    “The south abutment is in good condition. The pier is in fair to good condition, with almost imperceptible lean and a foundation protected by sheet piling driven deep below the riverbed. The north abutment is in fair condition, with a solid centerwall that supports the north truss, but with cracks and movement evident in both wingwalls.”

   Shoring up these weaknesses has been discussed in detail and will be among the first things done, should the Friends take ownership, as will removing any dangling steel.

    Regarding Ross Brown’s ability to do the work as stipulated, he is currently constructing Freedom Bridge, a 300-foot single span over a four-lane highway in Dephi, Indiana. At the same time he is hoping to save an 1871 iron truss bridge in Pennsylvania from demolition. He said they are trying to use barges that he will have to build to float the bridge out. The project may take him all winter, but he will be ready to start on the Cedar Grove Bridge “soon after” March 1st.

    I tell you this so you will know and be assured, the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge are ready to take ownership of the bridge in a responsible and thoughtful way. Given the opportunity, we will create a pretty little bridge park that will be looked on as another Whitewater Valley treasure for generations to come.

 

June Moon Metamora


Issue 156

July 1-7, 2014

 

    As you can imagine, this is Big Bang Week. A quick look at the calendar reveals there will be fireworks all over the Whitewater Valley on both July 4th and 5th. The reason is a bit obscure but has something to do with revolutionary tactics taken over 230 years ago.    

    (Who says we don’t have long memories here in the Valley?)

    We still think the best way to see fireworks is from above and the closest we can get to that (at least in this physical form) is either in Richmond or Aurora. Richmond’s big bang op is at the Gaar Farm pleasantly located above Glen Miller Park where the city’s fireworks is held each year. Throw in the Richmond Community Orchestra and friends, plus the opportunity to wander over Gaar House and the Farm Museum and you’ve got a great deal for $10.

    In downtown Aurora the fireworks can be witnessed at ground level or, starting this year, you can watch from the Veraestau Historic Home above the city of spires. Besides being the home of history, Veraestau is also the residence of Indiana Landmarks and those good folks are opening the house for something called Hillforest’s Best of the Bayou.    

    The idea here is to feed you Cajun and Louisiana cuisine with some fine wine and beer while you mingle in preparation for the fireworks. The cost is $50 to non-Indiana Landmarks members,  $45 otherwise, and the money raised will go towards the costs of maintaining Hillforest mansion.

    For fireworks fanatics this is a great year because of this two-day 4th celebration. Without traveling too far, you should be able to get two fireworks in this year. Again, consult our calendar for the details.

 

Live music

   Because this is 4th of July week, most music is going on at those many fireworks celebrations. The popular group Stagger Lee will be playing from 8 to 10 at the Metamora Volunteer Fireman’s Festival and the Metamora group the Local Legends will be playing along the canal earlier in the day.

    In other words, come to Metamora to hear music on the 4th of July which is actually the 5th of July in Metamora just because it’s Metamora and we do things differently here (or is that ‘hear’?).

    We also noticed the Sherman House has rekindled their open mike night. This happens Wednesday from 6 to 10 pm at the Batesville establishment.

    On Thursday, Oxford Music Festival features Smokestack Lighting from 7 to 9:30 pm, but it looks like Music By the River in Lawrenceburg, another summer Thursday event, is taking a break this week. At least we couldn’t find any mention of it in our usual digital haunts.

 

Wine not crow

    Ridge Winery’s tasting room is featured in the latest issue of Honest-To-Goodness Indiana. The winery is located on SR 56 four miles east of Vevay in Switzerland County. The attraction there is sitting on the back deck sipping either Black Jack or their Country White while you watch the Mighty Ohio flowing below the hills of Kentucky.

    On the front page of the issue it says, “The commercial wine industry in the US began in Switzerland County.” If that’s the truth, shouldn’t we crow about it? I mean, we as Hoosiers. We need more things to brag about and that’s not a little thing. That’s a big thing, or could be.

 

Update: Cedar Grove Bridge

    We’re down to a wing a prayer to save the Cedar Grove Bridge. We need to prove we have community support and that means we, like Uncle Sam in a long white beard, need you! Here’s the plan: Write a check to the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge for $10 with a short note saying in your own words ‘I want to help save Cedar Grove Bridge’ and send it to the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge, PO Box 25, Metamora, In 47030. (This is also the address of the Whitewater Valley Guide, btw.)

    Your check will be deposited in a new business account at FCN Bank. At the same time we are creating a not-for-profit corporation in the State of Indiana, but we are not going to go for Federal non-for-profit status at this time. We will do this later should our efforts succeed.

    We can no longer offer you tax exemption with your donation. The new Board of Directors of Whitewater Canal Trail, Inc. decided in April to sever their relations with the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge. This happened a few days after representatives of both groups met to discuss how they could continue to work together.

    As you can imagine, we were blindsided. WCT, Inc. also decided to send back any monies the Friends had raised and were keeping in a special fund in WCT’s account. Per the Friends admonitions this action has been temporarily averted.

    So we lost our friends and supporters at WCT at the same time we read the news that INDOT has all the Indiana permits it needs and plans to go ahead with demolition early next year, like six to eight months from now.

    Hope is dwindling, but is not expired. The people of Graf Road on the other side of the river from the town of Cedar Grove who are also Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge are hoping to make the bridge a vital part of the Franklin County Emergency Evacuation Plan.

    Support from you en masse would go a long way in swaying the authorities in our direction. The monies raised will be used for bridge related support. Should the project fail, remaining monies would be used to support another bridge building or restoration project.

    At our meeting last Tuesday the Friends decided not to go gentle into that good night. We will rage against the dying of the light and the way we’ll do that raging is, first of all, to make our presence known at the Franklin County Fair (July 14-20) with a table and lots of information about why having a bridge is better than not having a bridge in Cedar Grove.

    We are planning to hold a kids paint-the-bridge contest where the best rendition of the bridge will win a cash prize of $75, second place $50, third place $25.

    The judging will be done by people who attend our second ‘raging’ which is a 100th Birthday Party for the Bridge. We are working on the details as you read this, but expect it to be on a Saturday in September, probably the 13th or the 27th. We’ll let you know as the time approaches.

 

Spotlight: Farmers Markets

    So why spend time on Saturday morning at the farmers market when you can buy vegetables at any number of places? 

    Oxford Farmers Market shoppers like Fauzia say, “The value of the market is that everything is at its highest possible quality! The truth is that there's all sorts of laws dealing with the distribution of food but you cannot legislate morality. Everyone here has their morals right!”


Spice up your summer wardrobe with the fabulously floral, 

visit Lucy Locket’s Pockets at Oxford Farmers Market this Saturday. 

Issue 155 

June 24-30, 2014

 

Bluegrass Festival-Wounded Warrior at the Gateway Park

    The Whitewater Canal Byway Association is partnering with the Wounded Warrior Project this year to create a Red, White and Bluegrass festival at the Gateway Park in Metamora, this Wednesday through Saturday.

    “Not only will we have four great days filled with music, fun, camping and food but we will also honor those who have given so much to defend this great country we live in and a portion of the proceeds will go to support the Wounded Warrior Fund,” says WCBA President Candy Yucak of this fourth Gateway Bluegrass Festival.

    The festival starts on Wednesday at five with a free pot-luck dinner and ends on Saturday with fireworks.  Included in the four days will be workshops, food & vendors, a silent auction and many great regional bands.

 

Vital music acoustic and otherwise

    Did you catch Lisa Biales on PBS’ Woodsongs, Old-Time Radio Hour a few weeks back? MC Michael Johnathon said they were ‘celebrating the blues on this show,’ and the first featured act was Lisa Biales (rimes with Vitalis). She will be making a couple of appearances in the Whitewater Valley in the next couple of weeks so pay attention.

    One thing came pretty clear at the outcome of her first set on the Woodsongs blues show was that she should put out a CD of American Jazz Standards. She was weaned on it. Her mother used to listen to Ella Fitzgerald and Edie Gorme and sang in that venue.

    Her father was a bass player in a Dixieland band and she fronted the band when she was 16. MC MJ asked her to sing the first song she did for her dad. It was ‘All of Me’ and when she was done with her extemporaneous, unrehearsed, a capella version the crowd went from polite applause to loud cheers. The respect that came from them was reflected in the eyes and body language of Michael Johnathon as well.

    The thing is blues is easy to sing, those standards aren’t. They separate the slammers from the shimmerers. You could say Lisa, besides being a Biales, is a shimmerer. Folk singer Johnathon said her voice has “a magnificent elastic snap.”

    If you want to experience just what that magnificent snap might actually sound like in person, over a drink or so, get yourself and your select friends to O’Pub in Oxford this Thursday. We’ve heard from a reliable source that Jay Jesse Johnson will be doing an acoustic set with Lisa Biales at the aforementioned establishment from 8 until 11.

    Then on July 10th, Lisa will be playing Oxford’s Summer Music Festival with her Belle of the Blues Band. We’ll remind you about that when the time comes.

    Jay Jesse Johnson, himself, and with his band have a busy week in front of them. Thursday it’s J3 and Lisa B at O’Pub, Friday and Saturday nights the Jay Jesse Johnson Band will be on the prowl. Friday night they close out the first night of Canoefest in Brookville and on Saturday they will be playing a familiar gig for them, Firehouse BBQ and Blues in Richmond.

 

The best dang bang!

    The deadline for tickets to the best July 4th fireworks seat in the Whitewater Valley is this Friday, June 27th. July 4th at the Gaar Farm features not only a great view of the fireworks from Glen Miller Park but music and the chance to ramble through an elegant old mansion.

    The music will be provided by the Richmond Community Orchestra, the Eaton Area Community Chorus and special guests Donna Geddes and Ryan Wotherspoon. The house, of course, is the Gaar mansion. See the calendar for more details.

 

 Connersville needs a highway to somewhere

    Connersville needs a new lease on life or maybe that’s a lifeline. Lew Johnson, one of the many volunteers who put on the five-day soapbox derby in Connersville last week, believes that lifeline is a four lane highway north all the way to I-70. We at the Whitewater Valley Guide unanimously agree.

    Connersville is a job generator and for us in Franklin and Union Counties it is our job generator. Let’s face it, we are mostly two-lane locked and this is a superhighway world. (‘Two-lane locked in a superhighway world’ is also the name of a new song I’m working on, but that’s beside the point.)

    I-74 touches Franklin County for a short distance in Batesville. There’s a stretch of four-lane suburbia from the freeway north about half a mile, but beyond that I can’t think of another four-lane in the county. Union County doesn’t even have that half a mile, if memory and 12 years of local exploring serves.

    Yet how many Union County and Franklin County Ford & Visteon employees were there? Enough to cause both counties local economies to go into a slump they have yet to recover from when the plant ultimately shut down.

    Of course, the same is true of Fayette/Connersville, but Connersville has lost so much more than simply the Ford plant. Connersville made the most beautiful and luxurious automobiles in the world in the 1930s. That entire industry is gone. One of the reasons must have to do with location, not the beauty of the location for Connersville is in the Whitewater Valley, but location, location, location.

    Consider the first location, locomotion. Connersville has and had that.

    Consider the second, good highways. When in those same 1930s the national highway system was devised Connersville was left off the map, so to speak. Cambridge City has US 40, Brookville has US 52, but Connersville has no US’s only SR’s and that made a big difference because Eisenhower’s superhighway interstate system which we have today was formulated over the most useful of those old US two-lane highways. Route 66 (US 66) was effectively obliterated by Interstate 40 (and the song went out of many hearts).

    Location three is air travel. As Mr. Johnson pointed out, Mettel Field is something to be proud of. I’m pretty sure it can handle a greater capacity of air cargo traffic than it sees in any given month or year. (Maybe an economic development question for Connersville to ponder is, what is the role of a good airport in a post-Post Office world?)

    But whatever the answer, Connersville does seem to have two of the locations, air and rail, and this go-fast four-lane from Connersville to the nearest freeway would go a long way towards curing its weakest link as a location desirable to industry again.

    Instead of thinking only of bringing great roiling industry to their respective counties where there is far less infrastructure, we suggest Franklin and Union County economic development people support Connersville which has the instrastructure, has the capacity, has the will, the need and the history.

    Bring jobs to Connersville and you bring employment to Franklin and Union County citizens as well. In this part of the Whitewater Valley, Connersville is our job generator. With this four-lane fast-way to I-70, jobs will come to Connersville and we’ll all rise with the tidings.


Gary August Schlueter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Caboose playing Strawberry Days last Saturday

Issue 153 

June 10-16, 2014

 

Pre-summer bounty

   We’re getting into the sweetheart part of the can-you-believe-it’s-not-summer schedule, and there’s more great things to do than time to do them. Not only is the Richmond Shakespeare Festival still going strong, this is the weekend of the Hueston Woods Arts and Crafts Fair.

    It rained last year on Hueston Woods and what was good for the trees, was not so good for potential patrons. So this year we suspect there will be a 24-month build up of desire to mingle among the arts and craft crowd in that beautiful park setting.

    Sunman Fireman’s Festival brings Sunman Community Park alive this Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Where would the Whitewater Valley be without firemen and their festivals? Each week it seems one or two dot the calendar like quick blooming flowers only the locals know the real value of.

    The Lawrenceburg Fairgrounds will be used for what they were meant to be used for starting Monday, June 16th. That would be the Dearborn County 4-H & Community Fair. This is the first state fair of the Whitewater Valley state fair season. A quick look up the pike and we see coming Wayne County 4-H Fair, June 21-28; Franklin County 4-H Fair, July 12-19; Union County 4-H Fair, July 19-24; Ripley County 4-H Fair, July 20-26; Butler County Fair, July 20-26; Preble County Fair, July 26-August 2; Fayette County Free Fair, July 27-August 3.

 

Second Friday fearless

    Keeley Moloney reminds us that Oxford Community Arts Center is hosting Second Friday this week from 6 to 9 pm.  “We're really excited about the variety of arts entertainment and history we'll be showing on June 13th,” Keeley wrote.

    Undaunted by superstition or fear (but not necessarily both) a retrospective of the Oxford String Quartet will be featured, along with music my Doug Hamilton’s Wingwalkers starting at eight.

 

Cache a falling Geo

    Geocaching is not as old as Morrisson-Reeves Library—not by a long shot—but it is featured in and around the venerable library this Saturday in a high-tech treasure hunt.    

    Jenie Lahmann invites you to an introduction to the basics of geocaching. All you have to bring is a smart phone and your otherwise unlimited abilities. You will practice what you’ve learned on the library grounds where caches are squirreled cleverly away beyond the reach of even the Dewey Decimal System.

    If you’re feeling frisky Saturday, you might consider Discovering Geocaching at 9:30 am. Then at noon you’d want to be in the Gorge to catch the special performance of the Richmond Community Orchestra. At two pm ‘Romeo and Juliet’ begins in that Globe of the Whitewater Valley, the Starr-Gennett Piano Factory Theatre.

 

Music in Situ Saturday

    We wrote about this last year and are happy to do it again. “For the fourth consecutive summer, historic and interesting architectural sites will resonate across Indiana with choral music during a project called ‘Musica in Situâ’” which the organizers call ‘Music on Location’.

    “The event is designed to open the doors to the community and celebrate some hidden treasures,” the organizers tell us.

     Led by Dr. Andrew Crow, an intergenerational choir from the Muncie area will bring a program of music specifically chosen to highlight the acoustical and visual properties of each concert venue. Those who attend the free family-friendly performance can expect to hear a variety of choral music, learn a bit about the history of the church, and even participate in communal singing. The ‘situ’ in this case is Reid Memorial Presbyterian Church on North A in Richmond. The time is 7 pm Saturday.

    I wonder if something like this wouldn’t work as a balm for those Catholic worshipers in any of the 27 churches and communities in the Batesville Deanery affected by the closings ordered by the Archdiocese of Indianapolis last year?

    I wonder if a choral of voices sung in intergenerational joy could resonate so deep to sooth the sores. It would certainly be worth a try.

 

Music in different Situ

    Last Thursday, Robin Lacy and DeZydeco played the opening of this year’s Oxford Summer Music Festival and this Thursday they are the second act featured at Music on the River in Lawrenceburg.

    Since Robin has laced them together so closely, it’s only right to say these are the kinds of festivals, these weekly free performances in Oxford and Lawrenceburg, that make the summer great. They turn a mere destination into a destination with a reward. They invite you to come to their towns and explore them anew, and, they seem to say, ‘For this we will give you good music.’

 

Heads Up! Batesville

   Batesville’s Music and Arts Festival is next weekend. It’s the 41st version so you know they must be doing something right. Actually, they are doing something better this year. They are rolling out a ton of stuff from the 16th annual Rural Alliance for the Arts Community Art Show, to professional music by the Celtic group Mother Grove, to wanna be professionals playing their best for recognition and reward in WRBI’s The Country Showdown.

    As WRBI general manager Ronald Green observes, “The Showdown is a great place to get discovered in the country music business."

    Even with this one-week-early alert you are still too late to participate in either the Art Show or the Showdown. Entry deadlines for both have passed. But you can participate by seeing and hearing the work of those who beat you to the draw.

    The 41st Batesville Music and Arts Festival is slated for June 18-20.

Issue 152 

June 3-9, 2014

 

Metamora Sunday: Comedy, songs and strawberries

    The street musicians were in Metamora for no particular reason at all last Sunday except maybe as preparation for the 28th annual Strawberry Days this Sunday. There will be live music throughout the day and strawberry deserts on the lawn of the Banes House.    

    The Banes is on Main, so if you’re poetic you’ll be able to find it easy, just don’t go looking for it in the rains of Spain.

    Besides music and strawberries, the Cat & the Fiddle will be rounding out a Metamora Sunday with comedy. Dwight Simmons will be featured along with Stephen Vincent Giles and Rick Garrett in two shows, one at 4 pm and one at six. It’s a small room and reservations are your only guarantee of a seat. As usual, see the Calendar listing for more details.

 

Two dance at Civic Hall

    In the next two weeks folks in Richmond can do a little comparing of their favorite local dancers and dance companies. The Next Step Dance is having two recitals this Friday, a matinee, so to speak, from 5 to 6 pm and another performance at 7:30.

    Dance Techniques Recital is next Friday, which also happens to be the 13th, at 7 pm with a Saturday matinee at 2 pm. With actors before a show you wish them, “Break a leg!” With dancers on Friday the 13th, not so much.

    Both dance recitals will be performed on the big stage at Richmond’s Civic Hall Performing Arts Center, thus living up to its full name.

 Much ado about Shakespeare

    Ka-thump! The second shoe falls. The first shoe was April 23 when Shakespeare’s birthday party was held in the Starr-Gennett Building in Whitewater Gorge Park.

    Or was it the weekend of April 4th and 5th when ‘Hamlet’ and ‘Spamalot’ and ‘Rosencranz and Guilderstern Are Dead’ were performed sometimes simultaneously causing near collisions among theatre lovers in Richmond running between Murray Theatre and Goddard Auditorium. The fanatic Shakespeare lover probably could have attended all of the performances on one weekend, but not easily.

    Anyway, here’s the next star in that bracelet:

    Indiana’s Richmond Shakespeare Festival is producing in repertory ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ and ‘Romeo and Juliet’ in Richmond’s Starr-Gennett piano factory.    

    Celebrate the Bard’s birthday in April and his works in June, good plan. June is a time for festivals and for this weekend I would suspect Whitewater Valley Gorge Park will more resemble Camelot than Indiana.

    “Professionally directed, designed, and managed, these performances are intended to be fresh, accessible, and relevant,” so sayeth the producers, who bow generously to Richmond Parks and Rec Department for their support.

    The Starr-Gennett building becomes a 250-seat theatre and from June 6th through the 15th the surrounding park is converted into a festival area with performers, art displays, vendors and other events and activities. Come and be one of the other events. Come in costume and be an activity. The festival is free and theatre admission depends on where you sit (and how you act).

 

Wildlife viewing without moving (much)

    If you want to while away some time getting to know some of the wild creatures of the Whitewater Valley and you want to remain where you are (presumably in front of your computer), we suggest you do a Google search for ‘Paul Baudendistel flickr.’

    There you will find the most amazing night videos of local creatures like fox, squirrel, deer, coyote and even mink. The mink is still a bit of a mystery but is an educated guess based on the way the tail moves. You’ll also see color still shots of the eagles nesting near Brookville Beach on Levee Road and a Great Blue Heron trout fishing, catching and swallowing.

    The site is worth seeing and it is worth studying. It justifies in detail why the Gateway Park was named a Certified Wildlife Habitat.

 

Of roses and blooming balloons

    What we hope will be the first of many Bloom and Glows happens this Wednesday at the Richmond Rose Garden in Glen Miller Park on East Main. Bloom and Glow will be raising money for Richmond Rose Garden by raising hot air balloons.

   Not only is there the colorful ceremony of filling those big balloons—the high-output burners flaming liquid propane into a hot gas that slowly brings the balloon to life exposing its unique artwork and gentle temperament—it will happen as the sunlight dwindles thus providing the glow.

    While you’re in Glen Miller Park, imagine the other Glen Miller, the bandleader, leading his orchestra through a slightly revised version of ‘Moon Glow’ —

 

It must have been moon glow

Way up in the blue

Or could it be Bloom and Glow

That led me straight to you

 

Muzzleloaders and Music

    Did you know there’s a Southeastern Indiana Musicians Hall of Fame? There is and it’s at 331 Walnut Street in Lawrenceburg. But what does that have to do with muzzleloaders? you might legitimately ask.

    A musician being nominated for SIM Hall of Fameliness is John Race. His nomination says when he was five 1948 he went with his family to hear music in Friendship either at the “firehouse or Muzzleloaders building.” So there’s the bridge between the two and the next question is: How long has Friendship been Friendship, the same one we know right today with muzzleloaders and music?

    If you really need to know, next week (June 14-22) starting at 9 am, 500 vendors will swarm into Friendship to create a googoo gala of “selling a wide variety of new, used, antiques and collectibles. Trolley rides, country music and lots of specialty foods.” One of them has the answer and it’s your job to find it. Let us know how that works, btw.

    During those same dates the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association’s Spring National Shoot is featured in the tiny town that lives to grow grotesquely large on special weeks like this one coming up. There will be pre-1840s encampments along with period crafts and youth activities.

 

Spotlight: Farmers Markets

    From her website: “To those who might be new to us, Mary's Plant Farm is not a garden center, it is a small farm, where the plants are field grown. Our perennial plant list is extensive including many shade and native varieties. Also many varieties of flowering shrubs and understory trees, plus unusual and hard to find flowering shade trees.

    “For over 60 years, I have been growing the ordinary and unusual in plants. Some of which were handed down from my parents’ garden and are not readily available. If you do not see it listed or are having difficulty finding a specific variety, let us know. It might be available but not in enough quantity to list.”

    If you go to www.marysplantfarm.com and click on Newsletters 2013 Fall you’ll find some very useful information on planting plants that like the shade.

—Next Monday, the Spring Edition of Eating Seasonally will take place at Michaela Farm in Oldenburg. Come learn how to prepare garden fresh recipes with spring vegetables and sample dishes with unique flavors. Learn how to better utilize Indiana’s harvest as each season offers distinctive tastes. We will tour Michaela Farm’s gardens, and learn a few gardening tips. Possible recipes include: Radish, Kohlrabi, Pak Choy, and Swiss Chard.

—West College Corner Farmers Market opens this Saturday from 9 am to noon. The market is at 403 Liberty Avenue in West College Corner, Indiana.



Gary August Schlueter


 

 

 

 

 

 



-----

Farmers Markets in the Whitewater Valley

2014



Tuesdays

 

Richmond Farmers Market

3-6 pm

7th Street across from M-R Library

Richmond, In

 

Thursdays

 

Lawrenceburg Farmers Market

Thursdays 4-7 pm

29 E. High Street

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Fridays

 

Brookville Farmers Market

3:30-7 pm through October

First and Main Street

Brookville, In

brookvillefamersmarket@yahoo.omc

 

Bright Farmers Market

Fridays, 3-6 pm

Providence Presbyterian parking lot

23983 Salt Fork Road

Bright, In

812 637-3898

 

Union County Farmers Market

Friday's 4pm to 8pm

26 West Union Street

(on the Courthouse Lawn)

Liberty, Indiana

765-458-5976

Last Market October 3rd

 

Saturdays

 

Oxford Farmers Market Uptown

8 am-Noon

Uptown Parks

Oxford, Oh

513 505-5238


West College Corner Farmers market

Free, 9 am-Noon

Saturdays

403 Liberty Avenue

West College Corner, In

765 732-3482

Until September 27th


Fayette County Farmers Market

7 am-Noon

Old Kmart parking lot

N. Park Avenue-SR 1

Connersville, In

765 827-1366

 

Batesville Farmers Market

8-11 am

Village Square

Batesville, In

812 663-9546

 

Lawrenceburg Farmers Market

Saturdays 9 am–1 pm

29 E. High Street

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Richmond Farmers Market

7 am- Noon

7th Street across from M-R Library

Richmond, In

 


 

Spotlight: Farmers Markets is sponsored by Oxford Farmers Market. Oxford Farmers Market is open from 8 am until noon every Saturday. Find it in Uptown Oxford behind Memorial Park. Visit their website at Oxford Farmers Market.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 Spring 2012

 

Kinda wish it was Spring

the real thing

not this 62 degrees

blue as it can be day

with sunshine and bird song

and barren trees

but flower blooming Spring

power looming bringer

of auspiciously related all-growth

like suspiciously related all-man

tapped into some fecund harmony

where we all come up together.

Yeah, I wish.

 


Gary August Schlueter


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taking in the view
Whistle Pig Willy sits on a brick 
Gary Schlueter picture

 

Issue 149

May 13-19, 2014


To Create and Connect

    Matt McKimmy reminds us Friday is Bike to Work Day in Richmond. A group of volunteers known as Bike Richmond is the instigator of this healthy reminder of how we can do something positive for ourselves and our environment all in one fell swoop, so to speak. Though, come to think of it, bicycling is a many peddled thing.

    And of course, bicycling to work or anywhere else is a fine thing to do anytime the weather’s right. Also Bike to Work serves as a bugle call to those of us who have yet to pump up the tires on our otherwise garaged bike. Let’s get peddlin’!

    To that end, we need A Cyclist’s View. The name comes from a feature we saw in the digital version of the Caribbean Journal which used it as the name of an opinion column, sort of the thoughts of the writer as he rode his bike. But I’m thinking A Cyclist’s View could become a regular part of the Whitewater Valley Guide.

    It could be a section on bicycling in the Valley. Its goal would be to create regionally designated bike trails throughout the Valley and connect them to the transnational trails already in place.

    Anyone interested in digitally discussing this, email me directly garyaschlueter@gmail.com. Subject: To Create and Connect: ‘A Cyclist’s View’

 

Making waves of nightlife

    Metamora is having one of its up weekends. Up weekends are when entertainment and nightlife come to the old canal town. Dayton singer/songwriter Kevin Milner is featured at the Metamora Music Café, a new venue happily enscounced in the Methodist Church basement on Wynn Street.

    Then on Saturday, Divinity Rose from Louisville headlines an all female comedy show at The Cat and the Fiddle. CoLee Davis and Janette Perez of Indianapolis are also on the bill. All this high powered female funny business is being packed into two shows one at 6:30, one at 8:30 and twelve bucks includes your Catrina Campbell-cooked dinner.

 

Show & Tell, Swap & Sell

    Show & Tell at the Model T Museum on North Street in Richmond might be an interesting way to spend part of Saturday. It’s an all day event and this is their second annual show otherwise we wouldn’t mention it.

    Here’s their note to those in the know: “Remember the excitement we shared at the Centennial. We are rekindling the spirit and fun we had in Richmond during that week with a one day Homecoming.”

    This second year the event has grown to include a Model T Swap & Sell. This is one way the casually interested public can get slightly more involved and that’s called progress.

 

OPPORTUNITY

    We were told 1,500 cars loaded with well-heeled younger folks parked elsewhere and were bussed, one school bus every 15 minutes, to Haspin Acres for the Spartan event a few weeks back. The ‘elsewhere’ parking was in Metamora and the people who came spent money all over the county, lots of it, on B&B’s, restaurants, gas and things.

    This is a significant growth from last year’s Spartan race which stayed pretty much within the confines of Laurel, but was still an enormous success. The group which put it on, a national organization which apparently runs these things like clockwork, has already reserved this Metamora parking site for next year and that spells OPPORTUNITY.

    As the Everly Brothers never sang, “Wake up Little Suzie. Spartacus is a’comin’.”

 

Prehistoric information

    It’s too bad Andrew Sawyer’s program is only an hour long. His subject dates back 12,000 years and then only terminates “with the arrival of the first European explorers in the late 1600s.” Mr. Sawyer is the site manager and anthropoligist at SunWatch Indian Village and Archaeological Park in Dayton. His subject on Saturday for the public and the loyal members of the Morgan Township Historical Society is ‘The Archaeology of Ohio.’

    And if Ohio had human culture dating back 12,000 years or so, you can bet it was the same thing here in the Whitewater Valley because Ohio wasn’t Ohio then and Indiana certainly wasn’t Indiana. Rivers would have played a far more important part in an area’s definition than the name of a political border.

    To help complete your education about ancient Valley residents, Jack Blosser from Fort Ancient Museum and Memorial presents the History of Fort Ancient on Thursday at 7:30 for the Crosby Township Historical Society at the community center on Willey Road. The public is invited to come and learn.

 

New ethic, new symbol

    While writing a story about Governor Mike Pence creating the Bicentennial Legacy Conservation Area in Wayne, Union and Franklin counties, we finally noticed the Indiana state seal which needs revamping as soon as possible.

    In case, like me, you’ve looked at it for years yet haven’t really seen it, here’s the basic concept, chop down trees and chase away wildlife. There actually is a guy chopping down a virgin tree while a buffalo, its head down, runs scared for parts unknown, aka, Illinois (which we all know is positively unknowable).

    As Indiana DNR Director Cameron Clark said, this effort, the creation of a $30 million pool of money applied directly towards creating land conservation areas, is “truly transforming the conservation ethic in Indiana.” We need a state symbol that reflects that ethic.

    The present Indiana State logo lacks imagination, is not timely and is counterproductive to the governor’s best efforts. We at the Whitewater Valley Guide say, ‘Scrap that sucker!’

 

Spotlight: Farmers Markets

 

    Both Brookville Farmers Market and Bright Farmers Market open this Friday, May 16th.  Brookville starts at 3:30 and is open until 7 pm. As of last season, it is finally located where it always should have been, on 1st and Main.

    Open from 3-6 pm, Bright Farmers Market is located in the Providence Presbyterian Church parking lot on Salt Creek Road. From the pictures, this is a picturesque site and handy to town shopping as well.

    We also received a report from the manager of the Richmond Winter Farmers Market this week. Matt McKimmy wrote, “I appreciate your promoting the Richmond Winter Farmers Market this season! We had an excellent turn out all winter long, even in the midst of some pretty snowy Saturdays. The Winter Market will resume on November 8th, so mark your calendar now! :-)”

    Richmond’s Summer Farmers Market has been on-going since May 3rd. It’s located in the parking lot on 7th Street across from Morrisson-Reeves Library. 


Tuesdays


Richmond Farmers Market

3-6 pm

7th Street across from M-R Library

Richmond, In


Thursdays


Lawrenceburg Farmers Market 

Thursdays 4-7 pm

29 E. High Street

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507


Fridays


Brookville Farmers Market

3:30-7 pm through October

First and Main Street

Brookville, In

brookvillefamersmarket@yahoo.omc

 

Bright Farmers Market

Fridays, 3-6 pm

Providence Presbyterian parking lot

23983 Salt Fork Road

Bright, In

812 637-3898


Saturdays


Oxford Farmers Market Uptown

8 am-Noon

Uptown Parks

Oxford, Oh

513 505-5238

 

Fayette County Farmers Market

7 am-Noon

Old Kmart parking lot

N. Park Avenue-SR 1

Connersville, In

765 827-1366

 

Batesville Farmers Market

8-11 am

Village Square

Batesville, In

812 663-9546


Lawrenceburg Farmers Market 

Saturdays 9 am–1 pm

29 E. High Street

Lawrenceburg, In

812 537-4507

 

Richmond Farmers Market

7 am- Noon

7th Street across from M-R Library

Richmond, In

 

 

 

Spotlight: Farmers Markets is sponsored by Oxford Farmers Market. Oxford Farmers Market is open from 8 am until noon every Saturday. Find it in Uptown Oxford behind Memorial Park. Visit their website at Oxford Farmers Market.

 

Goat love and dependence

Artistry Farms


Issue 148

May 6-12, 2014


Lend Me a Tenor

    Richmond Community Theatre is closing out its season, make that, “incredible” season with hilarity in the form of Broadway and London sensation ‘Lend Me a Tenor.’

    This “madcap, screwball comedy” starts off with a joke in its title. Lend me a tenner being the other meaning that makes the first humorous, at least for those who have a propensity for that sort of thing. Humor, that is, not lending ten dollar bills.

    Imagine it’s September 1934. Saunders, the general manager of the Cleveland Grand Opera Company, is primed to welcome world famous, Tito Morelli, the greatest tenor of his generation, who is to appear for one night only as Othello.

    The star arrives late and, through a hilarious series of mishaps, is believed to be dead. A frantic attempt to salvage the evening produces two Othellos running around in costume and two women running around in lingerie.

    ‘Lend Me a Tenor’ directed by Ken Ludwig will run for two weekends.

 

Short deadline for art

    A call for art is coming out of Preble County. Artists have Thursday and Friday between 1 and 7 pm to drop off up to five entries at the Preble County Art Center on Schwartzel Road. It’s a juried show so there’s no guarantee yours will be hung, but if it is and it sells, there is a 30 percent house commission. Entry forms can be downloaded from their website or call 937 456-3999.

 

National Train Day: Book sales and Lincoln log-in

    The Whitewater Valley is one of the few places in Indiana that actually celebrates National Train Day. Each year more elements are added to the Connersville to Metamora celebration. That should give you a clue that we’re talking about the Whitewater Valley Railroad. And this year one of the added elements is a book about our familiar excursion train.

    The authors of the book Whitewater Valley Railroad, Francis Parker and Judy Clem, will be sitting at a wide desk behind piles of new books in Connersville’s Grand Central Station hopefully signing away from 10 am until Noon when they along with all these new book owners will climb aboard the Valley Flyer and fly down the valley in the presence of Dean Dorrell as Mr. Abraham Lincoln.

    National Train Day falls on the Saturday before Mothers Day. This year it is May 10th, a day made famous in 1869 when the ‘Golden Spike’ was driven into the final rail at Promotontory Summit, Utah, thus creating the transcontinental railroad. What was good for commerce and nation building was not so good for the original human beings and the buffalo.

    We expect The Train Place in Metamora to be ready to receive visitors by National Train Day. The new sign is up at the new location and the interior is slowly taking shape.   Regarding The Train Place’s new sign, it is probably level, but the building it is on is probably not. Maybe levelness like beauty is in the eye of the beholder, though I doubt an engineer would agree.

 

SPUR saves natural places

    Oftentimes, when it’s successful, the work of local heroes gets folded into our life-scape and becomes invisible. We are better for their work but, more often than not, don’t even know they did it. Such is probably the case with SPUR, the Society for Preservation and Use of Resources and the natural beautification of Richmond.

    Founded in 1966, way before the word (and concept) environmentalism became part of our collective responsibility (and guilt), SPUR was created in response to the City of Richmond Master Plan of the day which did not include much interest in preserving natural areas.

    In the early days SPUR concentrated on the Whitewater River Gorge in Richmond. The result of that is the Whitewater Gorge Park and Trail System which preserves the beauty of the Gorge for today and future generations.

    SPUR has a long, proud history including hosting the Trail Summit two years ago which brought together regional trail volunteers and professionals who in some cases did not even know their counterparts existed until the Trail Summit.

    Naturally, being pro-active our-very-own-self, we expect you might want to become SPURred on so here’s how you can get involved with this worthy group.

    On Tuesday, May 20th SPUR will be holding its annual meeting in the Richmond Municipal Building’s Community Room. A potluck dinner starts at 6 pm with board business to follow. But the star of the evening is Trudy E. Bell, an author, scientist and cyclist, who will be speaking on “Extreme Weather and Today’s Engineered Infrastructure: Lessons from the Great Easter 1913 Flood.”

    Because of limited space, we are asked to RSVP by Monday, May 19th to scottzimmerman429@gmail.com or 765 935-5096.

 

Local music scene

    We like it weird, sometimes. So here’s one for that bag. Amelia Robinson writes in the Dayton Daily News that three groups are threatening each other over who has the right to create a funk museum in Dayton. Apparently, Dayton has been dubbed the “Land of Funk” because of groups like the Ohio Players who contributed to the funk sound in the 70s and 80s.

    “The founders of the Dayton Funk Dynasty Group, The Dayton Land of Funk Museum and Hall of Fame, and the Funk Hall of Fame Museum — all registered with the state — have threatened each other or been threatened with lawsuits since late 2012,” Ms Robinson wrote.

    And poor Wright State, which has been gathering funkadelia (like forever), wants to work with whomsoever comes out on top. So it looks like Dayton is going to get a museum of funk music, but who plays the lead is still in the tuning-up stage.

 

Spotlight: Farmers Markets

    This is the tenth year for Oxford Farmers Market Uptown and Market Manager Larry Slocum believes the reason for its continued success is “the fact our Market Council continues to live by our original Mission: To provide fresh and local farm items, strengthen the relationship between farmers and consumers, and support small farms by providing an outlet for farm products.”

    The theme for this year’s market is: “Your economy starts with food…know your farmer.”


— Michaela Farm is hosting a volunteer work day on Saturday, May 17. “You'd find these luscious grounds filled with the buzz of activity as we harvest asparagus and spinach (in our farm store), put out even more transplants for your garden (for sale right outside of the barn) and keep on our planting frenzy,” head gardener Rebekah Miller wrote recently.

    The Oldenburg offshoot of the Sisters of St. Francis is truly a growing enterprise, pun definitely intended. They’ve added seasonal gardener Beth Carlson to the grounds.

It is also a place for your seasonal gardening. Presently they have summer transplants of tomato, zucchini, yellow squash, cucumbers, okra, herbs and 12 different types of flowers available for purchase.

    Michaela Farm also sells fresh food and they do it all year long. Having to travel to Oldenburg to enjoy this founding establishment is an added treat.

 

  — Flashback from the Whitewater Valley Guide July 30, 2013: Eating foods fresh from the ground, bush or tree is good for you. It’s a simple fact. Every summer when the salad days come we are healthier than any other time of the year and the reason is enzymes.

   In organic or healthy-grown raw food the enzymes have not been compromised. Cook ‘em and you lose ‘em. And enzymes are catalysts for chemical reactions in our cells. So if you really want to catalyze your cell reactions, you need fresh picked, raw food.

   Ergo Farmers Markets.


— Here’s a list of Farmers Markets open this early 2014.

 

Fridays

Brookville Farmers Market

3:30-7 pm through October

First and Main Street

Brookville, In

brookvillefamersmarket@yahoo.omc

 

Saturdays

Oxford Farmers Market Uptown

8 am-Noon

Uptown Parks

Oxford, Oh

513 505-5238

 

Fayette County Farmers Market

7 am-Noon

Old Kmart parking lot

N. Park Avenue-SR 1

Connersville, In

765 827-1366

 

Batesville Farmers Market

8-11 am

Village Square

Batesville, In

812 663-9546

 

Spotlight: Farmers Markets is sponsored by Oxford Farmers Market. Oxford Farmers Market is open from 8 am until noon every Saturday. Find it in Uptown Oxford behind Memorial Park. Visit their website at Oxford Farmers Market.

 --------------

For those of you so inclined, 

Death might be a masterpiece.

 

Death might be a masterpiece

Done right

You can’t pull it or tug it

You gotta be ready

With your eyes open

But it can’t be hard

It should be smooth as a decision

I could to this or that but not both

or the many permeations between

fanning out from there

where thisness or not exists.

 


 

Dana Lentini, Born to Sing, voice recital Sunday

April 29, 2014


Give a little, sell a little

    We’ve spotted another little trendlet, if that’s not redundant. A couple of weeks ago the Guide’s calendar was overrun with people using wine in creative and resourceful ways with art and otherwise, now see the emergence of Customer Appreciation days that deserve to be capitalized for their scope, length and the generous amount of freebies.    

    Warm Glow is putting up a Customer Appreciation Tent for ten hours of sensory appreciation this Saturday including wine sippings and gourmet food samplings, and, sing it with me, ‘One quarter off on the ca-a-an-dles.’

    Warm Glow is in Centerville on North Centerville Road not far from Olive Hill where the Craft Show is being held at the same time as all the Warm Glowing. So it would be possible to carry the warm glow from one to the other, or adversely to carry the olive branch walking the mile between them, and hopefully, beyond.

    Customers of George’s Pharmacy are in for a “customer appreciation extravaganza” this June 20th in Brookville. George Gillman, the George of George’s, was granted permission by the town council to block off 5th Street between Main and Progress Street in front of the movie theater which will continue to be closed for renovations at the time.

    The Council was told chicken dinners and beer will be served for free along with live music and other festivities.

 

The Chocolate Garden of Earthly delights

    With no Yellow Brick Road in sight we suggest you follow the Chocolate Trail through the Richmond Rose garden Saturday from 1 to 3 pm and enjoy a performance by the Richmond Symphony Brass at 2. Local chocolatiers will gather in one place, offering free samples of numerous items, including Killer Brownies, cake pops, and chocolate wine.

    This is yet another collaboration and another free wining and dining, this time with a sharp culinary edge, chocolate. I mean wouldn’t you? Walk the Chocolate Trail, if you dare, this Saturday afternoon in the seasonally blooming Glen Miller Park on East Main.

Pray for fine weather and rain on Mondays.

 

History old and new

    As far as we know there is no such thing as Prehistoric Preservation Month, but if there was, this week would be a good time to begin. There’s more than one way to get hands on with prehistory this week. First there’s the Richmond Fossil Fest, a collaboration between Richmond Parks & Recreation, the Wayne County Tourism Bureau and Earlham College’s Joseph Moore Museum.

    Begin at 10 am Saturday in Richmond’s Springwood Park where we are promised activities for all ages, including guided fossil hunts, fossil identification and a fossil ride on the Cardinal Greenway. Along with your helmut bring your stone-age bike, ala Barry Rubble. (FYI, a stone-age bike would be like a 10-speed.)

    On Sunday in New Trenton, Indiana, the Whitewater Valley Archaeological Society is holding its annual Indian Artifact Show. This year’s theme is Mississippian triangle arrowheads. The Society is made up of amateur artifact hunters and some of the collections are truly eye-opening. Some of the best artifacts in the Mid-West will be on display and if you have any questions about your own collection, this is the place to find the answers.

    If history with buildings, sidewalks, and no small amount of antique urban design is more to your liking, Oxford Park Pavilion is the place to be come Saturday morning. Beginning the first Saturday in May and continuing at the same time for the next four Saturdays of May you may celebrate Historic Preservation Month by taking a guided tour of Oxford.

    The theme this walk is Fraternity History and Museums. It begins like the others at 10:30 am. This is yet another collaboration, this time between Smith History Library, McGuffey Museum and Oxford’s Historic & Architectural Preservation Commission who remind us most walks include an interior tour, so bring your inside voice.

 

Batesville new festival: Sawdust Days

    Batesville Library’s After Hours Concert Series 2014 is going to be the fireworks in a new spring festival called ‘Sawdust Days.’ Ah choo! Village Square, probably along George Street, will be the site of the Sawdust Days Festival on Friday from 11 am to 5. But the fireworks we mentioned will be provided at seven by Planet D Nonet, a hot 9-piece jazz, blues and swing group from Detroit.

    They played Library After Hours last year and blew the audience away. If confined again to the small performance room at the library the entire building would probably be in jeopardy, at least the ceiling. These guys are that hot, ergo a movement of venue. There will be plenty of room in the open air by George for them to blast off, and the crowd can be as big as it wants to be.

    An hour before Planet D performs, Ertel Cellars Winery will be offering a wine tasting with the ability to purchase by the glass if you’ve passed the minimum of 21 years and have enough cash.

    Why ‘Sawdust Days’ you might ask. It is a celebration of Batesville’s history and heritage of woodcraftsmanship. And to see how that translates in today’s language, woodcrafting vendors will be both demonstrating their craft and selling the results. Sort of a Show ‘n’ Sell.

    Sawdust Days will culminate on Sunday at 1 pm with a free vintage baseball game at Liberty Park if the weather allows. After all where would the baseball bat be without sawdust falling off it at some time.

 

Our friend Wormwood

    This Sunday at 11 am near Eaton, Ohio the Herb Faire begins. It is hosted by the Herb Society of the Preble County Historical Society, sort of a society within a society. It will be held on the Swartsel Road grounds of PCHS. Artemisia is the 2014 featured herb.    

    The Society within writes, “Cooks and gardeners alike will be interested in trying new unique flavors and aromas to add a little spice and adventure to recipes and flower beds.” Sweet Bay Laurel, Betony and Wormwood will be available for those who want to think outside the kitchen herb box.

    Lots to learn, lots to see, lots to sniff and you get to take home herb plants ready to drop in the ground. “Visitors can sample a variety of tasty herb dips and teas.” Buckeye Jacks will be catering for a Sunday afternoon on the grounds.

 

The Foodies that bloom in the Spring, tra la

    The Big Four Café is not usually open in the evenings but it will be today, Tuesday, April 29th. The program tonight at the Big Four will be Help Rebuild Your Local Food System, Meeting for Consumers. That’s a mouthful and consequently, something to chew on.

    Consumers who are looking for “healthy, nutritious, locally grown food” are encouraged by Purdue Extension Service to attend. The goal is to improve the process of how that food gets from the farms of those willing growers to the palate of those equally willing consumers. It’s an experiment, so to speak, and you could be one of the well-fed Guinea pigs (in a nice way). Purdue Extension is hosting this year-long pilot program.

 

Editorial: One pig squeaks

   The present farmers market system is great, but it’s still in its pioneer stage. Farmers Markets in the Whitewater Valley are pretty much outposts serving a community who can conveniently drive to it. There needs to be more linkage between farmers markets in Aurora, Batesville, Brookville, Liberty, Oxford, Richmond and so on. Wherever there is a farmers market in the Valley it should be linked to the others.

    Eighty miles from top to bottom is Whitewater Valley local. (By the way, local has to be one of those words that moves with the protagonist, in each case the roving I.) 

    It seems to me if we want to improve the process of how locally grown food gets from farm to palate, we need to create such a linkage. Not just for the sake of saying they are linked, but to share information weekly about mutual concerns and obstacles to fulfilling the stated goal of such a linkage, i.e., improving the process from field to plate.

 

Farmers Markets opening

    In the Whitewater Valley we are lucky to have at least two farmers markets open all year long, the Winter Farmers Markets on 19th Street in Richmond and Uptown Oxford.

   Oxford Farmers Market Uptown had planned a more active schedule over this past winter but the severity of it nipped that one in the bud. Oxford did keep to its winter traditional third Saturday market, we are told.

    Oxford Farmers Market Uptown celebrates 10 years of successful operations this increasingly optimistic 2014. It is Uptown because there was another farmers market in Oxford. It was called the Talawanda Farmers Market but it only accepted producers who lived in the Talawanda School District, according to The Miami Student, the oldest university newspaper in the United States, according to the Miami Student. When this rule changed Talawanda farmers merged with Uptown Oxford or, more formally, Oxford Farmers Market Uptown. From the merger Uptown Market gained four produce vendors, three farmers, one baker and four local honey vendors, the Student reported.

    The Uptown Farmers Market is digitally wired to friendsofmarket@oxfordfarmersmarket.com

and on the web at www.oxfordfarmersmarket.com.

    Market Manager Larry Slocum sends out a timely and helpful Market Minute every Friday to those who ask nicely. In the ‘Fresh From the Farm’ section he lists the vegetables, fruit, meat and other farm products available the next day at the market.

    In the last one we received he showed a way to cut through the confusion of what ‘organic’ is by “simply walking up to your friendly farmer at our market. We will be starting our 10th season on May 3rd in Uptown Oxford!!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

Steamboat Greene

    In its heyday the Greene Line once owned 26 boats which plied the Ohio, Mississippi, Cumberland and other American rivers. When Pam Beneker of the Franklin County Historical Society learned that Tom Greene and his family made their home in Cedar Grove, just south of Brookville, she asked him to make a presentation about his life aboard the Delta Queen.

    The big fireplace dining room in the Hearthstone was filled with people which surprised Tom’s wife Shirley. Over the winter Tom had some health problems and Shirley was at the lectern helping him with the presentation.

    The Delta Queen was built in Scotland in 1926, Tom said. She was then shipped to Stockton, California where she and a sister ship, the Delta King (yes, here is an example where a king and a queen are both ‘she’) carried passengers and cargo along the Sacramento River.

    In 1948 the Delta Queen was purchased for $46,000 by Tom’s father, Captain Tom Greene. It was then shipped to Pittsburgh via the Panama Canal where it took another million dollars to fit her out. She was home-ported in Cincinnati until the town fathers decided to dedicate the waterfront to major league sports stadia. To this day Shirley still bemoans that decision. The company was sold in 1973.

    The Delta Queen now resides at a permanent dock in Chattanooga, Tennessee where it serves as a floating hotel.

    Still residing near water, the Greene family live near Big Cedar Creek. Tom keeps an art studio where he paints and does freelance art work, he said.

 

Voices of Spring

    This seems to be arising a particularly singing Spring. Judging by this week’s Guide calendar we’ve got five opportunities to hear the human voice at its best, that is when joined together in a joyous noise. And just to prove that it’s not all too ethereal, there’s even one choral competition, the ISSMA Choral Competition at Civic Hall in Richmond this Friday.

    Also on Friday starting at precisely the same time, 7:30, one at Goddard Auditorium of Earlham College, the other at Kumler Chapel on Miami’s Oxford campus, the Spring Choral Concert and the MU Collegiate Chorale alight.

    The MU Chorale performs again on Saturday while on Sunday at St. Mary’s Church the free Spring Concert Choir begins at seven.

    Other things of spring this week include a ballet to Beatrix Potter’s creations in Brookville, Beauty and the Beast in Harrison, and a carriage parade up High Street, a red brick Oxford lane.

 

Happy birthday Willie!

    We have been and will be witnessing a renaissance of things Shakespearean in the upper Whitewater Valley for one good reason, 2014 makes the Bard’s 450th birthday! which deserves the exclamation mark Jenie attached to it when she sent out the flyer for the William Shakespeare Film Festival. It begins at 6 pm on May 6 at Morrison-Reeves Library in Richmond and is a five-part program carrying on through May 22.  

    Because of contractual complications they can’t tell the names of the films but don’t be surprised if there are two ‘Romeo & Juliet’s’ to every one ‘Shakespeare in Love’. 

    The Bard birthday celebration this Wednesday is at the Starr-Gennett Building in Richmond's Whitewater Gorge Park at noon. Springing from the Bard’s birthday cake will be representatives of Richmond Shakespeare Festival which is being cast for a really big event in June.

    Representatives from RSF's production and festival teams will be on hand to share news about what the Festival has in store for its inaugural season. If you become inspired to take a more active role, the production and festival teams will gladly find a place for you and your specific talents.

 

New production, new venue needs actors

    The Metamora Performing Arts Association is holding auditions for the melodrama, Granny Smythe Goes to Washington or...She Was the Apple of His Pie by Sue Rae.

    Auditions will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at the fellowship hall of the Metamora United Methodist Church located on Wynn Street in Metamora.  The dates for production are August 22, 23 and 24th at the stage on Lovers Lane in Metamora.

    There are parts for seven women and five men and one child (may be male or female).  The play takes place in 1885, during a boom time in North Bend, Washington Territory, in and around the d'Pye Pie Shop. 

    Joanne Williams will be directing the show and she promises lots of fun and pie for both the actors and the audience.  If you have questions, contact her at 765-309-3709 or at joannewilliams1957@hotmail.com.

 

Arcadia book on Whitewater Valley Railroad

    The Whitewater Valley can certainly be proud that we have an excursion train to hop on anytime the mood to ride the rails strikes us, but I wonder how many of us who live here have actually ridden the Whitewater Valley Railroad.

    Any oversight on your part can’t be caused by not having enough opportunities. Starting next week the new Connersville to Metamora season opens and trains are regularly scheduled Fridays through Sundays.

    This is an especially exciting time for the railroad with the recent publication of an Arcadia Publishing book exclusively about them. It is in the Images of Rail series entitled, cleverly enough, Whitewater Valley Railroad.

     It was written by local authors Francis Parker and Judy Clem and “takes readers on a ride through history” with more than 200 historic images donated from members and volunteers. It focuses primarily on the efforts of dedicated volunteers who for 40 years have worked to preserve, maintain, and operate this historic railroad.

    All profits from the sale of the book are being donated back to the Whitewater Valley Railroad where authors Francis H. Parker and Judy Clem are qualified locomotive engineers and conductors. Both authors hope that this book will encourage other tourist railroads or operational railroad museums to publish their histories so that all of their hard work will not be lost or forgotten.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pilates and palates

    Sometimes you have to blink twice before you can begin to believe your eyes. Read this quick: ‘Asanas & Ales.’ Don’t seem to go together, do they? But they will Saturday in Richmond.

    Asanas are the various postures of Hatha Yoga. The seat you use when you meditate, butt on a hard cushion, backbone straight, legs crossed in front of you and folded one over the other at the knee, is an asana. Asanas are designed to lead to unity, make that Unity which is another word for Yoga.

    Ales probably don’t need as much explanation. Beer is omnipresent and far, far older than Yoga, the study of utilizing asanas and/or meditation to reach Unity. Ales and beer have long been recognized for their spiritually therapeutic properties. ‘Malt does more than Milton can/to justify God’s ways to man,’ wrote Housman in A Shropshire Lad. And for their service as a physical pain reliever— ‘Ale, man, ale’s the stuff to drink/for fellows whom it hurts to think.’

    Putting them together is an experience you may take on yourself if you are over 21, have $30, are flexible in your outer being and are ready to be guided through a brewery. It seems Beatree Yoga resides at 424 North 10th Street in Richmond while New Boswell Brewing Company is at 410 North 10th, a hop, skip and a jump away.

    If you decide to take on ‘Asanas & Ales’ which we highly (in so many ways) recommend, we assume you will be bending your whole body at Beatree before you begin to concentrate on those specific elbow exercises at New Boswell Brewing.

   We only add: “Hail to the Ale, and here’s to good neighbors!”

 

Matinees and theatre idylls

    Throughout the Whitewater Valley this week theatre performances are springing up like spring crocuses or croci.

    Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s is bringing its Off the Hill family series production of ‘The Short Tree And the Bird That Could Not Sing’ to the Oxford Community Arts Center on Sunday at 2 pm. The show is free, open to the public and recommended for ages five and up. The play by Dennis Foon is a wacky fable of an unlikely friendship between a tree that resents its roots and a spunky, unflappable bird with a horrible singing voice.

    At the same time on Saturday but repeated again on Sunday at 2 pm, Richmond Civic Theatre presents E. B. White’s wonderful mouse ‘Stuart Little’ in a two-day, story-theatre matinee. Stuart is an ordinary mouse born in New York who interacts with humans and other animals in charming and delightful ways.

    For something a little more adult and slightly more demanding, try the Benjamin Britten opera in English ‘Albert Herring’. It is a comedy set in an English countryside circa 1946 or so and will be performed Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings at MU’s Abegglen Theatre in the Center for Performing Arts, Oxford.

    Spamalot continues for one more week as the Richmond Civic Theatre’s offering this Friday and Saturday evening with a matinee on Sunday at the popular 2 pm. Spamalot is a live performance version of the movie ‘Monty Python and the Holy Grail.’

    Aurora’s Rivertown Players present The Radio Suspense Theatre this weekend in the City of Spires Museum. The mystery (or is it mysteries?) ‘A Deadly Wager – The Parakeets Vanish’ will be performed Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings with a matinee on Sunday.

    (Btw, the Rivertown Players will be holding auditions on April 26 & 27 for Lerner & Loewe’s ‘Brigadoon.’)

 

Local Music Scene

    We’ve heard tell of what some might call the ‘BMI Bad Guys’ contacting music venues in Franklin County to let them know that supporting live music has its consequences. Supporting in this case is when a local public establishment be it bar, restaurant, café or whatever, hires a band.

    You’d think putting musicians to work would be a good thing, and BMI is not saying it isn’t, it’s just not as simple as that. If a typical band plays three one-hour sets which are usually about 45 minutes long, it will play, say, 25% originals leaving 75% of the music they play written and published by someone else. Those writers and publishers have their rights and BMI has taken on the responsibility of policing them thar rights.

    From www.bmi.com/advocacy, “BMI’s primary goal is to ensure that our writers, composers and publishers are properly compensated for the public use of their music. This objective requires a multifaceted approach that involves educating about public policy and partnerships.”

    Let’s say the songwriter in that band which plays 25% originals has become a member of BMI, which as a songwriter is free, then BMI is ensuring he or she is “properly compensated for the public use of their music.” See? That’s how it gets complicated.

    By the way, you may consider this very article part of BMI’s “multifaceted approach” in that by calling local clubs to “educate them about public policy” BMI has caused a dynamic to change in our local entertainment options.

    At present writing we have fewer places where local bands can play while owners of these places, which had been hiring bands regularly before the BMI phone call, decide what they are going to do.

    They could hire musicians who play only original or public domain songs. Or hire bands that only play non-BMI songs. (One out of every two songs played on the radio are BMI-licensed music, according to the not-for-profit company’s website.)

    They could also get permission from the writers of the songs to use them in public performances, though this could be a tedious and rejection-filled occupation. They might try another form of entertainment like a comedy club. They could give up on live music or they could join BMI.

    Ideally after the clubs are educated, they will see the advantage of partnering with BMI. The goals are worthy, the costs are reasonable and the alternate is not acceptable.

    Rock on!

    (Let’s just hope ASCAP, who probably licenses the other fifty percent of music we want to hear, isn’t in the public education mode.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thoughts Through the Week

In writing about BMI, I got to thinking, ‘Hmm, Writers rights! Or in the case of Fox News, Righters write!’

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issue 142
March 25-31, 2014

 

Experience EcoMind at Earlham

    The best selling author and über foodie Francis Moore Lappé will be discussing her new book ‘Eco Mind: Changing the Way We Think to Create the World We Want’ in Earlham College’s Carpenter Hall this Friday. In it she takes on some notions that put up walls between us.

    One segment is called ‘Beyond Growth Versus No Growth’. She reiterates her goal for us, that is, to think like an eco-system, and, regarding the topic, reminds us “ever-evolving relationships define life forms and experience.”

    My problem with the book is that the ideas, albeit very, very important, tend to be nebulous. Consequently, she is responding to that nebulae in the only way she can with words forming concepts that are healing in their intention and arrangement but themselves vague and intellectually hazy like ‘ever-evolving relationships’ as an antidote to ‘Growth Versus No Growth’.

    I tend to agree, but when I go back in my mind to dig up the stuff and think about it, it, too, drifts away on a cloud of luminous gas.

    Her best selling book ‘Diet for a Small Planet’ was more concrete and therefore more immediately influential. I believe ‘EcoMind’ may be an influential book somewhere down the line and I believe that Ms Lappé believes that, too. She knows it is important. She knows it is nebulous and she knows it will take lots of small gatherings like the one at Earlham this Friday to not only sell the book, but bring EcoMind to life. It’s a daunting task and you can help her out considerably by simply being there.

    (In case Ms Lappé ever reads this, I suggest one concept regarding ‘Growth Versus No-Growth’, an economic state of Dynamic Equilibrium.)

 

Tuba or not Tuba’s

    Springtime is when a young man’s fancy turns to Sibelius or perhaps Mendelssohn or maybe even a brass fanfare by Paul Dukas. You know Spring, windy and warm one day, Nordic frost the next.

   Sunday afternoon at Earlham’s Carpenter Hall the Richmond Community Orchestra will show us what the last three months of rehearsals has wrought. We’re looking forward to hearing the tuba showcased in Bruce Broughton’s ‘Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra’. Curt Borntrager, a teacher at College Corner Middle School, will be playing the featured tuba.

    And speaking of Tuba’s. Did you know there’s a bar and restaurant in Batesville called Tuba’s Place. It’s on Park Avenue catty-corner from Batesville’s beautiful Liberty Park where they have an equally beautiful pavilion where live music is sometimes performed.     

    We say this because of our compulsive need to bring things together. So with no hope of ever seeing it come off, we recommend the folks at Batesville Parks and Recreation contact RCO’s principal trombonist Don Shrader (drshrader@earthlink.net) about having the orchestra visit. As Don said recently, RCO is a traveling orchestra and it takes just about as much to set up in Richmond, as it would in Batesville or anywhere else in the Whitewater Valley.

 

Gear heads get in free

    Lawrenceburg Speedway, conveniently located at the Dearborn County Fair Grounds on US 50, is opening the 2014 racing season with a gift to all its fans, free grandstand seating. Of course, if you want or need the pits you’ll have to pay for it: fifteen dollars, in this case.

    For the fanatic racing fan get there at 9 am when the pits open and watch as in time lapse as the racing season blooms anew. The first practice runs start at 10 am and racing begins at 2 pm or so.

    Lawrenceburg’s track is a small, 3/8 mile clay oval featuring sprint, modified, hornet and pure stock racing. The great thing about a small track is you can see it all from the grandstands. And there’s lots of action, not to mention sounds and the smells that only come from a small racetrack.

 

Grant awarded to study Whitewater River

    The meetings that were held recently in Harrison and Brookville regarding the state (and maybe even the fate) of the Whitewater River were paid for in part by a $158,469 grant recently received by the Dearborn County Soil and Water Conservation District. And you can expect to be hearing more from this group during this public outreach segment.

    The section of the Whitewater covered under this grant is roughly from Brookville to the Ohio River and public input is the key to this segment of river management.

    On-going sampling of river water quality by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, which started in November and will continue for about a year, will be used as base information for this effort at understanding and improving the river.

    Some local landowners who attended these meetings were concerned that this might be the thin edge of a government effort to take something from them, but we are assured this is not the case. As we understand it, this is a long-range plan to clean our river which is already pretty clean.

    The total grant was for $264,115, of which $105,646 will be provided by DC SWCD either as cash or in-kind labor. If you are interested in taking part, steering committees will be formed along the way and more public meetings are expected.

 

 

 

 


West Fork of the Whitewater

March 2014


Issue 141

March 18-24, 2014

 

Dancing with Stars and wild, wild women

   There’s a couple of ways to take in some high-end entertainment this Saturday in Richmond. At two o’clock be at the Wayne County Historical Museum to hear Steve Martin expound on Wayne County Women & Whiskey.

    Then at 5:30 trip the light fantastic over to the Lamplight Inn at the Leland to either catch or be part of the local ballroom competition, Dancing with the Stars (probably sans ‘stars’—present company excepted).

 

Bacchus and Aphrodite

    We like the concept of a BYOB party as part and parcel of a creative workshop. The Visual Arts Center of Preble County is holding an ‘Unwind & Create Workshop’ this Friday evening at the Visual Arts Center where you bring your favorite adult libation and create to your art’s content.

    If you’re looking for a nice armchair murder on a pseudo cruise with real-life dinner, the Preble County Art Association is offering ‘Murder on the Aphrodite’ on March 29th. Tickets are $40 and include a valuable surprise.

    The evening's events begin at 6 pm when guests will have the opportunity to purchase a balloon containing a prize worth at least $20, generously donated to the Arts Center by local businesses and individuals. Reserve by March 19 by calling 937 456-3999.

 

Exuberant, indomitable Spring

    In a few winks it will be Spring and we will no longer need to look for signs of. Those warm days we’ve had have awakened in us the first faint glimpses of growing anxiety. Growing anxiety is the feeling that you seriously need to be growing something.

    On one such day Neighbor Al dropped off a gardening catalogue, a sure symptom of growing anxiety. And who hasn’t paused for a moment to leaf through the packets of garden seeds which themselves have sprouted up full-grown on sometimes circular metal racks which you spin around to get the full effect of what you’re missing.

    We will soon be overcome by the exuberant, omnipresent rite of Spring when all of a sudden everything is everywhere sprouting rapidly, indomitably and you have to do your best to hack it back, cut it down and trim it off.

    To that end, the Dearborn County Home Builders Association is holding their fifth annual Home and Garden Show on March 21st, 22nd and 23rd at Agner Hall inside the Lawrenceburg fairgrounds. 

    According to inside sources, the DCHBA Home and Garden show has been a huge success in the past and showcases many of our local businesses displaying their products and offering their services.  The show includes free workshops, giveaways, a basket raffle, and a food court whose proceeds support a local charity.

 

Oxford Farmers Artistry

    We have to adjust our thinking about when we cash in on the rewards of our Spring gardening efforts. For those of us just seeding now, it will be months before we can lavish ourselves on our home grown healthy, fresh and delicious rewards. But there are others, we could call them season-breakers, who are using man’s (and woman’s) ingenuity to keep the market (that’s us as consumers) in produce.

    Last week Larry Slocum, the manager of Oxford Farmers Market (downtown), listed a surprisingly long list of available items including “apples, hydroponic lettuce, potatoes, squash, green onions, small pumpkins, kale, collards, radishes, turnips, cilantro and parsley, dried beans (cannellini, black turtle, kidney, Vermont cranberry, tiger eye), and other root crops.”

    In prompting us to attend last week’s market, he hinted, “ArtistryFarm will be there with free range eggs, some goat cheese, goat milk soaps made from Grandmother's recipe, baked goods made from whole-grains ground in the kitchen.”

    And while we’re on the subject, ArtistryFarm is celebrating April (27th) in the Country by offering two classes on Goat Milk Magic. One CHEESEmaking 101 is first at 1 pm on that last Sunday of the pre-merry month of April. In a limited size class you will make and take home a ready-to-eat fresh cheese.

    In the second at 3 pm turn goat milk into lye soap with Grandmother’s recipe. Says Debra Bowles, the art farmer of ArtistryFarm, “Age it a bit then use it. (It’s) simple purity for your skin.”

    The classes are $45 each and registering early is the thing to do in a small class.

 

Box Office and Spring duties

    We heard from Craig at Miami University Box Office about two things, one was a clarification on the role of the MU Box Office, the other was his personal plans for tending to the season.

    “If the university event requires a ticket (free or paid), the Box Office is very likely associated with providing the necessary ticketing services,” he wrote.

    The Guide published the incorrect number for the box office last week so forget that one. This is the number to use if you have any questions about a performance at Miami University, Box Office 513 529-3200.

    Regarding the great outdoors, he wrote, “My upcoming days include boiling maple sap from our 50 taps whenever the weather allows for a good sap run.”

    Craig is also starting over 2500 tomato plants which he grows for retail sales each spring. He plants 25+ varieties, including many heirlooms; all are organically grown, and will eventually end up in 16 oz cups to produce “very premium plants”.

 

 

 

 

Jawbone & Beaver Stump

March 2014


Issue 140 

March 11-17, 2014

 

South of Superior

    Anyone who’s driven over the Mighty Mac Bridge has tasted UPer culture. It’s just south of Superior and B. Jamerson will present a program on it. ‘Up in the U.P’ contains original stories about ski jumping, songs about iron mining and conversation about Cornish pasties and Finnish saunas. It’s about the culture and history of Michigan’s Upper Penninsula, it’s free and it takes place on Wednesday at the Hagerstown Public Library.

 

OK Okeana on Saturday

    You could do a twofer or even more in Okeana this Saturday. You might join Morgan Township in paying tribute to Congressional Medal of Honor winner PFC William B. Baugh. He was a Korean War veteran and was awarded the Medal posthumously.

The Morgan Township Historical Society will pay tribute 10 am in the Administration Building in Okeana. 

    After the program, the 1858 Morgan Township Museum, 6464 Okeana Drewersburg Road, will be open for tours until 2 pm.  Guests are welcome. Then if it’s a beautiful day you might drive over to Governor Bebb Park and visit the pioneer village, maybe take a walk on some of the trails there.

 

Theatrical Moon Over Buffalo

    The new digital events calendar at Miami U. is not as good as the one it abandoned. Case in point, ‘Moon Over Buffalo.’ This is a play to be played this Thursday through Saturday at the Wilkes Theatre in the Armstrong Center on the Oxford campus but try to find it listed in any of the calendars on the university’s website. We couldn’t. Anyway, despite MU’s best efforts at repressing the free expression of their theatre students (just kiddin’), the word is out. Oxford Visitors Bureau tells us there will be a ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ this week.

    While wandering lost in the new MU digi-mall we discovered ‘Peter Pan’ is coming to Studio 88 in the Center for Performing Arts on Miami’s Oxford campus in late April for six performances. It is presented by Zimmerman Experimental Theatre and promises to be edgy with flying humans on the latest techno-fibers.

    I wonder if it was MU’s intention all along to make finding things more difficult so we’d have to wander?

 

Local Music Scene

Up Close and Personal: It’s not like the Hearthstone is trying to keep their open mike night a secret; they just don’t have a mike and until I got there on Thursday evening not even a musician. So don’t expect a stage unless you look at it philosophically and consider this stage one of another effort to bring live music to the Whitewater Valley.

    It all started last week and, as music does sometime, kinda magically. Tom S. had talked to some people about the new open mike night. He didn’t say what time though and, for the record, it’s still anybody’s guess. The Hearthstone starts getting ready for dinner at 4 pm and if somebody like you is ready to play then (as we said in our days of youth and anarchy), Do it!

    The story goes, the bar had been empty on opening night for a couple of hours. Some players showed up, and when they began to play, the bar filled up with people. That was the magical part. Of course it might have been electronics.

    We can’t make any promises, but we heard the two guys who showed up on that first Thursday were so good they got hired and will do their first gig as Frank & Mitch this Saturday at the Hearthstone. They were staff favorites with their harmonies on Simon and Garfunkel like stuff.

    The take away here is not so much that Frank & Mitch will be performing, but they were slung-shot up from open mike night. Maybe it could happen to you. So that’ll be 4 to 10 pm Thursday night. BYO electronics.

 

Update on Cedar Grove Bridge

    It’s been awhile since we’ve updated you on the progress of turning the now abandoned and muzzled Cedar Grove Bridge into an observation park and hike/bike trail.    

    What’s come to light lately is the need for a unified vision of what exactly that park/trail is going to look like once INDOT transfers ownership of this historically significant cultural artifact to us, dba the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge. So we’re looking for someone to make an artist’s rendering of the bridge in all its future frippery, benches, pathways, lighting, the whole works.

    The Friends met last week and covered lots of ground, including a little visioning process where we cast ourselves forward some months and assume we were just given the ownership of the bridge. What would we need to do immediately? What next and so on?   

    We decided on insurance immediately and Ross Brown next. Ross Brown is the fellow we hope will restore the bridge for us. He works by hand and often as not by himself, taking a bridge apart piece by piece and either storing or restoring it.

   With the help of Indiana Landmarks, an application is being made to list Cedar Grove Bridge on the National Register of Historic Places. The bridge, which is 100 years old this year, is a double camelback with some unique attributes. This will answer a lot of outstanding questions and give everyone a steady platform of shared information about the bridge.

    When we realized we needed a graphic picture to help public presentations we also saw the need for creating bike trails on existing roads. We discussed a fund raising bike rally and outlined a route starting and ending at the bridge.

    Speaking of fundraising, you should send us a check. Ten bucks or so won’t hurt and it will go a long way to show the breadth of support we have for this project. All the money goes directly to the project. No one can touch it without the knowledge and okay of the Whitewater Canal Trail Board and the Friends of Cedar Grove Bridge.

    No one is getting paid to do this work, this keeping up the fight. It’s all volunteer. One point though, you could lose your money. It’s a bit of a gamble. That’s part of the fun of it. But then, while your money wouldn’t be returned to you (things don’t work that way), it would still be part of the general fund of the Whitewater Canal Trail and be applied to their continuing effort to complete the Trail from Metamora to Brookville.

    Anyway, to support the purchase and restoration of the Cedar Grove Bridge, please send a check to Cedar Grove Bridge, Whitewater Canal Trail, Inc., PO Box 126, Brookville, In 47012. Make the check out to Whitewater Canal Trail and in the Memo line write Cedar Grove Bridge.

    And thanks.

 

One Sparrow

 

Rolling Thunder awoke the morning sky

above the graying clouds rumbled

not yet vanquished by his all night vigil

Spattering raindrops tumbled as they fell

trembling between the weight of gravity

and the calling of the thunder being above.

 

Anon somewhere east of here

a Sun content to simply light overcast

arose to the calling of a single sparrow

Intrepid, indomitable, feathers soaked through

yet dreading not the rumbling above

to the rising in the east the slathered sparrow sung.

 

Lonely was his song for his fellows remained silent

on this morning when the voice of the west was nigh

When the all night rain dampened the zeal

of even the bravest heart

one who knew not what his betters decreed by their silence

One solo sparrow, one foolish fellow

raised his voice in a glee club of one

to the morning ritual of the rising sun.

 

One Sparrow’s mission –

To gather the clan,

to unite the tribe,

to re-grow the forest.

 

 

 

Gary Schlueter

Metamora

May 14, 2009

 

 


Ice Forms in Gold

Issue 139   See Whitewater Valley Weekly Calendar below and left

March 4-10, 2014


RSO exposes the Glories of Rococo

    Remind me again, what is Rococo?

    Think music that is flowery, ornate, graceful and witty.

    This Saturday at Civic Hall, the Richmond Symphony Orchestra dips into the rococo style with samples the music of the late 18th century. Pianist Soojin Ahn will play  concertos of Mozart, Haydn and more.

 

Storyteller of many cultures

    Oxford Community Arts Center is at it again. This Friday their Family Performance Series presents Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park traveling storyteller Diane Macklin. The event is free, starts at seven and looks like fun.

    Ms Macklin will be sharing tales from America, Africa, and other cultures.  A variety of characters will be introduced during her performance, and she will be utilizing many methods of storytelling, including chants, songs, music, and movement.

 

Make a sap of your trees

    It’s time to tap the maple trees. It comes once a year when the sap starts to rise. The season is probably late this year because of the brutally cold weather, but the brutality is abating and, like us, trees are eager to get their vernal juices flowing again.

    By our reading you have two options to get close-up and hands-on sticky with your fellow maple slurpers. The first is today.

    It’s Mardi Gras in New Orleans and maple syrup in Centerville, specifically at the Cope Environmental Center. It looks like the object today is to move you from station to interactive station where you’ll learn to tap trees, taste test the sap and be reinforced through demonstrations by pioneers and native peoples.

    It starts at four, so better hurry.

    If you can’t Cope, you might Hueston. That would be an annual all-day event called the Maple Syrup Festival centered in the beautiful Hueston Woods Lodge in the Ohio State Park of the same name in or near enough to College Corner, Ohio. This is the 48th annual and four family-friendly events are scheduled.

 

Fish Fry Friday

    Mentioning Fat Tuesday, we must mention the fish fry effect of Ash Wednesday. Fish fries will be everywhere this Friday. Yes it is the very catholic Fish Fry Friday, hard after Ash Wednesday. There will be two in Lawrenceburg, two in Harrison, one each in Crosby Township, and St. Teresa’s in Bright. And that’s just scratching the surface, barely scrapping the scales, so to speak.

 

Indiana regional arts and artisans

    Batesville Regional Fine Arts Fair happens this weekend at the RomWeber Marketplace. This 4th annual Rural Alliance for the Arts fair features work by southeastern Indiana artists and artisans.

    Friday is the special preview night with finger food and drinks for ten bucks starting at seven. Saturday and Sunday the show is open and free. Artists may still have time to register. Contact Ripley County Tourism Bureau  (888)747-5394, rctb@ripleycountytourism.com.

 

The logic of Trails

    Trails take us into Spring, not to the slush of the city but to the majesty of the natural Spring. Trails keep us alive to nature. They keep us in touch with our mechanical selves. They were here before we were and have gone everywhere with us as we’ve grown into whatever it is we’ve become.

    It’s odd that we have to think especially about trails, but in this day of motorcar madness someone has to speak up for pedestrians. You certainly know there are places cars can go where we can’t, that is we in our primary walking mode. We are all pedestrians but we are not all drivers of cars and trucks. Yet there are highways and roadways so designed that we, walkers all, are prohibited by law or by good sense to step upon them.

    That ain’t right!

    I remember my first trip through Indiana when I was searching for a home. It was a Saturday when I slashed into this rural hilly country from Camden, on Ohio SR 725 which changed to Indiana SR 44 before heading into Liberty then Connersville. I drove south, video taped the Whitewater Railroad on a morning run to Metamora and ended the travel day in a fine motel in Seymour at the corner of I-65 and US 50.

    Walking from my motel room at half-time for some food I realized there was no walkway, not a sidewalk, a curb or even a consideration about how a pedestrian might pass under the freeway on a major, historic United States highway and walk to the stores and strip malls on the Seymour side of I-65. There are countless other examples large and small where pedestrians have been excluded intentionally or otherwise. They simply prove this imbalance we’ve created by putting the car first.

    Pedestrians must come first in all our terrestrial plans but that they haven’t has created an imbalance. Trails make up for that imbalance because they can go places where cars and trucks can’t. Take yourself upon the Wolf Creek Trail on the west side of lower Brookville Lake and you will see this is true.

    Pedestrians need places where the automotive world can’t get to them. And since we are pedestrians first, we need those places. Those places are trails. Therefore we need trails and the more the better.

 

A shout out for new trails

    We applaud the news State Rep. Jud McMillin relayed on Sunday. Apparently like minds are looking at creating trails in Franklin County that will fit into the Whitewater Valley’s growing trail network.

    He specifically mentioned a grant which if granted would create a trail linking Brookville Town Park along the tailwater to the extensive Brookville Lake system. On St. Patrick’s Day, or thereabouts, they expect to hear word about the grant.

    The plan is to connect through the Army Corps of Engineers lakeside property with the Whitewater Valley Land Trust system through Union and Wayne Counties. He also  mentioned potentially creating trails running west towards Connersville and east towards Liberty.

    Rep. McMillin didn’t mention the Land Trust by name but we feel that would be the next logical step since its system of land preserves reaches south to Brownsville on the East Fork two miles from the west finger of the upper lake.

    If and when completed this tailwater trail will point Franklin County trail attention northwards towards Union County: Egypt Hollow, Stillhouse Hollow, Quakerstown, Dunlapsville and eventually North Treaty Line Road where the river begins again and the link with the Brownsville Land Trust property is within shouting distance (if you have a loud voice).

 

 

Issue 138

Feb. 25-Mar. 4


Robert of Maplehurst

    The Works of Robert Coveney are the works of a winner. He won last year’s Preble County Art Association juried show and these paintings in watercolors and oils will explain in graphic detail why.

    Mr. Coveney works out of Maplehurst Studios in Eaton, Ohio where he lives. He studied art at Miami and Indiana Universities, is now retired from Miami and thus is probably coming into his flowering as an artist.

 

Soul searching children’s theatre

    Main Stage Theatre is presenting ‘The Giver’ this weekend at Earlham College which seems a fine place to question the truths on which our society is based. Or perhaps we’d rather just question the value of the power of choice. Either way, The Giver is the avenue. It is based on a play by Eric Coble from the book by Lois Lowry.

    Since it was commissioned by Oregon Children’s Theatre we will assume that Jonas, the primary character, is someone a child can relate to. Jonas' world is nearly perfect, no war, fear, pain or hunger, but joy, love, and choice are also missing.

    At the Ceremony of the Twelves, Jonas is assigned a role that puts him on a path very different from his friends and family. As he receives special training from the Giver, Jonas begins to realize the potential of human experience and question the Truths on which his society is based.

    ‘The Giver’ will be at Earlham’s Wilkinson Theatre this Friday and Saturday evening.

 

Good Goddard Guildenstern!

    The boards of Goddard Auditorium will thunder this Spring, first with a rare appearance by the elegant queen of legumes, Frances Moore Lappé of ‘Diet for a Small Planet’ fame who will speak her new ‘Eco-Mind’ on March 28th.

    The best work of the Bard is said to be ‘Hamlet’ which happens to be highlighting a mini-Shakespeare festival on the season opening Spring weekend of April 4th & 5th. Hamlet appears on Friday night at Goddard followed on Saturday night with a modern play about two characters from Hamlet, Tom Stoppards’ ‘Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead’.

    Ah the good olde days. They’re coming up in March and April.

 

There will be jugglers

    And speaking of Shakespeare and projecting ourselves into the future, ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ and ‘Romeo and Juliet’ will be performed in the round and in repertory from June 6-15. The setting will be Richmond’s Starr-Gennett piano factory which will be converted into a 150-seat theatre.

    According to Nancy Sartain, “The park-like area surrounding the amphitheater will be converted into a festival plaza with performers, art displays, activities such as jugglers, and food.”

    If this rattles your chain mail, check out www.richmondshakespearefestival.org for more details.

 

Walking on the World Wide Web

    Last summer Phil Anderson was doing research on walking tours for the Whitewater Canal Byway Association. Centerville was one of the communities he electronically visited and as usual in this kind of research the library was the mother lode of information. (By the way, I saw somewhere last week that there more libraries in the United States than McDonald’s outlets. Yay us!)

    The walking tours take visitors on a self-guided tour of the historic main streets of several select communities, like Centerville. (Who could ever leave Centerville out of anything Whitewater Valleyish?) WCBA President Candy Yucak said they have two more to complete for the first round and expects the task to be complete within a month.

    Afterwards they will be mounted on the organization’s newly designed website and be available to the public touring the Whitewater Valley, both actually and digitally.

    Candy said the tours are “very interesting. I’m always learning more and more about this incredible valley we live in.”

 


Gary August Schlueter

 

 

 

Frivol-Pillow

Feb 18-24

 

‘Hey Big Spenda’

    This is Big Splurge week in the Whitewater Valley and thereabouts. First off it’s black tie optional from Oxford town to Connersville to Metamora and that’s just Thursday night.   

    Upscale Saturday includes Tea at Three at Annie’s Classics Café at the Lawrenceburg Library. At five pm the Big Splurge continues with an Artzzy Party in the Harmony Crown Room three stories above Main Street in beautiful downtown Brookville.

    An hour later you are required at the Oldenburg Academy for the Silver Anniversary of their Reverse Raffling. For those still up for the black tie action Millett Hall back in old Oxford would suit you to that tie with a Wine Tasting Gala & Auction. The ante’s steep but what the heck, it’s Big Splurge week.

    It wouldn’t be expected but it might happen that someone wears a red dress to one or two of these events, all the while intending to appear at the Red Dress Ball in the Kuhlman Center on North Salisbury Road in Richmond sometime from evening to night.

    Or you could go tubing for a good cause down Perfect Slopes.

    And on top of that there’s a frivolous pillow on display at Leeds Gallery, Earlham.

    What more can a citizenry want?

 

Big Name of the Week

 

Suits by Armani

    Posed in dark Italian the light behind them throws their shadows across a steel-colored floor, a pic-face spot for each catches The Tenors in the best light. Click! There’s your cover. Cool shoes, too.

    The Tenors croon in Oxford on Thursday in Hall Auditorium. Judging by the schedule, this is something of an honor. This falls into the ‘Good Catch, Miami U. Performing Arts Series’ category.

    It looks like the place names The Tenors are about to inhabit with their music covers most of the seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms which formed the original English Heptarchy. From the north folk in Northhamptonshire down to the south folk in Suffolk and even to the mid-folk of Middlesex they’ll be singing. And here they are on Thursday within easy driving distance.

    Definitely a cool shoes night.

 

Local Music Scene

    Gathering from Yahoo!, at Rockies Bar & Grill can be had casual fun in an ambiance featuring dancing in a bar late at night. Jay Jesse Johnson and his band plan to uphold the Rockie tradition by playing this Saturday until 1:30 in the a of m when words are drawn out and sound different than say 10 o’clock.

    By the map on Industrial Access Road, Rockies is engulfed by the Rising Star Casino whose industry includes another kind of industrial access which sometimes leads to egress of industrial excess in what might otherwise be called per capita.

    Rockies Bar & Grill is ‘larger and in better shape than the other bars in Rising Sun,’ one ‘rain maker’ Yahoose to us. So if there’s any of the ‘Hey, big spenda’ in ya, and you love hot, home cooked blues you have got your Saturday covered.

    Music, tables, side-shows, faces to see, lavish bathrooms with lighting and mirrors that make you look good, views of the Mighty Ohio at night, plush carpets, mingled cologne, perfumes, sweat from him, mist from her, the alluring despair lurking, the high rise hopes at your fingertips, the Casino.

 

Spring forward

    Yesterday ‘A Frivolous Nature’ officially began. We like to see it as the first sign of Spring, though we think it frivolous to hope for spring before March 7th. We do hope for it before then but we do it frivolously and under that caution continue to search for those signs saying this nasty winter has broken its back.  Not that it’s over; it will never be over; it is Winter; it just rolls under.

    Megan Abajian’s ‘A Frivolous Nature’ is at Earlham College’s Leeds Gallery until March 21, roughly the official rolling over of Spring.

    Anyway holding up this artificial flower, a slightly psychedelic papier-mache daisy, it’s time to say, ‘Heeeere’s Megan!’

    Leeds Gallery reports, “Megan makes decorative, feminine paintings that thrive in the exciting realm between craft and art. She engages in creating the pictorial illusions of space found in traditional landscapes and still life paintings, playing flat forms against organic color fields. The work is formal, taking pleasure in color and pattern while using nature as a source of abstraction.”

    And she calls it ‘Frivolous’.

 

Extricate the ghost images

    One subscriber has been receiving a duplicate picture of a little girl in pink with a goat above the lead picture of the week. I contacted iContact where Jack diagnosed a Cache full of Cookies and recommended dieting and deleting regularly.

    But seriously, Browser Cache is like the ghost of hundreds of thousands of data files, useful when visiting the same sites by utilizing that ghostly Cache to speed up your visit. But otherwise it hangs around like cob webs clouding the free flow of information. In the case of iContact and the girl in pink with the goat, it seems the cache build up of electronic cobwebs is perhaps bringing back that picture.

    It’s electronically eerie and disturbing. It is certainly unintended and where does that fit on the scientific scale of one to whatever? Definitely on the ‘whatever’ side of WYSIWYG, GIGO, Fortran and Kabal.

    According to iContact Jack, ‘Clearing the Cache and Cookies in a browser helps fix these issues. Here's a link for your reference that will walk you through how to clear cache and cookies for known browsers: http://www.wikihow.com/Clear-Your-Browser%27s-Cache.

    The Whitewater Valley Guide makes no recommendation that you utilize the above website, except to say we’ll probably give it a try one of these days.

 

 

Zinky Smith's dock, Water Bay, St. Thomas.

(See 'Shameless Self-Promotion' below)


Feb 11-17, 2014

 

The not-muchness of Valentine’s Day

    Last Saturday we saw a couple of early Valentine’s Day celebrations. We think that might have been because Valentine’s Day falls on a Friday this year and folks feel this most romantic of made-up holidays can only be celebrated properly on a Saturday which, if you remember, is followed by Sunday, a day of rest (and sometimes recuperation).

    By our reckoning (and our calendar) there is no special interest in announcing Valentine’s Day happenings on Friday though Taffy’s of Eaton has a heart-shaped event called Sweet Art Auction this Saturday evening. Now Sweet Art is not Sweet Heart but it’s close. All you have to do is drop the ‘He’ which we do not recommend in a case of true romance, at least not in Indiana where our elected representatives in Indianapolis are doing their best to abolish such Californicated notions.

    So for those who want traditional romance on Valentine’s Day we recommend a night in Richmond, highlighted by a visit to the Richmond Civic Theatre for a performance of Pride and Prejudice, where in the book after about 600 pages the heroine and hero do finally come together to live happily ever after. Ah sweet fiction!

    Another romantic, make that bro-mantic, event on Friday night is a screening of Casablanca at the Gibson Theater where as we all remember the hero does not get the girl in the end but does walk off onto the darkening tarmac (of Van Nuys Airport, btw) with the Vichy chief of police.

 

Blues for the night after

    For those droop-eared dogs who didn’t or wouldn’t find a date for Valentine’s Day Saturday might be a time to sing the blues. If so we recommend CC Tavern in West College Corners, almost straddling the Ohio/Indiana border. There the Jay Jesse Johnson Band makes a rare home-town (kinda) appearance.

    The first time we heard the music of Jay Jesse Johnson was a few years ago in Metamora at Meeting House Antiques. Dave, the owner, had a CD of Jay Jesse and was raving about it. We both loved it and decided on the spot that he and his band would be the centerpiece in a Metamora Blues Festival which we couldn’t quite pull off due to reasons too complicated for anything less than another short story which would have to be fiction to protect the people and the obstacles we encountered.

    (But it wouldn’t be Metamora without obstacles, after all a canal runs through it and if that doesn’t create sides I don’t know what does.)

    CC Tavern has been the scene of some great music over the years and this promises to be one of those nights.

 

Local Music Scene

   What could be more local than a band named the Local Legends? On the other hand, if and when they go national what good is a name like Local Legends? (You needn’t answer either one of those questions, btw.)

    But you might want to hear them perform in order to make up your own mind whether they are either of the L words. The Metamora-based (at least for now) outlaw country blues rockers are working more original stuff into their repertoire and are working two gigs back to back this week.

    The first is Thursday night at Borderline Bar & Grill, another of those places almost straddling the state line, this time the Indiana/Ohio line. It’s on Old US 52 near the stoplight in downtown West Harrison and the Legends play from eight to midnight.

    Then on Friday night, the Local Legends will be the second band to play for the new owner at the Hearthstone on that same US 52 but this time not the ‘old’ one, and this time not in Harrison but in Metamora. Again the hours are eight to midnight. 


New art and live music

    Probably the biggest Valentine’s Day gala in the entire Whitewater Valley is happening at the Oxford Community Arts Center on College Avenue in the college town of Oxford, Ohio and has nothing specifically to do with Valentine, Jimmy, the saint or the card. They call it Second Friday because, well, you can probably figure that out for yourself and as usual with Second Fridays, is filled with things to do.

    There’s music by the Back Porch Hounds. We understand their sound is best described as old obscure music with a slightly modern edge. 

    Two new art exhibits will also premier on Second Friday, STAY by Kate Carlier Currie and Alysia Fischer, and HONOR: The works of Crossan Curry. A poem serves as the conduit between the two artists. In Jane Hirshfield’s poem ‘The Promise’ everything leaves or changes except for love. 

    Fischer’s objects for the head attempt to capture the imagery of the poem, particularly as it relates to aging and the passage of time.  Currie’s stop motion animation explores the idea that though we may long to get back those we have lost, in fact we carry with us the love and insights we have gained from those relationships and carry that with us forever.

    HONOR: The works of Crossan Curry is a intimate gathering crossing four decades of the local artist's work. These works on print, acrylics, glass, bronze, and carved gourd are on generous loan from various collectors including Stuart Sugg and our friend Debra Bowles.

 

Byway Association’s annual dinner

    The Whitewater Canal Byway Association is holding its annual dinner on Thursday, February 20, at 6 pm in the old depot at the Whitewater Valley Gateway Park on US 52 in Metamora.

    Highlights of the evening will include a tour of our new Whitewater Visitors Pavilion and the announcement of this year’s winner of the ‘Spirit of the Byway Award’.

    There will be a catered dinner complete with desserts created by our lady members. Reservations are required and seating is limited. Cost of the dinner is $14.95 per person.

Call 765-647-2541 or by email at copperron@aol.com to reserve.

 

Shameless self-promotion

    In yet another attempt to smash the great piñata of literary success, to take another grasp at the elusive brass ring as the Valley turns, I offer you my latest short story entitled ‘What the Sea Creatures Know’. It is set on St. Thomas in the glorious 80s and is based on a true story of a Frenchee fisherman who actually predicted an earthquake.

    So if the winter weather is wearing on you yet you simply can’t find the time to fly to the Caribbean, here, at least, is a mental break. Click on Thoughts Through The Week on the left for ‘What the Sea Creatures Know.’ 

 

 

Gary August Schlueter

February 4-10, 2014

 

Pride and Prejudice, the play

    Three weeks ago we noted a literary uprising of sorts in Wayne County. The works of Jane Austen is being featured at the Centerville Public Library in a regular film and discussion series. It’s free and the latest edition happens this Saturday at 2 pm if you want to join in.

    That week (January 14-20, to be exact) the Gennett Mansion offered ‘A Jane Austen Evening” which promised an appearance by Ms Austen herself.

    Now, as the plot unfolds, we begin to see why all this Austenization has been going down. We believe there’s been a conspiracy among the community cultural folks to prepare us for this week’s performance of ‘Pride and Prejudice’ at the Richmond Civic Theatre. The play is adapted from the novel by James Maxwell and directed by David Cobine and takes place Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

    In their press release RCT tells us, “The play is the story of the duel between Elizabeth and her pride and Darcy and his prejudice. Will pride and prejudice meet halfway?”

    I would suggest that the group at Centerville Library on Saturday discuss that statement. To me, the pride and prejudice of the title is housed completely within the female lead Elizabeth. Let me know how that comes out, will ya?

 

Alphatron’s at it again

    And speaking of novels which are just not content to stay within their hard copy covers, the Arts and Lecture Series at Earlham College is presenting ‘The Intergalactic Nemesis, Live-Action Graphic Novel, Book Two: Robot Planet Rising’ this Saturday in Goddard Auditorium.

    Here’s what we know about it: “The year is 1933. When the robot emissary Elbee-Dee-Oh disappears in deep space, it's up to Molly Sloan to rescue him. If only it were that simple. Because at that same time, and unbeknownst to her, her former fiancé Dr. Lawrence Webster has miraculously arrived on Robonovia, the Cerebretron is malfunctioning, Timmy has only just begun to master his telekinetic powers, a sinister robot named Alphatron is up to something terribly nefarious, and the duplicitous Soviet spy Natasha Zorokov has followed Dr. Webster through the Galactascope.”

    The evening is dedicated to ‘the kid in everyone’ and no previous Intergalactic experience is necessary. Helpful, but not necessary.

 

Calling all cold fingered artists

    “If Jack Frost has inspired you with the wintry weather or if you have a piece from winters gone by we want to see it!” says the Preble County Art Association. Drop off your work this Thursday from 1 to 7 pm at the Preble County Art Center. It’s five bucks per piece for non-PCCA members and a max of two pieces can be entered in this juried show.

    “All media and subject matter is eligible for entry, and though it seems like this year’s snow flurries will go on forever we ask that your entries do not, so please keep them from exceeding 24”x24”x24” in any direction.”

    The show will run from February 11 through March 28. Winners will be announced at the reception on March 6. For more details call 937 456-3999.

 

Square Dance and Potluck

    On the first Friday of every month you have a chance to shake your booty, stomp, spin, dozy doe and swing yer partner round ‘n’ round at the Oxford Community Square Dance and Potluck. But, of course, you might want to limit that partner swinging business to the square dance part. Potluck food lines are no place for that kind of frivolity.

    According to Judy Waldron, who is the dance caller and founding member of Jerico Old Time Band (the providers of le musique), “The gathering starts with a potluck at 6:30 pm followed by dance instruction for beginners at 7:30 and a general square dance at 8 pm.”

    The cost is only $7 and if you can pass for someone under sweet 16, you get in free and Yippee! 

 

The over 50 business crowd in Harrison

    The Harrison Press recently published a story by historian Terry Viel entitled ‘Shop local was the clarion call in 1949.’ It reported 71 Harrison businesses supported the call to shop local and of those, only nine still survive today.

    According to Terry, “The two banks are still serving Harrison very well, the Harrison Home Bakery, still emitting those irresistible aromas of the donuts, the two funeral homes, the Harrison Press, Valley Welding, and Huisman Poultry.” The ninth is Perrine Lumber of which Terry wrote, “I believe Perrine Lumber is Harrison’s oldest surviving business.”

    We agree with Terry, “All of the businesses in downtown still need your support just as in 1949.”

 

Don’t believe everything you read

    Metamora is not likely to be renamed Vera City any time in the near future. First of all it’s not a city, secondly there’s very little veracity in Metamora, at least in Metamora’s historic signage. This little known fact came to light in an email from Franklin County historian Don Dunaway.

    He said someone asked him for information about Gilbert Van Camp “who founded a canning company in Indianapolis.” Don wrote, “I see there is a plaque on the one time Van Camp store saying the explosion that killed Gilbert’s mother occurred in 1851. Her tombstone in the Duck Creek Cemetery gives a date of death of August 9, 1870.”

    While the plaque doesn’t mention Gilbert, founder of Van Camp’s Pork and Beans, the general street knowledge around Metamora is that Gilbert lived here and moved to Indy after the explosion. A Metamora Merchants publication from 1979-80 confirmed that less than factoid. Don directed us to a Wikipedia report stating that Gilbert Van Camp was born in Brookville, Indiana, started his business career there, moved to Greensburg, lived and worked there from 1845 to 1860 and then to Indianapolis in 1861.

    The Merchant handout said Van Camp’s Pork and Beans “fed the armed forces during the Cival (sic) and Spanish American Wars.” But two other sources say that Gilbert’s son Frank was credited with the development of Van Camp’s canned pork and beans recipe in 1894” which would have been 30 years after the (sic) Cival War.

    Another sign behind the mill in Metamora tells gullible tourists and others that the water wheel beside the mill is powered by the canal, but that’s not true either. It could be powered by the water falling about five feet at Lock 52 but instead the wheel is powered by electricity.

    Metamora might not be called Vera City, but it could be called Electri City if we harnessed the potential of the canal to generate power as was done until the 1930s when rural electrification made the business unprofitable. Now with the cost of that rural electricity at sixteen cents per kilowatt hour, it might be profitable again.

    So what is the common theme here? Don’t believe everything you read (including this).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rich Mullins (RIP)


Issue 134 

Jan 28-Feb 3, 2014

 

Ground Hog Day

   Sunday is Ground Hog Day though why any self-respecting Whistle Pig would venture out of its comparatively warm underground burrow in February is beyond me, unless it was to give us all lessons in effective hibernation for which, if I was its agent, it would be paid handsomely in fresh produce from the greenhouses still pushing up such truck.

 

Oxford classical Sunday

   Like the groundhog that has been sleeping the winter away, Oxford culture has suddenly come to life this week. As an antidote to Super Bowl madness on television, there’s a guest recital at 7:30 Sunday evening by highly acclaimed violist Kevin Nordstrom and globe trotting pianist Edward Neeman, currently working to an advanced degree at Julliard.

   This will be 7:30 in Souers Recital Hall in the beautiful Center for Performing Arts on Miami’s Oxford campus.

   Barely two and a half hours earlier, in the same place, pianist Siok Lian Tan highlights the MU Faculty Recital. Both events are free and if taken together, allow plenty of time for a campus crawl, pub bump and slow early dinner.

 

Richmond’s Rich Mullins

   There are stars in genre of music that fly across our skies unseen by those who do not partake of that sound. If you, like me, have never heard the name Rich Mullins, maybe you, like me, are not a fan of Christian Rock. Living and dying in the span of 41 years, , Rich Mullins made what are considered modern classics of Christian music.

   He was born in Richmond and to Richmond he returns in the form of a movie.

To get caught up with the Rich Mullins epoch, we recommend you attend the screening of ‘Ragamuffin: The True Story of Rich Mullins’ this Sunday afternoon at the Richmond Art Museum.

 

Arises a true steward of place

   Downtown Richmond has scored a coup of no insignificant measure with the opening of Room 912 on Main Street and it comes off with a bang this Friday with the commencement of Richmond’s Meltown Winter Ice Festival.

   IU East has moved its art program to the 900 block of Main Street and with it offers students an art gallery, classroom and studio space. The public is intentionally part of the IU East art experience via Room 912.

   This Friday you are invited to wonder through the gallery, check out the standing show “Regional Impact: Faculty Work from the IU Regional Campuses,” listen to some live music and watch art in the happening.

   The art happening is a live block of ice being sculpted into an ice-wolf or maybe an ice-coywolf depending on the snout, the ears and the length of the hind legs. The ribbon cutting is at 6 pm and the ice sculpting begins at 6:30 or thereabouts.    

   Probably not coincidentally, the Wayne County Chamber ribbon cutting ceremony also kicks off that three-day celebration of this hard winter, The Meltdown Winter Ice Festival. The entire 900 block of Main Street will be Ice Festival central. Several other ice sculptings will be created on the spot for the inevitable Meltdown. “Impressive ice fights” and lively winter activities for all ages are on the agenda throughout the weekend from Friday through Sunday.

   With this opening IU East brings art education to downtown Richmond and, doing business as Room 912, will participate in daily life and the continuous rejuvenation of Main Street. Like I said, no small coup. Downtown Richmond is already haunted (or blessed) by Earlham College students. Now something the color of art will be mixed in the current milieu through students, artists and patrons of IU East’s Room 912.

   Speaking for her fellow IU East art students Kayla Flora recognized, “In our downtime, we have the opportunity to explore local shops and meet local business owners. Thus, we are provided with a sense of local history that will influence and will be translated in our artwork.”

   The fine arts major at IU East continued, “The studio offers a space dedicated solely to the creation of artwork while teaching us the importance of working in a studio environment both now and after graduation.”

   That hundred plus year stalwart of Whitewater Valley culture, the Richmond Art Museum, also sets foot on Main Street through this opening. RAM classes began on January 23 with an Adult Art Education class taught by Tom Butters.

   “Room 912 was created in order to provide additional space for gallery exhibitions and our growing fine arts program,” said Katherine Frank, dean of Humanities and Social Sciences at IU East. “We chose downtown Richmond due to its rich history, expanding business community, and future potential.”

     “As a regional institution with a mission focused on contributing to the cultural and economic development of the communities we serve, this was the perfect opportunity to position IU East as a true steward of place and to promote the partnerships so important to strengthening our community.”

   Dean Frank added, “We urge businesses and organizations to think about interesting possibilities for collaboration involving Room 912. . . .

   “We welcome new ideas and new partnerships and look forward to the ways that we can all work together in the downtown area and throughout our community to feature and leverage the positive points of potential throughout Richmond and Wayne County.”

   We would only add, ‘and the Whitewater Valley.’

 

Teenage confessions in song and diary

   Nicole Johndrow was a teenage optimist.

   How optimistic was she? you might well ask.

   So optimistic she is willing to show you her diary in a program she has devised entitled: ‘Mixtape Confessions-The Diary of a Teenage Optimist.’

   It appears that Ms Johndrow has created a hybrid entertainment form designed to show her off to best advantage in writing, singing and performance media.

   It is a multi-media show years in the making. Nicole when she was but a wee Nicolette kept an audio-tape diary from which she created this show. With multi-media the trick is not how much you use, but how you use it. The show is said to be “gracefully staged and moved like clockwork.”

   Besides the sheer entertainment value of a live performer in a polished two-act show, these Mixtape Confessions reach into the realm of hybridization. So to inoculate yourself, make it to Oxford Community Arts Center this Friday and/or Saturday at 7 pm.

 

10,000 Yecks

   Friday is another twofer day in Oxford. For the culturally energetic, we recommend you attend the 2014 Miami University Young Painters Competition. The prize is the $10,000 William and Dorothy Yeck Award.

   Juror Timothy McDowell, artist and curator at Connecticut College, will be lecturing at 4 pm in the MU Art Building, followed at 5:15 by a reception and half hour later by the award ceremony itself. This year’s competition focuses on non-representational works.

 

Now for something completely different

   String players are in demand for the March 30th Spring Concert performance of the Richmond Community Orchestra. Monday was the RCO strings-only rehearsal. Next Monday the full orchestra begins rehearsing from 6:30 to 8:30 in Goddard Auditorium at Earlham. The orchestra meets every Monday and the Spring Concert will be in Goddard as well on that happy spring Sunday.

   For more information, email RCO VP Don Shrader drshrader@earthlink.net.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013 William and Dorothy Yeck Award winner, Robert Anderson Kitchen, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issue 133 

January 21-27, 2014

 

The beat goes on

   This being Tuesday which I’m writing on Sunday, yesterday was Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, “and”, as Sonny and Cher once sang, “the beat goes on.”

   Barbara Cross survived the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. Ms Cross is the Martin Luther King Jr. speaker at a special program hosted by Indiana University East in peace loving Richmond. (Peace loving if we don’t consider the battle for the county seat in the 1870s.)

   The event is free and open to the public. Cross is the daughter of the late Rev. John Cross, the pastor of the church when the bombing occurred, killing four girls.

   Cross and her father were in the Spike Lee documentary ‘4 Little Girls,’ which was nominated for an Oscar. The film will screen at IU East’s Graf Center on campus at noon and 5:30 pm today in IU East’s Graf Center in the Whitewater Valley Community Room.

   In other words, you missed the first showing already. So this is more a tribute to the event, than a call to come. But still, the beat goes on.

 

Local Music Scene

   It’s like high society in Batesville is communicating with itself so that no weekend goes by without some kind of a special local activity. Last week it was Nashville singer Kinsey Rose at the Gibson Theatre. This week it’s The Red Hot Whiskey Slippers at the Batesville Library.

   The Slippers kick off the 2014 ‘After Hours’ concert series, which is also start of the 15th concert season. Fifteen years of high quality music and all for free. Makes you wonder how they do it. But don’t wonder too loud. You remember the old adage about not looking a gift horse in the mouth? Well this isn’t quite that but it’s similar.

   The Red Hot Whiskey Slippers play a jazz, funk version of New Orleans music, and yes, I have no idea what that might be, but I know where I can give it a hearing—Saturday night on Walnut Street in Batesville at an after hours show.

   (‘After Hours’ at 7 pm, hmmm?)

 

Hail to Morrisson-Reeves!

   A tribute to going on and on and on (with each ‘on’ having a value of 50 years) is the 150th anniversary celebration this Saturday of Morrisson-Reeves Library. This event kicks off an entire year of various programs designed to signify this landmark.

   Starting around noon, they will have guitarists vocalists, keybordists, a trio, a Rond, and a dulcimer group promising to make sweet sounds on the Upper Level of old, accomplished Morrisson-Reeves standing as a beacon, a monument, an island of and to human intelligence on North Street in Richmond.

   Come early on Saturday and besides hearing the first performers of the day you are more likely to receive a goody bag. 150 are available, one for each MRL year.

   Morrisson-Reeves is a Richmond treasure and well worth a visit. Mark your mental calendar and make room some time this year to explore it. You’ll be the richer for it.

 

‘For the benefit of its inhabitants forever’

   In researching a little history of Morrisson-Reeves I came upon a treasure trove (if the ‘treasure’ is a little history of M-R). Naturally, the library itself is the place to begin, and when you live in a digital world, you visit the digital library and find:

     “Morrisson-Reeves Library in Richmond, Indiana is one of the oldest public libraries in the state. It opened in 1864, long before similar sized communities acquired such facilities through the help of Andrew Carnegie. Richmond's benefactor was one of its earliest prominent citizens, Robert Morrisson.”

   “Morrisson spent $12,000 for the lot at the corner of what is now North A and 6th Streets and the brick building which was erected on that lot. He gave an additional $5,000 to a library committee with which to buy books. The new library was duly named the Morrisson Library, and it opened on July 30, 1864 with approximately 6,000 books.… He gave the donation to "Wayne Township, Wayne County, Indiana, in trust for the benefit of its inhabitants forever."

 

The two-artist portrait

   “In appreciation of his generous gift, a committee of citizens commissioned John C. Wolfe to paint a life-sized portrait of Morrisson, which was hung in the reading room of the new library. Apparently these citizens felt that the likeness to the original was not what it should be, and they subsequently commissioned Marcus Mote, a local Quaker artist, to repaint Morrisson's head, making this a painting created by two artists. If one looks closely, one can see a difference in the style of painting between the head and the rest of the painting.

   The first sustaining librarian was Sarah Wrigley, daughter of John Finley, Palladium editor and poet whose work Hoosiers Nest is “widely recognized as the first literary use of the word Hoosier.” As the excerpts below show it also describes Hoosiers’ pioneer lifestyle and character to a T while giving us another linguistic plum — “Hoosieroons’ described thusly—

   ‘With mush-and-milk, tin-cups, and spoons,

     White heads, bare feet, and dirty faces . . .’

The Hoosiers Nest (in part)

By John Finley

 

Blest Indiana! in thy soil

Are found the sure rewards of toil,

Where honest poverty and worth

May make a Paradise on earth.

 

He is (and not the little-great)

The bone and sinew of the State.

With six-horse team to one-horse cart,

We hail here from every part;

 

The emigrant is soon located-

In Hoosier life initiated:

Erects a cabin in the woods,

Wherein he stows his household goods.

At first, round logs and clapboard roof,

With puncheon floor, quite carpet proof,

And paper windows, oiled and neat,

His edifice is then complete.

When four clay balls, in form of plummet,

Adorn his wooden chimney's summit.

Ensconced in this, let those who can

Find out a truly happier man.

The little youngsters rise around him,

So numerous they quite astound him;

Each with an ax or wheel in hand,

And instinct to subdue the land.

 

A stranger found a Hoosier's Nest -

In other words, a buckeye cabin,

 

The stranger stooped to enter in -

The entranced closing with a pin -

And manifested strong desire

To seat him by the log-heap fire,

Where half-a-dozen Hoosieroons,

With mush-and-milk, tin-cups, and spoons,

White heads, bare feet, and dirty faces,

Seemed much inclined to keep their places.

 

No matter how the story ended;

The application I intended

Is from the famous Scottish poet,

Who seemed to feel as well as know it,

That "buirdley chiels and clever hizzies

Are bred in sic' a way as this is."

 

 

 

Issue 132


January 14-20,2014

 

Ancient author re-appears

   Jane Austen is making a comeback in and around Richmond. (I wonder if it has anything to do with Downton Abbey?) In the calendar last week the Guide listed the Jane Austen Movie Series at Centerville Library. This Saturday the Gennett Mansion will be the site of ‘A Jane Austen Evening.’

   Not only will there be visits from characters out of her books but Jane Austen herself will make an appearance, we are told. Expect music, dancing, tea, cakes and parlor games with your glimpse into the English countryside around East Main in Richmond. Bring your imagination.

 

Local Music Scene

   Kinsey Rose is a singer/songwriter originally from Louisville, now living in Nashville. She’ll be playing the Gibson Theatre in Batesville this Saturday, according to the Gibson’s website.

   We are told, “Tourists and locals alike are occasionally lucky enough to catch Kinsey singing in the cramped quarters of one of Nashville’s honky-tonk bars but she is better known for her many appearances singing for Nashville’s NHL hockey team, the Predators.

     “Kinsey keeps a busy schedule as one of Nashville’s most in-demand female demo singers and has also found a home among Music City’s elite background vocalists.”

 

Hearthstone breaks out in music

   The sign outside the Hearthstone Restaurant usually touts the hours its open, but a few weeks ago it announced Clint Lewis and his band was scheduled. This is big news on two fronts. First the Hearthstone has a new owner and he is planning a music schedule which means the burgeoning music scene in Metamora, just got burgeoned some more.

   The second is (in no particular order) Clint Lewis and Hidden Drive. For the past ten years we’ve heard of Clint Lewis’ prowess as a guitar player and songwriter. His sister once told me that when King’s Island was opening they held an audition for a house band and her brother won. She said he didn’t take it for reasons that escape me now.

   Certainly whenever Clint Lewis’s newest CD hits the counter at Pavey’s in Metamora they’re gone. In other words, he has a local following. We heard they drew around 250 revelers to their New Year’s Eve gig at the Long Branch in Laurel.

   The point is Clint Lewis is a local phenom and this Hearthstone show will be a great place to hear his music. It will also be interesting to see where they put the band. The Hearthstone is a big, sprawling place from the 1930s.

   The Hearthstone is or has the possibility of being a first class roadhouse. What do I mean by ‘roadhouse,’ I ask myself. Not a place where there’s a cage around the band so they don’t get hit by the odd flying projectile, but a place people will travel to for a good meal and to catch some entertainment. A regional attraction, not just a local restaurant.

   Remember (or learn if you haven’t heard) a scene in Rain Man was filmed there. Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise acted upon the steps on one of those cottages out back. Why? Because the Hearthstone has honest to goodness Midwestern character.

   Having live music at the Hearthstone will add a lot to the Metamora music scene.

   Catrina Campbell as The Cat and the Fiddle is doing her best to keep Metamora in live music. Last week she hosted Brian Keith Wallen to an overflowing and very appreciative audience. This week it’s ‘An Evening with Kriss and Greg Zeisemer.’

   The Cat and the Fiddle is located on Clayborn Street in downtown Metamora whereas the Hearthstone is on US 52 about a mile east of town. Since both happen this Friday, adventurous music loving souls might find it a treat to catch both the Zeisemer evening entertainment then the late sets of Clint Lewis and Hidden Drive.

 

Resurrection of another kind

   The Olde North Chapel in Richmond is an example of what to do with a church when the congregation permanently vacates (or the doctrine leaders administering the purse strings decide to close its doors for reasons beyond the catholic ken).

   The church has been resurrected as a ‘vintage wedding chapel’ complete with the original stain glass windows, high arching ceilings, red carpets, pews lit by lantern light, a bridal dressing suite and banquet hall.

   The definite omnipresent ecclesiastical ambiance of the chapel itself belies or maybe enhances the secular nature of the supposition that the Olde North Chapel is or seems to be non-denominational.

   The fact that its name is spelled ‘Olde’ with an ‘e’ from a time before America was overrun by Europeans, alerts you to something not exactly historically accurate. The church was built around 1868 when spelling old o-l-d-e in grammar school would have gotten you a whack over the knuckles.

     For those in the Whitewater Valley with a church on their hands which may also need resurrection, this might be lesson. It may also need a new name.

   When you take possession from the original owner they may, for whatever reason, take the original name with them. For a hamlet like St. Mary’s, taking the name from their church, takes the name from their town. In addition, take out ‘St. Mary’s’ from ‘St. Mary’s of the Rock’ and what have you got? A hard place.

   St. Mary’s of the Rock is one of those churches recently abandoned by the Catholic Church. Could it continue to serve the community as a place for weddings? It seems logical, but logic doesn’t always play a part in decision making on a catholic scale.

 

Proactive library services

   What do we need to do? Pay our taxes. When do we need to do it? Like now. And who you gonna turn to for help? How about AARP Tax-Aide volunteers at Morrison-Reeves Library? The library and the volunteers are offering free tax filing service on a first come, first served basis. The best time to get there is on Wednesdays and Thursdays in February from 9:30 am to 3:30 pm.

   And if that’s not enough freebies from Morrisson-Reeves, they are also offering free attorney service on Martin Luther King Day. A group of attorneys called the Whitewater Valley Pro Bono Commission will be giving free 15-20 minute consultations in the Bard Room at Morrisson-Reeves from 4 to 6 pm this coming Monday.

   This service is open to residents of Wayne, Union, Rush, Fayette and Franklin Counties in Indiana. 

Missy Werner Band

6 pm, Friday

Connersville Bluegrass MA


Issue 131

January 7-13, 2014

 

Who needs more holidays?

   There are two choices for holiday excitement in the near future. One is Martin Luther King Day on January 20th, the other is Valentine’s Day on February 14th. St. Valentine’s Day is much older, but Martin Luther King Day is more important since our banks will be closed that day. Not so on Valentine’s Day.

   But economically speaking, and strictly in my opinion, more money is spent on Valentine’s Day than MLK Day. I mean have you ever seen an MLK card on the long racks at your local neighborhood corporate giant? I haven’t and I probably wouldn’t buy one if I did. Not because I don’t love the peace and non-violence which Reverend King lived for. More because I haven’t been trained to need to buy one.

   What used to be called Madison Avenue (read ‘Big Advertising’) needs to first announce the existence of such cards, then convince me I need them to keep up with all the pretty people I see in the TV commercials exchanging cards in meaningful ways.

   Come to think of it, a card that promoted ‘Big Peace’ once a year would be something worth sending around. Sort of ‘Celebrate What He Stood For’ Day. That’d be worth buying into. I know that the good folks at Earlham College would support it.

 

Local Music Scene

   Brian Keith Wallen is one of those guitar player/singing people who jump across genre. He and his band cut some pretty hot bluegrass at Connersville Bluegrass Music Association a few years back. He has won at least one prestigious award for his blues renditions and he’s been seen playing Richmond and other places in the company of a chantreuse of some more than local reknown. But this Saturday at the Cat and Fiddle in Metamora he will performing original material. Well, 75% worth anyway.

   Via Facebook he wrote, “Now, of course, I'll still be doing some favorite covers as well, but instead of being the usual 75% covers and 25% originals, it will be the other way around.

   If you like my original music, and want to support that, it would mean a lot if you could be there.”

   ‘There’ is The Cat & the Fiddle at the Thorpe House in Metamora, a name with more letters than seats in the Cat & Fiddle dining/entertainment room. It’s table seating with a capacity of around 36, if I remember correctly. BKW suggests in large letters, ‘YOU WILL NEED TO MAKE RESERVATIONS. It’s a small venue.’

   It is this Saturday at 5:30 pm and is intentionally designed as a pre-game show so those of us who live in The Gore and may be still licking the wounds on our Bengal claws can prepare properly for the winning team from our western side, the Indianapolis Colts.

   In her invitation Catrina added something both thoughtful and practical during winter, the weather report, 50-36 degrees, chance of rain. She also said dinner and music are designed to be over before the game begins at 8:15 pm. Btw, the Colts face the Patriots at Gillette Stadium in New England somewhere.

   (Can you imagine, -10 on Monday, +50 on Saturday?)

— We need to direct your attention to Connersville for the Bluegrass show this Friday. It’s Missy Werner’s Band which is called Missy Werner Band on their website of the same name. If you visit it you learn their new single “I Always Do” debuted on the Bluegrass Today chart back in November at Number 3. Missy says, “Thanks to all of the DJs who are playing our music and to our fans for requesting it!” That would be you if you make it to the Connersville Bluegrass Music Association on Western Avenue this week.

   Their single ‘I Always Do’ is part of a new album project which will be released early this year, which when you think of it is like now. On their website Missy said the band was going into the studio at the end of November to record the last four songs. “The songwriters have really outdone themselves on these cuts,” she wrote.

   Whether the new album will be available at the CBMA gig Friday evening, we don’t know. But we would expect the music from the album, including “I Always Do’, to be played the best way possible, live and in living Connersville color.

— We’ve heard of early plans being made for a Valentine’s Day dance at the American Legion in Brookville, the place near the town park along the tailwater of the West Fork. From the horse’s mouth we’ve heard they’ve booked the Local Legends Band for the gig.

   Local Legends Band, the horse in question, is made up a former basketball star at Brookville High, a former winning quarterback at Batesville High, a drummer who’s partied with Willie and Waylon and the boys, and their newest, a harmonica playing, lead vocalist who is said to have rounded out the group.

 

Food for wolves in winter

   Our friends at Scenic Road Tours are doing their first good deed for the new year by holding a road tour fundraiser for Wolf Creek Habitat not this Saturday, but next Saturday, January 18. Mark your calendars and rev up your engines. It’s your turn to take a ride on the Canis Lupus Express.

   The Feed the Wolves Fundraiser Road Tour begins at South Decatur High School near Greensburg, Indiana and ends on Wolf Creek Road at the Habitat. “If you like wolves and would like the chance to help a great cause, this event was made for you,” wrote tour guide Satolli Glassmeyer.

   Besides helping to supply wolf food, this is also going to be a covered bridge viewing tour and that might be one reason it begins in covered bridge laden Decatur County.

   Think of the world at zero degrees, think of the hungry wolves. Think of a warm ride with a group of friends and giddyupgo! Call Satolli to register at 812 623-5727.

 

Winter hillsliding

   The place to be this week would be Perfect North Slopes. Who else has winter outdoor entertainment in weather like this? The crazies who slide down hills in various ways and fashions, that’s who. And Perfect North Slopes caters to those crazies who aren’t really crazy at all unless it is about wintertime and the beauty therein and without.

   While some of us would rather be without winter all together, there are those amongst us, probably in our very own families, who love winter best. People who hate a blistering heat of July or August fall into that category. We hope Monday was the seasonal peak of their winter bliss. For the editorial ‘we’, when it comes to winter, warmer is better.

 

 

 

 

Issue 130 

Dec. 31-Jan. 6, 2014

 

Local Music Scene

   We’re voting Genna & Jesse’s performance this Friday at Taffy’s of Eaton as the hottest ticket of the week. And to our best knowledge it’s free.

   Genna & Jesse are reportedly angelic in their pacing, vocals and overall esprit de music or musique, if you like. Taffy’s, the self-proclaimed ‘music mecca of the Universe’ (and who’s to say they’re wrong?), has been raving about Genna & Jesse since they’ve known them.

   Of Genna & Jesse, Taffy’s says, “the outstanding duo from Richmond, California” “captured our hearts.” Taffy’s named them Best New Artist of the Year 2012.

   By the way, it looks like the Knollwood Boys are at the top of the running for Best New Artist of the Year 2013. Considering Taffy’s can host as many as 200 performances in any given year, being the ‘best of’ at Taffy’s ain’t exactly easy as candy, the eating of, not so much the making of.

   Besides their return to Taffy’s on Friday, Genna & Jesse are available at a living room near you. According to their website which you may find by Googling their names, they are part of a network of performers who put on House Concerts.

   The idea is a host puts on the party while the band picks up door, probably with some kind of guarantee. They are definitely private and by invitation only and are a great way to bring a little culture to your particular friends in your neck of the woods.

 

The storefront shuffle in Metamora

   You’d expect Metamora to go into a kind of economic hibernation after Christmas Walk, but you’d be wrong (again). If last Saturday was any example the old canal town is abuzz with changes.

   First of all a box truck was backed up to the door delivering boxes to Annie’s. Annie’s is located in the middle building of the signature three as you drive over the canal on Bridge Street. We learned a second Annie’s store located elsewhere was closing and so it wouldn’t be too much to say Annie’s store in Metamora is receiving an inventory injection.

   Next to Annie’s on your right (stage right) is the building the local Masons own. The plaque on the front of the building calls your attention to the original cobalt blue windows on the second floor where the Masons hold their meetings. You’ll notice, those are not see-through windows, at least not from the outside. It might be different from the inside. The Masons may see Metamora as cobalt blue.

   Anyway, Kaliedosaurus, the children’s book and toy store, is taking over the store front on the corner. That location has to be among the primest of the prime traffic areas in the historic district. Kaliedosaurus Books and Toys was most recently located in a coop shop in Duck Creek Crossing. According to Kaliedosaurus proprietor Janice Hunsche, the relocation will be slow going but somewhat continuous throughout January and February.

   As far as those Metamora merchants who stay open all winter are concerned, any signs of life in winter are welcome signs of life.

   Another move will be going on in the third building of that signature three. For as long as we’ve been in Metamora, George and Gail Ginther’s Words and Images/The Train Place has/have occupied the storefront there next to the old Martindale Hotel. Now, they, too/two, are moving.

   The Old Fashioned Candy Store, the building famous for being slightly tilted from construction, will now be Words and Images and the adjacent add-on which is part of the same building will be The Train Place. Both will have their own entrances but are open to each other in the back so the traffic can flow from one to the next indoors.

   There is no word yet on who might be taking over the present/former location of Words and Images/The Train Place. Perhaps no one knows it will soon be available … well, present company excepted.

 

Our days of holiday exhaust

   To say there’s not much going on once New Year’s Eve has come and gone will come as no surprise to anyone over 21. It seems we are entering the great annual holiday vacuum where all the wonderful things we’ve had the opportunity to participate in since Thanksgiving (or was it Halloween?) have socially exhausted us and we want nothing more than to lull about under our comforters and try not to think about much of anything.

   But here at the Whitewater Valley Guide we fight against such notions. We go looking for things to do and judging by the short calendar this week, there just ain’t much going on from Hagerstown to North Bend, Aurora to New Paris, in other words, in our neck of the woods.

   Nightlife continues in the nightclubs, taverns, bars and restaurants, but not so much in the usual social circles neither daily nor nightly. Morrison-Reeves, Richmond’s usually active library, is closed for the holidays until January 4th when the Yarn Lovers Club will meet at 10 am to darn and yarn.

   It’s understandable. No one would dare to plan a theatre opening or symphony between now and say Three Kings Day when the Christmas season is officially over, at least according to the good people of the Virgin Islands who like to follow old English tradition in the matter of celebrating Christmas.

   In the islands you may call on any home you suspect of having a demijohn of guavaberry and simply sing, “Good mawnin’, Good mawnin’. I come for me guavaberry!” and you will be welcome up to and including Three Kings Day. After that, the jug disappears for another year and guests will have to be satisfied with other refreshments.

   January 6th, Three Kings Day, has many names. On the Catholic calendar, it is Epiphany or Theophany. The original epiphany was that this boy child Jesus Christ was the Son of God. This message was revealed through the Three Kings to the Gentiles, according to dated sources.

   The Church of England calls it the Twelfth Night since January 6th is twelve days from Christmas. And to those same followers the following Monday is something called Plough Monday.

   This year since Three Kings Day falls on a Monday it is necessary to shift it over one day to Plough Tuesday. Otherwise if we waited for the next Monday to be Plough Monday, we’d have another week of extended holidaying to do. Judging by our social calendar this week, we’re just not ready for that.

   We interpret Plough Monday and/or Tuesday to mean — time again to strap on the plough. We highly encourage the world at large and the Whitewater Valley in particular to celebrate Plough Monday/Tuesday by doing just that, heeding of course whatever was learned during the Epiphany or Theophany on Three Kings Day.

   Just to remind you, Epiphany is a ‘striking appearance’ or ‘manifestation’ while Theophany means ‘vision of God’. We encourage you to put them together on January 6th under whatever name and give 2014 a chance to begin with a real blessing.

   Personally, we are hoping for a sighting of our favorite Theophany, Tecumseh.


Happy New Year!


Gary August Schlueter

 

 

 

 

 

 

The cross atop 'Mt. Metamora' mysteriously illuminates when the slanting winter sun

 is in the western sky. 

Here an equally lighted cloud to the left seems to point it out to passersby on US 52.

GASPix©2013 

 

Issue 129 

 

Local Music Scene – New Year’s Eve Parties and Dances

   The Dallas Moore Band, a musical stalwart of the Whitewater Valley, comes off playing Firehouse BBQ and Blues in Richmond last Saturday to headline the New Year’s Eve festivities at the Knights of Columbus hall in Brookville on, you guessed it, New Year’s Eve.

   Four blocks up Main Street the Local Legends perform from 10 until 2, their usual hours, in the Eagles Club Room, an unusual place for them. The Local Legends have been playing their way down (or up) Main Street.

   They were regulars in an irregular sort of way at the Midtown Café, established in 1948 btw which makes it like Mousie’s in Connersville (where they don’t have live music) a Baby Boomer. The Local Legends were also the first band to play at Cougar’s, the newest night-spot in Brookville and, like the Midtown and the Eagles Club Room, also on Main.

   The Batesville Eagles, not to be confused with the Brookville Eagles, is featuring Matrix Band on New Year’s Eve. The Matrix Band occasionally plays Randy’s Roadhouse.

   Randy’s Roadhouse, tucked in the northeast corner of the newly refurbished Batesville parking lot/community center, wins the award for the best-named New Year’s Eve band. And the winner is, considering it is a new year and all, The Next Episode!

   Firehouse BBQ is firing off a double barrel shotgun this new year’s eve, which we will establish later is not new year at all (and considering it happens at midnight, wouldn’t by any state of normality be considered—in any way, shape or form—an evening, of which an eve should and must be derived.)

   Other than that scatter shot, Firehouse has two of Richmond’s favorites (if number of gigs per year is any criterion) Doug Hart (and Band) and Sean Lamb (and equally Band).

   Homebrew Hollars headlines Taffy’s of Eaton ($45-champagne toast included). With that rather rich door charge, Taffy’s offers a free drive home in like a ten-mile circle.

   90 Proof Twang holds forth in Reily at that old hog hostelry, Indian Creek Tavern. Hogs are still welcome there, btw.

 

Welcome to the real New Year

   We’re adding one day to the Whitewater Valley Guide calendar this week. Yes, it’s like magic. You get eight days for the price of seven. And that extra day is none other than New Year’s Eve! Hip, hip, hurray and listen to the sigh of relief of all those people who’ve somehow lived through the last year with triskaidekaphobia, an abnormal fear of the number 13.

   Actually for those stricken the worst amongst us, heed not the impending gloom of the shortening number of days between this sweet Christmas Eve and the end of this dismal year ending in 13. I say ‘heed not’ because the end is already over. It happened on December 21 with the rising waters and swiftly changing temperatures.

   The year changed on December 21 and though newly born is now in this prenatal stage where we are actually living in the new year 2014 but before it is born, at least by our Julian Calendar.

   The real new year began with the days growing longer after the Winter Solstice which no one seems to celebrate much anymore. There was a time though, a time lasting a lot longer than the 200 years or so of our mechanical/industrial/electrical/nuclear age when we, the Great We who make up all that humans down say 10,000 years, did revere that day when the Light began its ascendance again.

   While you triskaidekaphobiens may have an ingrained feeling that some terrible thing must happen before the end of the year because it hasn’t really happened yet (at least not to you) and it is 2013, for goodness sake, I declare 2013 officially over!

   Welcome to the real New Year.

 

Odd Lots

   If you really want to submerge yourself in college basketball, both men’s and women’s, take an outing to Millet Hall on Miami’s Oxford campus this Sunday. The female of the Redhawk species play hoops with Cleveland State while the male Redhawkers take on Southern Illinois. The approximate two-hour games start at 1 pm, so bring a picnic basket if you intend to make a day of it.

   We noticed a poster in the window of Twice Blessed (highly recommended, btw) in Batesville which was gathering folks to protest the possible advance of the Walmart culture into the not exactly unsuspecting Batesville business community.

   On Friday the WRBI website poll was running 51/49 in favor of Walmart coming to Batesville. There were about 250 votes. If you want your voice heard, try http://www.wrbiradio.com.

   The Taft Museum of Art is not in the Whitewater Valley. It is located in downtown Cincinnati. It is a jewel by any standard. There are works there worth visiting over and over again. Some are even compelling which is what an art museum collection should be, something so beautiful, mysterious, crafty or artificial it makes you come back.

   The Harrison Press reports a Crosby man, Doug Lohman, the owner of Minges Greenhouse in Harrison, has his collection of Christmas decorations dating back 130 years or so, on display at the Taft. Lohman, himself, has been collecting Christmas ornaments for 30 years and was “pleased” to be chosen.

  

Issue 128 

December 17-23, 2013

 

New TV program puts the redo on Veach’s

    There are plenty of Christmas attractions vying for our attention from north to south in the Whitewater Valley this last week before the namesake of the season is upon us, but if you have kids Veach’s Toy Station in Richmond would be worth a pilgrimage this Saturday. Santa Claus is coming to a newly made over Veach’s, a makeover compliments of the Today Show television crew which buzzed through a few weeks ago.

    To see what the TV crew captured on tape, you will have to wait until February when The Marketing Makeover segment debuts on NBC’s Today Show, but to witness the makeover, come to the store this Saturday afternoon.

    We are told Marketing Makeover honcho Martin Linstrom is an author, adviser and branding guru, and, perhaps, self-branding guru. The holy he (he and his team combined) will “guide changes to both the physical appearance and the business strategies of Veach’s Toy Station.”

    “To be connected with him is just the chance of a lifetime,” store co-owner Shari Veach said.

    While the show will air in February, the changes guided by The Marketing Makeover will be part of our cumulative community experience for years to come. Let’s hope the experience lights a fire under other retailers in need of their own makeover.

  

Local Music Scene

    We like to study our weekly calendar for trends in the Valley entertainment. One thing we can say by comparing the past two years with the fall season of 2013, we haven’t had the big names we usually get at either Earlham College or Miami University. This could be a fluke or it could be the sign of something bigger. But we look forward to the spring quarter when we expect the fluke to unfluke itself.

    I wouldn’t call doing pop standards a trend, but for the three years we’ve been watching the entertainment scene in the Whitewater Valley we have only seen one crooner who performs pop standards. That’s Bob LeRoy, whose name if he lived in New Orleans would be Bobby LeRoy.

    Pop standards are one term for the music that came from Tin Pan Alley and places like that, song factories where teams of creators pumped out tunes like ‘A Sunday Kind of Love,’ ‘The Folks Who Live on the Hill,’ ‘I Remember April,’ ‘Moonlight in Vermont,’ and much more. These are jazz chord based songs and use something other than 4/4 time to keep the beat.

    That Bob LeRoy is keeping them alive is reason to give him and the Harrison VFW a shout out, since Crooner Bob will be performing ‘Pop Standards’ there this Friday night.

 

Winding down the season

    Christmas in Metamora is winding down with only one more weekend for Christmas Walk. And when the winding-down is done the season ends for both the Metamora Grist Mill and the Whitewater Railroad, at least for their weekly trips to Metamora.

    It’s been a hard season weatherwise for Christmas Walk. The storm a few Fridays ago knocked out most travel for that weekend and last weekend we again had winter warning threats which tend to keep people close to home.

    The forecast for this coming weekend is more like spring than winter with temps reaching into the 50s and 60s and lots of rain and haze. It may not be great weather for Christmas shopping but it is fine weather for riding a train over the river and through the woods.

 

Farm fresh

    The weekend warm-up may not put you in the Christmas spirit but the hint of spring might make you think of the growing season, and that should remind you that Oxford Farmers Market is operating under its winter hours for one more weekend. It will be open from 10 am to noon this Saturday and besides handmade wreaths there will be hydroponic lettuce, hearty squash, kale, potatoes and root crops, plus organic chicken, eggs, pork and sausage.

 

Remember When?

    If you lived in the southern part of the Valley through most of the 20th Century you’d be very old right now. You would also remember the Studebaker and the Studebaker dealership on Oberding Road (US 50) near Greendale. You’d have to remember it, because not only is the Studebaker gone now, so is the old dealership and the building that housed it.

    Satolli Glassmeyer of Scenic Road Rallies out of Sunman has made it his mission to document with photographs as many threatened historic structures as he can, and starting this week he will be sharing them with us. Here’s his report:

     “Built in the early 1900's, after the dealership closed in the 1950s, it was transformed into the Oberding Garage for general automobile repair.  The shop stayed in business until the 1970s when it was finally closed.

     It was then used for storage up until 2010.  After a hard winter with heavy snowfall it was discovered in March of 2010 that the back wall had bowed out to the extent that the building was in danger of collapsing. 

    The owner of the structure decided at that point to demolish the building rather than repair the structure. In April 2010 the building was leveled and another piece of Dearborn County history faded away forever.

    This picture was taken just two months before the demolition." 

 

Keeping our history alive

    We can’t keep letting the historic character of our Valley fall away hither, thither and yon. That character is made up of every barn, every house, every building, every work of our ancestors which stands today as a reminder of who we were and what we stood for.   And they are falling away. I don’t know if it’s an alarming rate but it is steady, irrefutable and irresistible, that is unless we do resist. And how do we do that, you might ask?

    The honest answer is, Who knows?

    In an ideal world, there would be some kind of incentive to keep a building alive and part of our historic character, but this is not an ideal world. As Yeats wrote, “Things fall apart/the center will not hold/mere anarchy is loosed upon the world” and old buildings fall down. (This last part might have been edited out of most anthology editions.)

    I’m reminded of an old pioneer barn on Whistle Creek Road in Franklin County. The wood is hand-hewn from virgin timber dating back to the days before the canal was built. The roof beam has collapsed and every year the structure sighs, slowly sinking down, gradually taking the entire barn with it to the ground.

    In spring we drove past while the owner was sitting on the porch of his house which was built around the same time but restored to be both functional and beautiful.

    We asked him about the barn and he said it was too expensive to restore and there was nothing he could do but watch it gradually fall which, with the help of a beverage, was exactly what he was doing when we met that April morning.

    So there’s the essence of the problem. Here’s an owner who knows about restoration, has taken an active role in it, and would like to keep his barn up, but can’t because of money, that old bug-a-boo, money.

    So maybe that’s what Who knows. We did agree earlier that Who knows, didn’t we? It takes money to save old buildings and where is that money to come from, oh all-knowing Who?

    Who does not answer, but I will. It comes from us and from those we can lure here to see this historic fabric we so lovingly sustain. Every year we keep our historic character more or less intact is another year we put ourselves more or less ahead of the crowd of other regions in the Old Northwest.

    It’s like that old joke: Two men are hiking in the jungle when a hungry lion begins to chase them. One stops to put on his running shoes. The other shouts back, “You can’t outrun a lion.” The other, all laced up and moving forward, says, “I don’t have to. I only have to outrun you.” 

 

Christmas energy release

   Last Christmas we received a very generous donation from a Whitewater Valley Guide subscriber. It was a wonderful surprise at the time but since then we see this check as symbolic. It stands for the untapped need you have to show your support for the Guide.  

   Never one to hold things back or to dam things in general, we remind you, you may release all that pent up energy by sending us a donation of your own.

   Send checks in any amount made out to Gary Schlueter/PO Box 25/Metamora, In/47030. If you’d like to donate via credit card, Click Here, hit the Pay Pal button and follow the prompts. One thing about PayPal though it only takes donations in $20 increments.

   Thank you and Merry Christmas!

Reily Historical Society Museum

Photo thanks to Sandy Campbell


Issue 127 

December 10-16, 2013

 

Centerville Christmas offerings

   If you are either a Jane Austen or a Christmas fan, Centerville could keep you occupied this Saturday. Your Jane Austen op comes with the periodic Jane Austen Movie Series which screens at two this Saturday afternoon in the Centerville Public Library.

   Unlike watching a Jane Austen movie alone or with unenlightened family members, here you actually have the opportunity to interact with your fellow Austen-lovers.

   The film screens from two until four, then at 5 pm the Centerville Library will be hosting its Christmas party which will include a number of local authors signing their books. Like we said last week, a local book signed by the author would make a great stocking stuffer, unless the book is a coffee table edition then the stocking may be a little small.

 

A quartet of Christmas Carol performances

   As we should all know by now ‘A Christmas Carol’ unscrews the ultra-conservative Scrooge and turns him into a liberal, human-loving philanthropist, which, of course, saves his soul. In an effort to duplicate that holiday miracle, the Dickens favorite will be performed four times this weekend near the north pole, that is the north pole of the Whitewater Valley, aka Centerville.

   On that happy and auspicious day Friday the 13th, ‘A Christmas Carol’ will be performed back-to-back, if you can believe that, at Centerville Christian Church at 5 pm and again at 7:30 pm. We are told this is a family-friendly version, slightly abridged from the original which could (and should) scare the bejeebies out of little kids.

   Then on Sunday at the Central United Methodist Church in Richmond you will have a chance to see ‘A Christmas Carol’ at 2 pm and again at 4:30 pm. If you’ve been counting, that makes four.

   Now here comes the miraculous part, the cost of putting on the performances has been covered by an unnamed conglomeration best known at this time of the year as Santa Claus. And that means, all the funds raised by the $10 admission charge will go directly to Hope House and the good work they do helping men recover from alcohol and drug abuse as well as homelessness.

   So, by going to see any of these performances you will be donating to a cause even the newly re-minted Ebenezer Scrooge would praise.

 

Local Music Scene

   The only listing of a Nutcracker performance so far this season in the Whitewater Valley is coming up this Saturday at Lew Wallace Auditorium, Franklin County High School, Brookville. The Nutcracker will be performed by the Anna Von Oettingen Ballet Corps and is one night only at bargain rates. Would you believe eight bucks for adults and $4 for the rest of us.

   Tony Holt and the Wildwood Boys got weathered out of their gig last Friday at the Connersville Bluegrass Music Association, but there is another chance to hear this great Whitewater Valley group this Saturday at the Milan VFW Hall. The program is called Bluegrass Christmas which makes for an interesting song list. How many Bluegrass Christmas songs can you name?

 

Historical Societies sprouting museums

   Last Saturday the Harrison Village Historical Society Museum officially opened with a ribbon cutting and the whole works. It is located at 115 North Walnut one block off Harrison Avenue aka Old US 52. The holiday theme during their first go-round is Toys from Grandma’s Attic.

   (If you can help with contact info, hours, etc. email me garyaschlueter@gmail.com.)

   Speaking of museum openings, Reily Historical Society Museum held its holiday open house on the first Sunday of December. That’s the key to remember when it comes to visiting Reily for its history, Reily Historical Society Museum is open the first Sunday of each month from 1 to 4 pm.

   A local patron brought over a sled which was set up on the front lawn of the museum and Santa Claus made his appearance.

   Sandy Campbell runs the website for the Museum as well as Indian Creek Tavern which is across the road. Find one, you find the other, and if you find Reily, you find Indian Creek Tavern and the Museum.

   But if you are determined to do it digitally, there are some interesting facts and factoids at www.reilyhistory.net. Sandy reports “We have some very old and interesting things and are constantly getting in more everyday from the members and the community.”

   On the site we read, “The last bear seen in Reily Township was in the northeast corner of section six in 1809. In 1815 Brumfield Boone killed one of the largest panthers ever seen in Butler County on a farm then owner by John Boone, his father. The animal measured seven feet from tip to tip. People came from all directions to see it and its skin was kept a good while in the neighborhood.”

   To complete our Ohio Historical Society trifecta, Gustave Tafel’s The Cincinnati Germans in the Civil War is the basis of a PowerPoint presentation by Dr. Don Heinrich Tolzmann. Dr. Don is president of the German-American Citizens League, Curator of the German Heritage Museum and Historian of the Roebling Suspension Bridge Committee in Cincinnati. He will speak to the Morgan Township Historical Society this Saturday, 10 am in the Administration Building, 3141 Chapel Road, Okeana, Ohio.

 

RAMp up to the Plastic Phantastic Phantoscope Film Festival

   A Richmond Art Museum film festival is movin’ on up to the big time, if Indianapolis is the big time. RAM’s eighth annual Phantoscope High School Film Festival will be held at Indiana State Museum next year, May second to be exact. (Consult your calendar for the proper year if necessary.)

     Richmond bred and educated, C. Francis Jenkins “created the first projection device which he called a Phantoscope,” according to a release we received Dec. 3 from Lance M. Crow, education direction of RAM.

   Phantoscope Film Festival will be “highlighting the talents of our young filmmakers, and giving them a chance to screen films in front of a live audience on the big screen is a unique and important aspect of Phantoscope,” Lance wrote.

   Another aspect of some import is the $1,000 cash prize for best film. Prizes will also be awarded for a list of bests: cinematography, screenplay, editing, and documentary.

   Final deadline for submission is March 1, 2014. So if you’re thinking of taking RAM up on this phantastic Phantoscope Film Festival. Click here for the entry form.

http://www.richmondartmuseum.org/film/documents/callforentries2014version3.pdf

 

Jenkins was a great man

   C. Francis Jenkins was born in Dayton and grew up in Richmond. His alma mater is Earlham College which later awarded him an honorary doctor of science degree. It was his projector, the Phantoscope, which Thomas Edison used in the first public showings of motion pictures for admission. It’s not too much to say, the Phantoscpope was a cornerstone of the film industry as we know it today.

   He was also a television engineering pioneer. His company Jenkins Television Corporation opened the first broadcast television station in the United States in 1928. It went belly-up four long Depression years later.

   He is recognized by his peers during the Emmy Awards when The Charles F. Jenkins Lifetime Achievement Award is given to a special engineer who made significant contributions to television technology and engineering over his or her career.

   He also founded the Society of Motion Picture Engineers. From which we conclude, he was a great man, and he was shaped by Richmond and Earlham College.

 

 

  

 

 

Gaya's ethereal breast

GASPix©2013


Issue 126 

December 3-9, 2013

 

Holiday is the highlight

   You’d expect Christmas and the Holiday Season to top the charts when it comes to stuff on the calendar this week. So don’t be surprised.

   A couple of the holiday highlights from Saturday tie together nicely in Richmond with the Holiday Dreams Parade carousing down East Main across the main north-south corridors through town at 4 o’clock and the Celebration of Lights beginning at Glen Miller Park 12 blocks (or so) east two hours later.

   The Celebration lights up at 6 pm, so you might practice the slow stroll down part of Richmond’s part of the National Road from the parade, but I’d recommend a slow, early supper at one of Richmond’s many fine restaurants and cafes.

 

Local book holiday gifts

 A fine gift is one that gives joy when it is given. An even finer gift is one that not only gives joy when given, but increase in value. We can’t be sure that a new book signed by the author will do either but if it’s worth a try to you, get to Metamora this Sunday between 2 and 4 pm.

   Local author Valerie Woebkenberg will be at Keleidosaurus Books in Duck Creek Crossing signing both hard copy and soft cover copies of her book The Story the Little Christmas Tree Told. As the name implies, it is the adventure of a little pine tree and was adapted from a short story written in 1923 by Alice Manley, a lifelong resident of Laurel, Indiana.

   And speaking of local books, we got an email from Donna Cronk, newsgirl/editor at the Courier-Times in New Castle. She reports she is a Union County native and “have just written a fictional novel inspired by Liberty.” She expects it out in “late winter 2014” which we read as March. So look for another local book signing/investment op by the Ides of March.

 

Doll Tea in a museum

   This Saturday you can get all dolled up at the Wayne County Historical Museum where you are encouraged to bring your favorite doll to tea. While this sounds like a very civilized date, the doll you’d be bringing is the collectible kind. The conversation will center on dolls and doll collecting and there will be a silent auction of several ‘original’ mini-American Girl Dolls.

   Guests will arrive at noon and the museum will be decorated throughout with table top trees, wreaths, and gift baskets, all available in silent auction format. We are told, “Bidders are encouraged to return several times to bid on their favorites. Return trips are free admission with bidder card.”

 

Living the season

   Live Nativity for Christmas is a fine thing to behold. Smyra Missionary Baptist Church in New Trenton holds their’s this Friday at 6 pm. A half hour later the Live Nativity is displayed at the Brookville Library.

 

 

Local Music Scene

   Feel in the mood for some real good Bluegrass? Check out www.wildwoodvalleyboys.net.

   Once the site comes up the music begins but instead of playing an entire song, you get a good taste of four or five by Tony Holt and the Wildwood Valley Boys. One thing all the songs have in common is, you want to hear more, and you can this Friday at the Connersville Bluegrass Music Association on Western Avenue.

   The group’s first four gigs next year are in Ohio, Virginia, Kentucky and Oklahoma. Then in June they play Bean Blossom at the Bill Monroe Music Park. In other words, they are sought after and, this week only, easy to find.

— Free music is always a treat and free jazz is even better. This Saturday’s Jazz and Percussion Jam in Goddard Auditorium, Earlham College, National Road West, Richmond, is a great way to step out of the holiday tape loop.

 

Road Rally in Dearborn County

   Saturday looks to be bright and cold. Great weather to explore. This week we can line you up with two opportunities to explore our beautiful and flexible Whitewater Valley, one by car and one by armchair or whatever chair we’re assuming is under you when you read this.

   First Satolli Glassmeyer is hosting a road rally through northern Dearborn County this Saturday. He writes, “The northern part of Dearborn County is filled with one room school houses, former black smith shops, historic churches, ghost roads, phantom bridges and the one and only Pepsi-Cola barn!”

   The tour begins and ends in St. Leon. Pre-register at 812 623-5727.

   The second opportunity begins:

 

Driving Tour of Ripley County-1

   You know how we like to get a long running start on our holidays these days? Well, here it is December and the Whitewater Valley Guide is already starting its Black History Month program. February will be on us before we know it and when it gets here we want to be ready to hold up our end of the conservation.

   Our focus is on the Underground Railroad in southern parts of the Whitewater Valley. Specifically, we want to feature five driving tours, themselves already featured in the Ripley County Tourism Booklet aptly titled, ‘5 Driving Tours.’

   All five tours start at the Ripley County Historical Society Archives Building on Courthouse Square in Versailles. This is also where you can pick up the booklet which contains a fold out map. You may also purchase a DVD of the driving tours for $10 at the same location. Call them for arrangements 812 689-7431.

   Travel US 421 south to where SR 129 cuts off left, not far up. Six miles south is the site of the old Olean German settlement where immigrant Charles F. Steyer “took an active part in the Underground Railroad activities in Olean and Benham.” The historic farmsted was torn down in 2001.

   About a mile south of that on SR 129 you come to Raccoon Creek where you’ll find Tour Stops #3 & #4, the (Weakman) Pleasant Hill Cemetery and the Free Church which was part of the Raccoon Creek Free Black Community. This church was purchased by the Methodists after the Civil War. They moved it to its present location at CR 450S and US 421. It was renamed Pleasant View Methodist Episcopal Church and is Tour Stop #10 on Trial 1.

   The booklet tells us “the most famous local conductor was Dunk McDowell who lived in the deep woods near Bethel Hole.” Imagine, the stereotype loner living in the woods, antisocial, unkempt, angry and outlawish. But here’s Duncan McDowell somehow in touch with the outside world and caring enough, passionate enough to come out of the woods and conduct soon to be free blacks along a specific link in the Underground Railroad.

   Travel a mile south to Cross Plains and make a right on CR 900. There are no trail stops in Cross Plains but maybe there should be. The booklet tells the story of a white teenager from Cross Plains who blackened his face and let the local pro-slavery people on a wild goose chase. (Talk about an event to hang a local pageant on . . . .)

   The oldest fugitive slave trail which came through Cross Plains from Canaan was maintained by the Separate Baptists of Rev. Alexander Sebestian. Tour Stop #5 on SR 900 marks the site of Squire Paugh’s old mill which was a safe house for this Separate Baptist section of the Underground Railroad.

   Tour Stop #6 tells the story of Edward McGuiness who brought his slaves up from Kentucky in 1817 and freed them. It is this side of Haney Corner a few miles up 900.

   From the booklet we learn that the diabolical Indiana Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 “required federal marshals and local authorities to help slave owners regain their runaway slaves.” (It also made it mandatory for free blacks to register every year at the county seat and would not allow people of color into Indiana. It was responsible for entire agricultural communities of blacks moving away, many times leaving only their cemeteries behind.)

   Tour Stop #7 takes you to Sylvan Grove which was engulfed by the former Jefferson Proving Grounds, now Big Oaks Wildlife Refuge. Sylvan Grove was the estate of the Honorable James Cravens, an anti-slavery lawyer in Indiana. We are warned visiting the property could be dangerous because of all the unexploded ordinance left behind by the US military in their haste. To get where we do not know.

   Rexville is Tour Stop #8 on CR 800W and was the home of the Knights of the Golden Circle, a group who targeted free blacks and abolitionists for harassment and probably worse.

   Continuing left or north on US 421 about 2 ½ miles, turn right on CR 450S to Samm’s Schoolhouse where arms and ammunition were found hidden after the Civil War. Local speculation is that the arms were put there by the Knights of the Golden Circle in preparation for the Confederate victory which never came, at least not to date.

   Go back across US 421 to Tour Stop #10, the aforementioned Pleasant View Church, then back north on 421 to Versailles where the tour ends and the world begins anew.

   Like a good driving tour, history allows us to contemplate in layers, and you can quote me on that.

 

Also noted in Green

   Green Umbrella is holding six first round meetings at different locations throughout our region. Two of them are within the Whitewater Valley itself. Next one is tomorrow, Wednesday, 6 pm at East Central High in St. Leon.

   The Butler County Green Umbrella first round session is December 10 from 6 to 8 pm at Hamilton City Hall.

   The object of this Regional Sustainability Alliance’s effort is to focus a lot of otherwise unconnected groups involved in trials, the creation, care and maintenance thereof, on the bigger picture. The bigger picture is a comprehensive vision for trails in the area under the Green Umbrella.

   We expect since this is the first round, the ideas and directions gathered from these sessions will get amalgamated into fodder for the second round. And so on until perfection is reached. Perfection in this effort would be bicycling to Cincinnati and beyond from Metamora without riding on a public road.

   The area map provided looks like the coverage area of any of your garden variety Cincinnati television stations. Counties in the Valley include Franklin and Dearborn in Indiana and Butler and Hamilton in Ohio. There are two counties in Kentucky, two in Indiana and four in Ohio under the Green Umbrella.

 

 

 

Salter's Sunset

reflection of Mt. Metamora off the hood 

2013©John Salter


Issue 125 

 

Deck the Halls

   Parents with creative kids and who are fast on their feet could start a holiday tradition this afternoon at Brookville and Laurel Libraries. The annual Deck the Halls program happens simultaneously at both libraries from 3 to 7 pm today, like right now.

   Your kids will leave with an ornament they have made. And since the program runs for the next three Tuesdays (same time, same stations) Deck the Halls will provide one kid with enough ornaments to cover a quarter section of the family Christmas tree. Where that quarter faces depends on forces out of our control.


Local Music Scene

   We want to thank Randy’s Roadhouse in Batesville for keeping alive the relatively new concept Thanksgiving Eve. It’s a holiday celebration waiting to happen. A few years back in the Whitewater Valley we hit a lively streak where you could have moved from Brookville all the way to Lawrenceburg stopping off at Thanksgiving Eve events at several spots along the way.

   Last year, Thanksgiving Eve slipped past us with nary a mention. This year it appears again but only in one place Randy’s Roadhouse. Consequently we recommend a pile on at Randy’s where we may dance to The Next Episode until we’re sure we’ve made enough room for the feast on the morrow.

   Besides Wednesday night at Randy’s, there’ll be good music on Black Friday at the Cat and the Fiddle. Dean Phelps and Brian Keith Wallen are getting together again which is always something to see and even more to hear. They form the core of a floating group of musicians who’ve appeared under various names at venues around the Valley.

   This Friday evening they’ll be mixing and matching with Rick and Holly Garrett who first appeared in Metamora as Patchwork on the big stage at the Music Festival. Rick and Holly love Metamora so much they were married here, on the trail actually with the permission of Whitewater Canal Trail, Inc.

   Since Rick is also a stand-up comic, you can expect some laughs with your good music and Catrina’s good cooking.

 

Joint holiday concert

   On the first day of Christmas the RCO gave to me, a free concert in a pear tree, if and only if Goddard Auditorium is also a pear tree. And another thing, can we call December 1st the first day of Christmas? Well, if an auditorium can be a pear tree, why the heck not?

   This free concert at 3:30 features the Eaton Area Community Chorus under the direction of Jay Conard. It is the annual joint holiday concert of these two groups who reach across state lines to embrace in music through songs of joy and peace on Earth.

Carpenter Hall where you’ll find Goddard Auditorium is on the Richmond campus of Earlham College.

 

Gaar House holiday twists

    Maybe it’s much too early in the game. Ah, but I thought I’d ask you just the same: What’re ya doin’ next Fourth of July?

    It looks like Gaar House and Richmond Symphony Orchestra plus friends and relatives are gearing up for another sensational, if the first one was evidence, way and place to spend the Fourth.

    Imagine yourself blanket sprawled on a posh lawn sipping something that tingles, listening to Beethoven, looking down on the backs of birds flying and up at the red glare of rockets launched from Glenn Miller Park below.

    Tickets went crazy last year, so you might think about reserving now. For those on your list with patience, a pair of tickets would make a good Christmas present.

    And speaking of Christmas present, oh how we love the odd twists of the young holidays. Gaar House is bringing noted ‘after-life archaeologist’ to the mansion on the hill. Through the years visitors have asked is the Gaar House haunted. Until now the answer had been, Who knows? For the stout of heart and those braced with holiday cheer, you could be the first to find out definitively.

    Anthony Truitt, the famed investigator of the paranormal, will be testing the house on three different tours at 6, 7 and 8 pm, Saturday, December 14th. Each 45-minute tour will, of course, contain different people and therefore each tour will have its own energy as it travels through the holiday decorated, three-story, tower-topped Victorian home. Because of this, Anthony stresses he can not know what may occur.

    As in year’s past, the Gaar House & Farm Museum will be highly dressed for the holidays and with yet another holiday twist, many of the decorations may be purchased with the proceeds going to the Gaar Foundation for the upkeep of the house. The decorations are by Cathy Brunner of Jack Daggy Floral.

    Tours of the holiday Gaar House (19 and older $5, 18 and younger $2) will also include a pass by some of Rebecca’s Creative Designs. Rebecca is Becky Cranor. She can help you with updated touches to your family heirlooms which will answer the question, what to do with Grannie’s doilies and things. She will also have her own unique heirloom creations like beautiful one-of-a-kind purses.

    The Gaar House & Farm Museum will be open on four Sundays in December, the 1st, 8th, 15th and the 22nd with guided tours at 1, 2, 3, & 4 pm. The tours take about 45 minutes. It is located at 2593 Pleasant View Road in Richmond. 

    To reserve for the Fourth or for the Christmas house-haunting investigation call 765-966-1262. Visit www.thegaarhouse.com

 

Counting sparrows

 Here’s a heads-up for birders from Joe Robb. Big Oaks NWR Annual Bird Count is happening Saturday, Dec 14, 2013 at where else but the Big Oaks National Wildlife Reserve north of Madison, Indiana. Big Oaks is designated as a Globally Important Bird Area.

   The message continues, ‘Volunteers are needed for all-day or half-day counts at the Big Oaks National Wildlife Reserve. Dress warm and be ready to count birds by 8am!’ Notice the exclamation mark.

   Browse www.bigoaks.org for a digital overview. It is a product of Big Oaks Conservation Society, but digital-smidgital. Hands on, feet on the ground, nose in the air has got to be the best way to get to know Big Oaks and Big Oaks is worth getting to know for outdoor folk in the Whitewater Valley.

   It’s a 50,000 acre nature preserve. There are large grasslands where the male Henslow sparrow gather at times to sing together and sometimes in competition. Big Oaks hosts school groups from elementary to graduate school.

   Email Joe Robb at joe_robb@fws.gov to register. Contact the Refuge office at (812) 273-0783.

 

Classifieds

   You will notice as you read the calendar this week there appears a classified ad, specifically a goat for sale. We’ve never done this before and only have the one so we decided to drop it into the calendar where you’d be sure to read it. You do read the calendar every week, don’t you? As I’ve said before, over time patterns begin to appear and you are made wiser simply for exercising your discipline by reading week after week.

   If as I very well doubt there is suddenly a trickle of people who want to list their items for sale in the Whitewater Valley Guide, who am I to stop them? For a consideration yet to be determined, I will tuck your hand-written classified away in the calendar of the week. Should the trickle become a flood, we will create a Classified section and become rich beyond our wildest dreams, which obviously aren’t very wild.

   Cost of a classified? How about $5 per week for five lines (lines not to exceed 45 characters each) with a minimum of a four week run because PayPal takes payments in $20 increments.

   Let this be the last experiment with Trickle Down Theory in the United States of Indiana and Ohio.

   Email classifieds or classified inquiries to whitewater.valley.guide@gmail.com.


In this is my freedom

 

We have been bitten by a snake as we slept

The bite has awakened us to the fact it was a dream

There is no snake.

There is no bite.

It awoke us — but to what?

Everywhere there is turbulence

as it always has been on Earth.

The truth is, everywhere we go Earth tumbles on.

Yet amidst this tumble and turbulence

there is the wisdom of a goldfish in a pond:

Acceptance.

It is our world.

It is our pond.

It is our point of view —

Quality not quantity is the basis of reality.

How well, not how much, is what matters.

 

Radiating light up from the pond

like the bellow of a bullfrog

I ascribe infinite importance to

my hand upon the plow

my heart to my neighbor

my will to the Impulse of my being.

 

In this is my freedom, my reality, my infinity.

 

Gary August Schlueter

Cave Mountain in a cave

 

Local Music Scene

   The mandolin player in Cave Mountain commented on Saturday night at the Bluegrass show in Metamora’s old blacksmith shop that while the band’s name is Cave Mountain, he didn’t expect to be playing in one. The old creek rock walls from floor to ceiling kind of give it that appearance.

> Searching through the small print we found a world premier happening in the Whitewater Valley this week, Friday to be exact at Hall Auditorium in collegiate Oxford. Although the obscure marks on this modern archeological find have not been completely decyphered yet, it appears as ‘Rhapsody on Gabriel???s Theme’.

   Also on the musical docket are works by Brahms, Tchaikovsky and Glinka performed by Miami University Symphony Orchestra for simply the price of going there, sitting down and listening.

>   It wouldn’t be fair not to mention the weekend performances of ‘Yes Virginia, the Musical’ at the Performing Arts Center in Harrison High.

   We all know the poem and those of us who have visited any of the past several Metamora Christmas tree lighting ceremonies have heard Steve Collier read it, but who knew there was a musical? And why isn’t it more popular.

   These things and more you will discover this Friday, Saturday and/or Sunday at the high school in Harrison, Ohio.

>   Ever since Limelight Monday went viral back in our analog days on St. Thomas, we have looked on Monday’s as a sleeping giant when it comes to music entertainment possibilities. The conventional thinking is usually that nobody wants to do anything on Monday, but Limelight Monday proved that’s not always true.

   An experiment in that direction happens next Monday at the Lawrenceburg Public Library over the noon hour, or make that two hours. What appears to be a series is called Music on Mondays and some part of the library will probably be converted into Annie’s Classics Café.

   You’ve heard of thinking outside of the box? Well this is putting a box inside a box, a café du jour inside a library.

   And what are Classics anyway? we wonder.

 

Running of the mice

   The cornfield behind my new house in Metamora was harvested starting Thursday evening. They worked late into the night. The result of that eerie view of small beady headlights illuminating the dark work of giant cultivating machines growling down the rows was to release the field mice.

   This, of course, upset the balance of nature resulting in a distinct diminishing of the number of street cats prowling for handouts in Metamora. As Connie Cookie Jar reported the field mice migrate towards town at harvest time.

   It started in my little household with Alice, the inside cat, catching a mouse in the kitchen on Thursday and devouring it in the small, entirely enclosed music room. Not a trace was found, but unlike other locked room mysteries, we know who done it.

   Next evening the field was down and on Saturday morning there were cat smiles all around as Madam New, the outdoor cat, showed Alice what was going on.

   Now it’s Sunday morning and with the warm temperatures all night, both cats are nowhere to be seen, not even showing up for their morning feed. But I understand. Last night was cat heaven. They had a full moon to hunt by and a sea of mice coming toward them through the corn rubble wave after wave. Like I said, cat heaven.

   And Connie says it happens every year. Therefore, with all the authority we can muster, we declare November moon in Metamora, Mice Running Moon.

   Metamora is always looking for something to celebrate. I wonder if an annual Running of the Mice ordeal would be something worth considering. If so, I suggest we discuss it at Mousies, one of the best restaurants in Connersville.

 

Twice is not enough at Mousie’s.

   If I were a Connersvillian, I would hang out at Mousie’s Cafe. Mousie’s cooks good! Ask anybody who’s eaten there, probably since it opened in 1953. It has the air of an institution but is disguised as a bar. That’s what you see when you walk in the side door from the parking lot which has to be ample enough to hold between 150 and 200 people, about the same number who could be seated in Mousie’s.

   On first glance you wouldn’t think it would be that many, but Mousie’s is deceptive. The first time in I thought all there was to it was the bar and the booths along the wall. I saw people occasionally disappearing into the small, dark hallway but that’s what you’d expect with the bathrooms that way.

   On my second visit I was led through that small dark chamber to the full, bright expanse of dining room where large parties might gather and mingle with other large parties. Plenty of room for more than one large party at Mousie’s and that’s just the first thing you see.

   The dining room winds to the right and finishes in an upper chamber with two eight top round tables and a mirrored cabinet along one wall making the room seem larger than it is.

   But that’s just the where of Mousie’s Cafe, the what is the cooking. The kitchen is the thing that allows Mousie’s to fill 150 seats. The kitchen is good and it’s going to get better.

   According to one of the owners who was kind enough to show a photographer (which I obviously was at the time) around, they are struggling to find the right place to fit a grill into the kitchen-scape.

   You’d imagine a place that has been around since before pizza and rock and roll, would have had a grill before now. Maybe they felt constricted somehow by the name. According to the menu cover, it is Mousie’s Café, not Mousie’s Grill.

   I have been to Mousie’s Café twice which as I said somewhere before, is not enough. The first time I had the chicken quesadilla from the appetizer list and would recommend it as a solo meal or a dish to share as it was probably intended. On the second trip I tried the fish, a large breaded, deep-fried Walleye. It came on an almost fitting bun with nothing else on the plate which made it seem lonely or sparse.

   The sandwich was ala carte, meaning I had to pay extra for the cole slaw, and I’d do it again. The cole slaw was excellent which is not usually the case here in the Whitewater Valley. Having to pay for each item is an idea that might cost the patron a little more, but gives them only what they want. It also allows for patron creativity. It follows the Spanish tapas idea where you have this spread of options and arrange your plate to suit your taste. But it makes Mousie’s a few dollars more than your average community café/ grill/restaurant where your Walleye sander comes with a side or two at or less than the same price.

   I wouldn’t say Mousie’s food is cheap. It is reasonable and taking advantage of the special of the day will keep you away from single-iteming your bill up into the double digits, if that’s a concern.

   On-line reviews claim the burgers are the best in Connersville. They also complain about the gravelly voiced waitresses and the smokey bar. My experience was younger, smiling waitresses and clean air due to the new Indiana non-smoking law.

   (Thank you California wherever you are.)

 


 

 

 

 

 

Last patch of first snow, 1 pm, Nov. 12, 2013
GASPIX©2013


Guide Posts

Issue 123


Local Music Scene

   It seems just as they begin, they are doing their last show of the season. They are the Bluegrass plank of the newly building Metamora Performing Arts ship. They are also GI and Jo Ball who put on the Bluegrass shows across US 52 in the Gateway Park’s facility a few years ago.

   GI Ball is bound and determined to bring Bluegrass music to Metamora on a regular basis. So he and his wife Jo put on the GI Jo Show (though they don’t call it that) bringing in music and providing home-cooked food and light refreshments.

   Where their first iteration was in collaboration with the Whitewater Canal Byway Association, the owner of Gateway Park and its restaurant facility (where GI built the present still-standing stage, thank you very much) this time the GI Jo Show is a production of Metamora Performing Arts, itself a most active off-shoot of Historic Metamora, a proper 501c3.

   Instead of playing at the Gateway Park, their show this Saturday at 6 pm is at one of the town’s original blacksmith shops on the corner of Clayborn and Columbia in downtown Metamora, which since it’s hardly a town might be a stretch to call it downtown. Say rather in the heart of Metamora.

   (I say ‘one of the’ because my house is founded on another old blacksmith shop. It, too, on Clayborn Street but up Gravel Hill.)

   For six bucks, the same price as Connersville Bluegrass MA on Friday nights, you can hear Cave Mountain, a Bluegrass band from Northern Kentucky this Saturday. GI said the house band will start the show. GI plays the mandolin with Metamora’s Baggy Bottom Boys and you can bet he’ll be a key part of the house band.

   The old blacksmith shop is an experience in and of itself, wooden floors, rock walls and open rafters. They (meaning GI) built a little stage and there’s a small wooden dance floor for when things get out of hand. The main room is big and square, not gigantic but big enough.

   It will be interesting to see where Jo will put her food and if that stage holds when things get to stompin’ on Saturday night.

 

Richmond Pre-Holiday Give-a-Thon

   On Friday a musical fundraiser in Richmond bears the Whitewater Valley’s biggest city’s name, Heart Strings of Richmond. For a $25 donation, which will also get you a place at the table with plate, Heart Strings of Richmond will ‘discover the remarkable history of our city through the legacy of music.’

   And here’s a most intriguing note from the producers, Gateway Vineyard Fellowship, ‘Music from Richmond created a unique sound that impacted the entire world.’ So, for your donation you get an interesting, educational musical program, good fellowship, a meal and the long, warm afterglow of knowing you supported a good cause, Gateway Vineyard Fellowship’s Food Ministry.

* We wonder if Youth Spotlight Night is another name for an Idol competition? You be the judge. Talented teenagers from Wayne County and surrounds, which we loosely interpret as the rest of the Whitewater Valley, are asked to perform at Spotlight Night at Dennis Intermediate School in Richmond Saturday evening at 5. Performers get in free while the audience, dba ‘the screaming fans’, pay $5 each.

   There is no mention of a panel of judges, but since the top three performers will receive cash prizes, judgments must be made somehow. Money raised after the prizes are paid will go to Youth As Resources which “empowers youth to find their potential and positively affect their community.”

   There will refreshments available and items for raffle.

* On Sunday afternoon Circle U Help Center will sponsor a fundraising concert featuring performers from Richmond Symphony Orchestra and the Ball State University Singers at Civic Hall thus completing a three-day weekend where philanthropic Valley citizens can get all of their holiday giving done before they start their holiday shopping.

 

Hoops and the hungry

   Hoops houses extend the growing season. Oxford Farmers Market is extending its market season in part because one of their farmers is proving the truth of that statement. In other words, hoop houses, under whatever name, are extending not only the growing season, but the Farmers Market season in Oxford. Pretty cool.

   Tunnels or hoop houses are temporary agricultural structures with arched or hoop frames covered with clear plastic. They can easily be covered, uncovered, assembled and disassembled in order to adjust to the weather and move to a different field site.

   If that’s something that peaks your interest you should hie yourself to Michaela Farm in Oldenburg this Wednesday afternoon for an important program called Extending the Growing Season.

   Here’s what Anna Morrow wrote: “The afternoon will begin with a tour of the low tunnels and vegetable gardens at Michaela Farm. After the tour, we will go indoors to the classroom and connect with the field day at Pinney Purdue Ag Center via the web.

   “Matt Kleinhenz will discuss using mid-size and low tunnels for cool season crops in fall and winter. Valerie and Doug will share their knowledge about growing winter vegetables in high tunnels. The afternoon will end with time for discussion by all participants.”

     Michaela Farm calls them low tunnels, Valerie and Doug use high tunnels, but a hoop house by any name would smell as sweet, especially growing greens in low sun February.

* Acclaimed as one of the most powerful and innovative female leaders in the world, Ellen Gustafson is co-founder of Food Tank: the Food Think Tank, a new organization highlighting innovative ideas in agriculture and food systems that help alleviate hunger, obesity and poverty. She probably already knows about hoop houses, but you might ask her, if you get a chance.

   Ms Gustafson will be delivering the convocation, well if not ‘the’, ‘a’ convocation at Earlham College also on Wednesday afternoon. For those interested in applying her food-thinking thoughts immediately, it would be possible to hustle from the completion of Ms Gustafson’s undoubtedly inspiring words to Michaela Farm still in time for the garden tour and low tunnel experience.

 

A Guide to the possible

   Mia culpa if you ever go to one of the events listed in the calendar and it’s not happening when or where we said. It’s my fault because I don’t call up each of these events to verify they are in fact going to happen with the where’s and when’s all coordinated as per our calendar.

   Nope, the Whitewater Valley Guide is a labor of love and that we would not love. If you could dial the number and get an answer, that would be one thing, but there would be call backs, wrong persons, unanswered phones, etc.

   The answer, come to think of it, is email. It really is. If every listing had an email address I could see a way to almost universal (which is another way of saying not universal at all) validity, of attaining that lofty end so seldom achieved, pure credibility. Then there would be almost (that word again) absolute assurance that when you see it in the Guide, it’s so.

   But short of email verification demanded before a listing may appear in the Guide you gotta take some of the responsibility yourself. I mean now that you know we, editorial ‘we’ meaning ‘me’) are flawed, you’ll think twice and verify it yourself.

   In the past, I have tried to make sure every listing had a phone number so you would be able to call, verify and maybe get some insight. But once in awhile for reasons of special interest I have listed an event without a phone number.

   In an effort to tighten up the holes in the process of providing you with a more reasonably accurate calendar of events for the entire Whitewater Valley, more or less and give or take, I, meaning editorial ‘we’, will no longer publish listings in the Whitewater Valley Calendar of Events without either a phone number or an email address.

   That way if you take me and us seriously, drive 40 miles and find out I, you and we were wrong, I alone can blame you in that same state of singularity.

   After all, this is a Guide to the possibilities not a guarantee of those possibilities.

 

 

Gary August Schlueter



Issue 122


Two anniversaries feted

   This appears to be the week of the anniversary. In Metamora on Saturday folks will celebrate the 175th anniversary of the platting of the town with a kind of show and tell. Metamorans alive and passed are invited but of the former branch things are asked, like if you have items of interest to Metamora’s history, bring ‘em.

   Some items from Historic Metamora’s collection will be on display along with a slide show of old Metamora photos. There will be a scanner on hand to digitize any old photos of Metamora you might have in your collection. A copy of any digi-pix gathered will be shuffled off to Julie at Brookville Library for the permanent local history files. And remember, those photos don’t have to be from the 19th Century.

   While you may have been looking the other way 1975 has suddenly slipped into history. So if you grew up in Metamora in the golden luster days before Duck Creek Crossing was built and tourism crowded out the old townies and the old town, bring your memories to share. It goes on from 4 to 6 pm and light refreshments will be served.

   Next, it’s the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and the Sixth Ohio Living History Association along with the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War are bringing Lincoln back to life to celebrate at the pioneer village at Governor Bebb Park in Okeana. The program fits the setting and vice versa.

   If you haven’t been to Governor Bebb Park this Saturday or Sunday might be a good time to do a little local touring. The activities are designed to keep you moving through the village, from the military drill on the village green to meeting the 16th President in the schoolhouse to seeing him again in Bebb Cabin as he would have been when he left Springfield.

   There will be stories from the battlefield, music by Cincinnati Dulcimer Society, a procession to the cemetery stage where Edward Everett will give his opening speech, followed by the address itself. And that’s just Saturday.

   Similar things happen on Sunday with the addition of a divine service at the schoolhouse at 10:15 and a ladies fashion show on the main stage at noon.

 

Local Music Scene

   We could do a Friday, Saturday, Sunday music thing in Richmond this weekend and spend absolutely nada.

   Earlham Rhythm Project is jumping off-campus to play Common Grounds Coffeehouse on not-far-away West Main in Richmond. The music is free as are the grounds. Coffee, on the other hand, might cost you something.

   (Quick musical reminder: All the Earth around is our common ground.)

   The African Children’s Choir at Civic Hall in Richmond this Saturday evening would be a great way to spoon feed the kids some global culture. The bad news is you’ll need a ticket; the good news is tickets are free.

   The Chamber Music Concert on Sunday afternoon at Earlham College’s Stout Meetinghouse would make a great lure to folks out of town for a slow Sunday exploration of some of the things Richmond has to offer. Like food, food and more food. (Must be near lunchtime.)

 

Beware the spirit of Pontiac

   You’d think it’s a little late in the year for a PowWow, but that’s only if you thought PowWows needed to be held outdoors in the slowly chilling November winds. The Native PowWow this Saturday and Sunday will be held indoors at Richmond’s National Guard Armory in the hopefully warm and glowing confines of this military stronghold.

An armory is a place where arms are kept, right? Therefore, ‘stronghold’ is not to strong a word.

   So here’s where fantasy kicks in. Sort of the curse of the fictitious mind.

   I have been struck by how much deference is paid to the U. S. military in every PowWow or Native Gathering I’ve been to. There are always dances honoring veterans and sometimes flag ceremonies. The American flag is always prominent at a PowWow, but what if that were all a smokescreen.

   What if this week at the Richmond National Guard Armory the spirit of Pontiac is invoked and once inside the armory, they lock the doors, take the janitor captive, break out the arms and go on the war path again? I mean wouldn’t you want to be there to see that?

 

Foodie alerts!

   We’ve got a lot of food news to share this week, sort of sustenance for the brain rather than the belly. In order to accommodate a local farmer who is using hoop houses to extend the growing season, Oxford Farmers Market Council has decided to offer mini-markets from 10 to noon most Saturdays during winter. OFM will continue their main market winter schedule every third Saturday.

   These hoop houses and other growing season extension systems are the topic of a special program coming up on Wednesday, November 13 at Michaela Farms in Oldenburg. More about that next week.

 

‘Robust’ as opposed to ‘Go bust’

   Sister Claire Whalen in Oldenburg wants to remind users of food (that’s us) that our opinions about locally food could help shape federal rules and regulations. The USDA Food and Drug Administration is requesting comments about its rules to implement the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) before November 15, 2013.

   FDA’s public affairs for Indiana is Carol Gallagher. Here’s how to reach her:

Carol Gallagher, Public Affairs Technician

(317) 226-6500 x 109

FAX (317) 226-6506

carolann.gallagher@fda.hhs.gov

FDA – Indianapolis Resident Post

101 W. Ohio St, Suite 1300

Indianapolis, IN 46204

   She doesn’t seem to have a counterpart in Ohio, so if I was a Buckeye I’d send my comments to Ms Gallagher. It’s a federal law so it shouldn’t matter who funnels your comments to D.C.

   The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition represents many groups advocating for organically and naturally grown food on small to mid-sized farms. A feed posted Friday, November 1, on the National Sustainable Agriculture website reported, 29 organizations sent a letter to House and Senate members of the Farm Bill conference which met for the first time, last Thursday.

   They asked those representatives to “provide a robust Rural Development title that promotes economic growth and stability in rural areas.”

   The easiest single thing for you to say to FDA is Congress should provide the same $400 million it has provided in the last three farm bills (1996, 2002, 2008) for rural development programs. The Senate bill presently has a $228 million mandatory funding level. The House bill is worse.

   This is not a case where less is more. Four hundred million should be the floor, the least weasel, so to speak.

   Some of the potentially unfunded rural ag programs in the new Farm Bill include Value-Added Producer Grant program, Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program, Rural Water/Wastewater projects.

  

Heartland security discount

   There’s something to be said about rural diversification and homeland security. We, the rurally diversified, provide our own homeland security. In our neck of the woods we might call it heartland security and it comes about by our not being clustered together like 10 million New Yorkers.

   Fly a plane into them and thousands of people are killed, fly a plane into us and it lands in a field we have to use 4x4’s to get to.

   We ruralites spend a lot of money on homeland security for those at-risk metropolites. We should get some kind of a discount because we are properly diversified across the land and are not the target for terrorist attacks. These rural assistance programs in the Farm Bill are just a small step towards fulfilling that discount.

 

Zen mind and empty bowls

   One of the coolest, most integrated programs for helping the poor (other than Halloween) is Oxford Empty Bowls. At a $10 fixed price luncheon, guests choose from amongst a collection of beautiful bowls created, decorated and donated by Miami University students and Oxford area potters.

   Zen you are asked to look into your empty bowl contemplating the many other empty bowls in the world. Then and only then, you may have it filled with your choice of soups made by local cooks. When you leave you take your again empty bowl home to serve as a reminder of that brief contemplation and what it means to ‘them that’s got’ and ‘them that’s not.’

   Oxford Empty Bowls happens this Saturday from 11 am to 2 pm in the fellowship hall of Oxford United Methodist Church. It raises ‘much-needed’ funds for Oxford Community Choice Food Pantry programs.

 

Wolverine’s little brother

   We received a great story from Frank Page which we’ve been sitting on for a few months while we tried to figure out what to do with it. We can honestly report, in all this time, nothing came to mind. So without fanfare here’s Frank’s story about how the Miami U.’s Natural History Museum acquired a once living replica of the Wolverine’s smallest relative, the Least Weasel.

 

The Least Weasel Story

By Frank Page

   4G and me are huge animal lovers and outdoorsy people, and before we hunted geocaches, we hunted animals...in a purely nonviolent way.  Our first animal we wanted to see in the wild was the bald eagle.  We live in SE Indiana and they were slowly coming back in to this area.  After seven long years we finally saw one in the wild in Toledo and Kentucky. 

   Our next animal became the least weasel.  We learned of this, the smallest and most ferocious carnivore on Earth, from a sign at the Miami Valley Whitewater forest.  We thought he was very cute because he is no bigger than a Bic pen and because his name was funny.  We imagined with big smiles a most weasel and a middling weasel, and made finding him our next goal. 

   He is native to our area, and most of the US, and for the next seven years we searched for any evidence at all of this reclusive creature.  While they are not uncommon, they are rarely seen, photographed or filmed because they are so fast and live underground. 

   About once every three years someone posts a good video or pic of a least weasel on the internet.  Exasperated, we then decided to plan our family vacation around visiting the only known least weasel in captivity, Lester, who was hit by a car and lives in a nature center in Asheville, NC.  

     As plans were developed for our trip, an important date in my career as a chef arrived...my certification practical exam.  This three-hour cooking practical went horribly for me.  From the moment I entered the building wearing my Miami University baseball hat that was standard garb at work, things went badly.  

   The American Culinary Federation president Chef Kinsella loudly berated me at the door shouting, "Show some pride in yourself and get that damn hat off your head" and I never recovered.  I bumbled through my exam and after making me wait two hours they informed me that I had failed.  This was the first failure on any kind of exam in my life.  As I was leaving, they told me I could try again in six months. 

   At first, this felt good in a cowardly way as I knew that that much time would pass before I had to stress out about or think about this again, but soon thereafter I began to explore if it was indeed true that I could not try again for such a long time.  Three days later, on a fateful Friday, I discovered that the test was being offered in two weeks time at the same place.  I called to see if I could participate, since I had just failed and been told I had to wait six months and they told me I could.  Over the next several hours at work I made the loathsome decision to not do it and wait the six months.  I went home feeling ashamed but resolute to stand by my cowardly decison, as the whole experience had been so awful.

     That night it happened.  Around 10 pm, 4G and me laying in bed heard a sound that immediately made us stiffen with primal fear.  It was a rolling, somewhat high-pitched growl coming from our computer room.  We cautiously walked to the room and immediately determined that our big black and white rescue cat Poptiar had a critter and was in a serious fight.  This in itself was not so unusual as we have a cat door and he frequently drags in prey, but the noises and ferocity of the fight were new. 

   We resolved to let it continue as the week prior I had separated him from his prey and that bloody mouse escaped and ended up dead in a pair of pajamas I slipped on a week later....nasty!  The noise and fight continued on and off over the course of the night with the creature finding temporary havens before emerging for more action. 

   I woke up several times during the night and finally, around 5 am, 4G walked out to discover the corpse of Poptiar's prey.  Typically the prey is consumed entirely except for the liver, but this one was whole with just a small disturbance on the skin around its neck.  It immediately came to her that she was looking at a least weasel!  It was long and thin and had a stubby tail and white underbelly. 

   The least weasel that we had sought for over seven years had been brought in to our own house from our own yard by our own cat!  We have tons of mole holes on our one acre rural property and that is exactly where they like to live.  In shock and slightly unable to process what had just occurred that night, 4G woke me and showed me the find.  Not exactly sure why, I scooped up the least weasel and bagged him and put him in the freezer, where he would remain for the next five months. 

     4G and I marveled at the fact that this creature we had sought for so many years, and around whom we had planned a whole summer vacation, had been living in our yard the whole time!  We were sad that he was dead, but happy Poptiar was unhurt.  We came to find out that the least weasel is extremely ferocious and capable of killing a bunny six or seven times its size. 

   The next day, I signed up for the practical exam, realizing that to me....the least weasel's appearance was a sign from a higher power telling me to reverse my poor and uncharacteristically cowardly decision.  I passed with flying colors and was informed of my success by the same Chef Kinsella who had handled me so roughly before.  We went on our vacation and arrived at the nature center where Lester resided fifteen minutes before the facility closed and fifteen minutes after they quit letting people in. 

   A dour Scandinavian woman told me there was nothing she could do and after the utterance of this line"  Ma'am, we have been planning to see this creature for the last five months, and in a way, the last seven years, and have driven all the way from Indiana, and are willing to pay full price for fifteen minutes with Lester...is there any thing in your power that you can do for us?"  She caved and in we went, for free.  Lester was asleep in a small ball and we were beginning to feel disappointed when he sprang up and put on a show that delighted us all!  Awesome!!

    When we returned home we began to ponder what we would do with our frozen least weasel.  One day I saw a video on a facility in Missouri where pets are being freeze-dried, as a more realistic-looking alternative to taxidermy.  It would be $185 and take three months but we decided to go for it.  I went to the package store and got him weighed and paid for and off he went....in to the teeth of the worst blizzard in the south central US in decades. 

   I had failed to be aware of this and when we found out, we imagined the least weasel sitting in some warehouse getting hot and stinky and were certain we ruined him.  Anticipation mounted, and finally he was returned to us.  

   When it arrived, we were blown away by its beauty.  Mounted on a water softened piece of black locust wood, and posed in an aggressive and fearful stance, jaws agape and teeth snarling, we all fell in love.  It had always been my plan to donate the weasel to a museum, but 4G, Dr. Takamatsu and Pinecone did not want to let it go. 

   As we argued over the weeks, Poptiar nailed the least weasel again, who had been carelessly left on a table he could reach.  His skin was ripped and his hair was all mussed up like he had had a long night of weasel passion.  We had him repaired and our battle over what would become of him continued.  Before it was over, the family was ready to let him go and I started having misgivings.  Finally the donation was made to the Natural History Museum in Upham Hall on the campus of Miami University of Ohio, where he proudly resides to this day.  That is the story of the least weasel and how it changed our lives.






Issue 118


What’s culture anyway?

   There’s a lot of good cultural stuff happening this week in the Whitewater Valley. If you hurry you could catch violinist Ray Chen at Hall Auditorium in Oxford on Tuesday.  

   Rent, the musical play, is having two performances on Tuesday and Wednesday also in Oxford this time at the Center for Performing Arts. Miami University Symphony Orchestra performs for free on Wednesday at Hall Auditorium.

   Finally leaving Oxford and bending culture to another extreme the Navy Bean Fall Festival is happening this Friday and Saturday in Rising Sun.

   Ertel Cellars Wine Festival features music on Saturday and Sunday along with samples of the latest vintage.

   Wolf Creek Habitat holds two Native American Gatherings each year and this is the weekend for the fall celebration. It’s located on Wolf Creek Road just inside the Greenville Treaty Line.

   I mention this because 11 years ago I met a neighbor of the habitat and he described where his land was by saying it was near the Greenville Treaty Line. I had never lived in a place where an Indian treaty line from 1795 was still part of everyday conversation.

   If that’s not culture, I don’t know what is.

 

Halloween season kick-off?

   If you think we’re in the first flirting steps of Halloween and if Halloween is your favorite holiday, you might be interested in extending the season to include what could be called a Halloween kick-off party but is billed as ‘A Fairy Exciting Event.’

   Where Brookville has its chickens and is the source of the Chicken Trail with participating fried chicken joints proudly claiming their presence on the Chicken Trail by displaying a large usually concrete chicken painted to fit (or not) some whimsy of the owners, Wayne County has its fairies.

   The Wayne County Convention and Tourism Bureau has persuaded about 20 local places to challenge their imaginations and create small, enchanted dwellings which then compose the Wayne County Enchanted Fairy Trail.

   The Enchanted Fairy Trail has a map of 20 spots with around 50 fairy or fairly-like dwellings all toll. The object of the Fairy Trail is children but those who see through the eyes of a child are also welcome.

   We are told, “Each location will have free fairy themed activities for children to participate in including; face painting, fairy dust tattoos, fairy themed crafts, snacks, coloring contests, games, fairy necklaces and much more”

   The Enchanted Fairy Trail begins at the Old National Road Welcome Center in Richmond and is manned this Saturday, from 9 am through 3 pm.

   We’ve also created a special section in the calendar with listings and as much info as we could gather without trying too hard about the many Halloween Holiday Happenings. The weirdest one is the new zip line service in Brookville which is holding a Zombie Trail along with the already scary idea of riding a zip line to your ultimate doom or destination whichever comes first.

 

The story of Jericho

   We first heard the sound of Jericho when they played very enthusiastically for next to nobody, at least not much more than crowds of ten but mostly less, sometimes just the historic re-creators with Jericho up there on the gazebo in Tow Path Park wailing away and having fun as though the music itself was enough. Imagine that.

   Then a duo from the sextet, Warren and Judy Waldron showed up Canal Days Saturday in the yard on Clayborn Street that has prominently displayed a full sized, once floatable replica canal boat called Native Son. How that canal boat came to be sitting there is a story itself, maybe even history, but not thistory.

   Judy and Warren are old friends of Artistry Farms aka Debra Bowles who is a Canal Days institution selling her handmade soap in that very yard where also is the dark performance barn challenging the Native Son for local character.

   Warren plays fiddle and Judy plays guitar. They located near the open gate facing Clayborn where most of the traffic was. The duo, especially the fiddle, reminded me of music by the Red Clay Ramblers and in an email afterwards Judy said, “We ‘borrowed’ Tell It to Me and The Telephone Girl from them.”

   If your musical taste rambles to the Red Clay Ramblers you might see if Warren’s fiddle doesn’t remind you of Bill Hicks on one or two Jericho songs. They’ll be performing this Second Friday as the featured band at this Oxford Community Arts Center monthly.

   Second Friday is from 6-9 pm. Jericho will perform in the North Parlor at 8 pm. As always on Second Friday the art studios on the third floor of the old college will be open along with the Art Shop.

   The featured artists this month are Billy Simms who “works in print making, sculpture, collage, and photography. He lives in Hamilton with his wife and two cats.”

   Jack Williams’ ‘A Journey in Sketches’ represents his travels to cities throughout the world. Both will be there to add a spark to their work that only the maker can bring, the makers mark, so to speak.

  

Missed opportunity with alpacas

   We inadvertently put a notice we wanted to feature last week in this week’s file, Issue 118 to be exact and anyone who sees this notice would notice it is obviously right for Issue 117, the week before. The dates are the big give-away. Here’s an example of what you missed:

   “Mel-O Alpacas in Batesville, Indiana will hold their annual Farm Days/Open House on Saturday, October 5 and Sunday, October 6, 2013 from 11:00 – 4:00 each day.

   “This is an opportunity to learn about raising alpacas. On Saturday, there will be an opportunity to see how a sheared fleece is made ready for processing, participate in weaving a community cloth and view products made from alpacas. On Sunday, a hand spinner and a weaver will be demonstrating their craft using alpaca fiber.

   “Admission is free. Come and meet the alpacas, enjoy the family farm and relax by the pond.

   “The farm is located at 23164 Vote Road, Batesville, In (near Oldenburg)

For additional information, email or call Mel and Deb at debandmelo@yahoo.com or 812-934-3344.”

   We pass this along to you so you may contact Mel and Deb on your own especially if you have a group which needs something different to do. I’ll bet the Mel-O people would be up for arranging something.

 

Farmers Markets

   While searching through the various digital sources to create the Whitewater Valley Guide Calendar we found three farmers markets still operating and since supporting them is important we shall list them and any others we hear about as part of the weekly calendar.

   For the record we found Oxford, Richmond and Batesville (maybe) still holding forth. There are probably others. If you know of any still open, email me garyaschlueter@gmail.com.

 

Happy trails.


By the way, to receive a free copy of the Whitewater Valley Calendar of entertainment activities for the week, email whitewater.valley.guide@gmail.com. Subject: Calendar

 

 

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Issue 117 

 

‘S’gone

   See what I told ya about September, like a scone, it’s gone. Still, don’t tell the weather it’s October and maybe we’ll be okay for a while longer.    

   Beautiful days and beautiful nights have a feeling of eternity to them or at least how it should be weather-wise in eternity. Heaven would be like this with the river just warm enough and the air just cool enough.

 

Hot times in the Valley

   A couple of big events attract us to the northern and southern extremes of our Whitewater Valley this weekend, Aurora Farmers Fair in the south and the Fall Gathering near Eaton in the north.

   Preble County Historical Society’s Fall Gathering promises ‘something for everyone this year’ and closes with an exclamation mark ‘!’ so who knows? It is 11 am to 5 pm both Saturday and Sunday, which makes scheduling easy to remember.

   Some of the highlights are, an auction and collections of living history tableau, ham & bean soup and homemade ice cream (not necessarily one on top of the other). There will be music in The Amphitheatre from 2 pm with John Kogge, Cecilia’s Rant and Hibberd Connection Bluegrass playing one hour shows until closing.

   Sunday appears to be flute day at The Amphitheater starting at 12:30 when Mystic Flutes & Tribal Drums perform. Flute artist and storyteller John DeBoer follows at 1:30 then the Celtic Knots flute followed finally and effectively by Higher Vision Bluegrass.    

   Other storytellers and historical impersonators will spice the human stew. Then there’s that auction on Saturday.

   Along the Ohio from Wednesday through Saturday, Aurora Farmers Fair turns a good section of the old river town into a carnival, but Hoosier style. There will be music, food and plenty of old friends catching up and new friends to be made.

   Then in the center of the Valley it’s the 43rd Canal Days in Metamora on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Canal Days: Tubesocks to treasures in a vendors extravaganza amidst a background of unique historical authenticity.

   Hot times in the Valley — up, down and middle.

 

Picture The Aqueduct with a name

   The Preble County Historical Society built an amphitheater and apparently have named it The Amphitheater. I suggest we, our society in general, name the aqueduct carrying the Whitewater Canal over Duck Creek in Metamora The Aqueduct for the same reason, eminent practicality.

 

Michael Martone reads

   Today (Tuesday, for those who may have advanced past it) one of the most prominent and celebrated authors writing about Indiana today, will read from his work at Earlham College, 7 pm.

   Michael Martone grew up in Fort Wayne and is now a professor and director of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Alabama

   He continues to focus in his writing on Indiana and the Midwest. His books include Alive and Dead in Indiana, The Blue Guide to Indiana, The Flatness, Racing in Place, Double-Wide, and, most recently, Four for a Quarter. 

 

Local Music Scene


Richmond

    On Saturday, Ben Crawford will release his second solo CD, "Love & War" in a street concert in front of Roscoe's Coffee Bar & Tap Room. Fort Wayne Avenue will be blocked off for this outdoor event probably before the starting time of 7:30 pm.


Versailles

   You are invited to relax in beautiful Versailles State Park this Saturday and Sunday (camping of course is one of the highlights of the park), while you enjoy the Versailles Bluegrass Festival. Twelve regional bluegrass bands are scheduled. It’s five dollars per day plus park entrance fee.

 

Walking, talking cemetery

   This Saturday’s experience in Earlham Cemetery ‘Tales from the Departed’ is a great example of how to capitalize on what is unique about the Whitewater Valley, the people who came before and built this Valley.

   It’s billed as a ‘wonderful fall walking tour of Earlham Cemetery. Several departed people will be re-enacted by actors at their gravesides. Learn local history as these stories come to life.’

   The cost is $10 per carload which is a family-friendly way of creating the magic of marketplace economics locally.

 

 Soap Box: Vision 2020

   Dave White of White’s Farm and head of the CIC in Franklin County posed an interesting question which John Estridge quoted in last week’s Brookville Democrat. Mr. White was speaking specifically about Franklin County but his words could be applied to the rest of us who do not live along an interstate corridor.

   He said if he was going to build a new factory, it would be along the interstate. His point was about the relative wisdom of communities in the hinterlands (the backcountry where the freeways are not) chasing smokestack industry.

   We know it’s true that industry these days follows transportation corridors. It’s certainly not new. Older towns like Penntown, Indiana which was established on an old trail which became SR 46 lost ground to towns like Sunman a couple of miles south along SR 101 when the railroad came through in the late 1800s. But unlike many other towns where this happened, with an I-74 interchange as its doorstep Penntown will have its revenge.

   Mr. White said it wasn’t necessarily a bad thing not having a whiz-bang, roll-fast commercial dynamo in your backyard. But, he said, “What we need to do is figure out what our position is given the surrounding territory and the people that live here.”

   When I moved to Carpinteria, California in 1998, the small, seaside town in southern Santa Barbara County had just finished publishing a document called Vision 2020. It was created by the townspeople under the leadership of their town council and was truly a successful example of community consensus. It told everyone what everyone had decided they wanted the town to look like in 2020.

   By publishing it as a booklet which every citizen, even new ones, could read it effectively gave marching orders to those council-people. It actually made governance easier because it told them exactly what the community wanted on a number of specific fronts. It also attracted the kinds of industry the towns people wanted and served those industries by letting them know they were welcome.

   Vision 2020 also held the various council-toes to the fire, for if they didn’t perform or began to deviate they’d feel the consequences. In the two election cycles I reported on for the Carpinteria Coastal View people were voted in or out of office based in large part on Vision 2020.

   This seems to be along the lines of what Mr. White meant when he said, “Knowing what we have, then have a vision of what we can become.” Getting it in writing like the Vision 2020 document is one way of keeping it all up front. 2020 is a little over six years away, still it’s never too late to begin looking forward together.

 


Building the Cedar Grove bridge in 1914.

Photo courtesy Don Fohl


Issue 116


Show, Show, Fest

   The three biggies in the Whitewater Valley this weekend are, in no particular order, Franklin County Antique Machinery Show, Versailles Pumpkin Show and Lawrenceburg’s Fall Fest.

   We like three things about the Versailles Pumpkin Show, the first is that it’s a show, the second is that it’s in Versailles and the third is, at 111 it’s been going on longer than any of us reading this have, if like me you consider your life a goings on.

   The Pumpkin Show from Wednesday through Sunday is made up of lots of music. “Rain or shine, the stage shows go on, so bring your lawn chairs and umbrellas or ponchos to ward off any precipitation!’ says their website where you find the Show’s schedule. www.ripleycountytourism.com/pumpkin/

   There will be vendors, food, games, craft booth, talent show, art show and to keep with the theme, a pumpkin baking contest on Thursday morning from 8 to 10 am.

   Lawrenceburg Fall Fest is always one of those over-the-top experiences, armchair judging by what we’ve reported for the past three years. We’ve never actually been but this year the music calls in the form of Dave Mason, whom we interviewed when he moved to St. Thomas many, short years ago.

   Other stars from Rock’s classic period due at Fall Fest this year include Richie Furay, Burton Cummings and Dickey Betts. The names of the bands these gentlemen once belonged to is pretty scary, The Allman Brothers, the Guess Who, Poco/Buffalo Springfield and Traffic. Far out, man!

   A BBQ cook-off and a chili cook-off will join a variety of food booths and rides to create a carnival atmosphere. The entertainment starts on Thursday at 5 pm. Music continues through Saturday with the aforementioned performing Saturday afternoon at 3:30.

   Every year the Franklin County Antique Machinery Show features a particular maker and this year it’s Massey Harris and Ferguson Tractors and such. Old fashioned ways are on display in more than just machinery of another age. Wander through the village of bygone crafts-makers creating brooms or soap or ice cream. Talking with the costumed folk artists is the closest you can come to speaking to the people of the past. Give it a try.

   On Friday evening there’s an antique tractor pull and on Saturday a horse pull.

 

Canal Trail & the Great Outdoors

   The Whitewater Canal Trail people are going to be busy this weekend and you’re invited to jump in to any and all of their doings. First off it’s ‘Grilling for Dollars’ at the Brookville IGA at lunchtime (11-2) on Friday and Saturday.

   The Franklin County Antique Machinery Show is also happening at the same time on those same days and since the IGA is located at US 52 and Blue Creek Road, there will be plenty of traffic and reasons for you to do more than one thing.

   Besides Grilling for Dollars, WCT is holding its annual garage sale at Hoosier Pete’s gas station on Saturday morning from 0700 ‘til noon. Look for the biggest chicken on Main Street in Brookville and you’ll have found Hoosier Pete’s. There is a replica fuel pump out front and the roofed drive-in bay holds scads and scads of brochures and hand-outs from various attractions and businesses around the area.

   Behind Hoosier Pete’s, which is at the bottom of Oregon Hill if that helps, is the short trail to WCT’s Tecumseh Landing. There is a WCT replica Indian long house there and, of course, the beautiful West Fork. The trail down has traditionally been a fishing path and donkey years ago Brookville used to hang people there.

   The Whitewater Valley Walkers, an off-shoot of WCT, is holding its second sanctioned hike on Saturday. The Brookville 10K Hike will pass Hoosier Pete’s (Checkpoint #1) on one of its circuits. American Volkssport Association sanctioning calls for 10k walks and it took a bit of twisting and turning, especially since the path also needed to pass as many Brookville historic sites as possible.

   WCT is also part of greater Cincinnati’s The Great Outdoors Weekend which offers more than 150 free events this weekend. On Sunday WCT invites you to a walking tour to Whitewater Canal Lock 21. Meet WCT volunteers at the Trail parking lot at Moster’s Turf on US 52 near Yellow Bank Road at 1 pm for an easy stroll to the lock.

 

Hike, Hike, Bike

   While we’re on the subject of being greatly outdoors, Hike-A-Thon Plus is giving out “Take A Hike” tee shirts, while they last on Saturday from 8 to 5. It starts at a parking lot near downtown Oxford. Since among the many activities being planned is geocaching, we suggest you use this to locate the parking lot. The directions say ‘at the intersection of Rt. 27 and Rt. 73 go east .07 miles.’ So if you haven’t got your geocatcher we hope you at least have a compass to point you east.

   Once you find the place you will also find live music, natural roods, live raptors, hikes and bird walks. So if you’ve been practicing your chicken walk this is the place to roll it out.

   The Oxbow Nature Conservancy on US 50 in Greendale, Indiana is observing the Great Outdoor Weekend this Saturday with a ‘chance to explore our region’s natural resources.’ You want to be there at 6 pm for the 1.5 mile hike called Evening Settles on the Floodplain.

   On the Cardinal Greenway they are holding BikeTOURberbest which if you look closely and close one eye you might see as almost an Oktoberfest thing, but not quite. This starts at 9 am in Richmond on Saturday and costs either $25 or $15. See the calendar for more details.

 

Local Music Scene

   Both Firehouse BBQ and Little Shebas, two Richmond hot spots for musical entertainment, are holding Octoberfest celebrations this Saturday. Jay Jesse Johnson and his band are playing outside at Little Shebas and Sean Lamb and his band are playing Firehouse BBQ. But Firehouse is also having The Doug Hart Band and the Funkyard Dogs on their Octoberfest menu.

   If you’ve been listening while watching television commercials lately you may have noticed an up-surge of poly-rhythmic Indian music. If you like what you hear, stop at Oxford’s Hall Auditorium this Saturday for Global Rhythms: Headlamps of Many Eyes. It features over 200 performers from around the world. The project aims to go deeper in uncovering the beauty of several cultures.

   ‘Tis the season for Common Grounds. The coffee house acoustic music venue at the West Richmond Friends Meeting on West Main in Richmond is celebrating its 10th season of being a “friendly space to feed the body and sole through food, fellowship and artistic expression.” To which we add, Amen.

   Joshua Brown is the featured artist this Friday from 7 to 10 pm. The folksinger plays dulcimer, banjo and guitar and covers everything from gospel to sea chanties.

   Music in Metamora this weekend includes the monthly open mike Acoustic Final Friday from seven onwards and on Saturday Bomar & Ritter are featured at Country Cooking’s Blues & BBQ series.